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Non-internet ways a quick learning antisocial type can supplement his income?

KamarKamar Registered User regular
I really want to find a way to do less freelance writing while keeping my bills paid, since it eats into the mental space I need to work on writing fiction (I wanna be an author, dammit).
But I'm pretty well incapable of normal jobs, thanks to a laundry list of mental ailments (and no car or 'real' work history in a small dead southern town). I know internet ways to do it, but I really hate working on the internet at this point.

I'm thinking about things like buying and repairing broken electronics, flipping stuff from local pawn shops/thrift stores/craiglist/etc., buying things and making them better with DIY methods (turn a desk into a standing desk, treadmill into a treadmill desk...basically desk-related things for some reason), that sort of thing.

Anyone have any experience with any of these or have other ideas? If it can be learned and done without formal education, I can learn and do it.

Posts

  • EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    How do you feel about security-style positions? I have a friend in Minneapolis who used to work as a "monitor" for a mental health facility. She says that 99% of the time, the job is easy and you have your own time to do things (such as write) and while you do have to keep an eye on people, most people at the facility are no problem.

    Any security style job where you basically sit in a space and keep an eye on things is going to provide some extra money, at the cost of taking up some of your free time. The advantage is that they're typically antisocial and they allow you to do other things, such as play video games, write, edit, and so on.

    As for the "random hour" type jobs like resale, usually the jobs are not really good for making extra money. I made a LOT of money selling records and video games, but only because I had already spent money on them a long time ago (so I was not buying things to sell, but instead getting rid of "junk."). Otherwise, you need to find an area where you could become a subject-matter expert and then research prices. You need to become an expert so you understand what people are generally looking for in the sale, and so you can locate those items easily and rate them accordingly from potential sellers. The main problem is that you have to generally hunt for things in your local market and then sell them online to reach a non-local market, and there's competition from others who own actual retail pawn shops.

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  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    This is a huge economics question, really.

    You can almost assume that in the population there is nearly an infinite amount of free time at home which can be sent on any projects. Any task which can be performed without any kind of formal training, speciality capability or tools, and without having to travel outside the home, has an incredibly low wage value.

    What you need to focus on are, "What things can I do that very few other people looking to make money from home can?" Knowledge of electronics, specialized woodworking tools, whatever, anything along those lines are going to help you focus on something that might actually be valuable to produce with your spare time.

    Otherwise you have to functionally sell hours of your time at someone else's site, doing something like security.

    What is this I don't even.
  • NocrenNocren Lt Futz, Back in Action North CarolinaRegistered User regular
    edited July 2013
    EggyToast wrote: »
    How do you feel about security-style positions? I have a friend in Minneapolis who used to work as a "monitor" for a mental health facility. She says that 99% of the time, the job is easy and you have your own time to do things (such as write) and while you do have to keep an eye on people, most people at the facility are no problem.

    Any security style job where you basically sit in a space and keep an eye on things is going to provide some extra money, at the cost of taking up some of your free time. The advantage is that they're typically antisocial and they allow you to do other things, such as play video games, write, edit, and so on.

    As for the "random hour" type jobs like resale, usually the jobs are not really good for making extra money. I made a LOT of money selling records and video games, but only because I had already spent money on them a long time ago (so I was not buying things to sell, but instead getting rid of "junk."). Otherwise, you need to find an area where you could become a subject-matter expert and then research prices. You need to become an expert so you understand what people are generally looking for in the sale, and so you can locate those items easily and rate them accordingly from potential sellers. The main problem is that you have to generally hunt for things in your local market and then sell them online to reach a non-local market, and there's competition from others who own actual retail pawn shops.

    The Security thing is nice, but A) there is a sink cost (getting your license) and B) depending on the work site you might be monitored and not allowed to work on your own things. I did get a lot of my homework done while I worked a security desk, but I had to do research on my phone (out of camera angle) and email my papers to myself (since I couldn't go to my school's website).

    On the plus side, you really do get a lot of free time when you're sitting at a desk for 8 hours. And when I wasn't monitored I wrote a lot, including but not limited to: a "Behind the Music" type documentary for my Rock Band band, a Star Trek Online fan fic based on my characters, and a thesis on My Little Pony.

    EDIT: The above was when I was first brought in on a site that wasn't monitoring me and wasn't wired for cameras yet (so there was nothing for me to monitor yet). I had to sit a the front desk and play receptionist for 8 hours, even during weekends/evenings because the company acquired a state government contract that mandated all primary access points be manned 24/7.

    Like I said, it depends entirely on the site you're working at as well as your supervisor and contract holder.

    Nocren on
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