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animated GIFs without random off-color pixels

Chaotic DescentChaotic Descent Registered User regular
edited April 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
I don't get it. I'm dealing with very very simple images that are all cell-shaded. we're talking about FLAT areas all of one color. Yet converting to indexed color it decides this is actually wonderful bouquet of colors, and every once in a while a pixel has to be converted into some other shade.
I have Photoshop CS and the latest Gimp. what method do I need to do to make it not be stupid when it does this? I've been searching the internet for the past hour or so with nothing to show for it.

Chaotic Descent on

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    ben0207ben0207 Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    Give us some examples and I'll have a look later (it's 4 o clock in the morning here)

    ben0207 on
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    Chaotic DescentChaotic Descent Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    ben0207 wrote: »
    Give us some examples and I'll have a look later (it's 4 o clock in the morning here)

    little yellow dots EVERYWHERE. they're really noticable on the red areas.
    Shortpackedlick.gif

    Chaotic Descent on
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    JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    This is the result of Photoshop's indexing algorithm. There should be some way for you to manually convert the entire image to indexed mode, then hand-fix all the dots.

    If there's not, try the GIMP. Open an image, then on the menu, Image -> Mode -> Indexed.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    Chaotic DescentChaotic Descent Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    jmillikin wrote: »
    This is the result of Photoshop's indexing algorithm. There should be some way for you to manually convert the entire image to indexed mode, then hand-fix all the dots.

    If there's not, try the GIMP. Open an image, then on the menu, Image -> Mode -> Indexed.

    Actually, Gimp doesn't seem to be able to help that. The animation actually is made in Gimp, since Photoshop doesn't make animated GIFs. I'm really hoping to AVOID hand-painting every damned frame. What is the method it's using to pick the palette and decide what pixels in the current image don't apply to it?
    It's strange, if I convert ONE image to indexed color, there's no problem. Maybe if I do that, then put them together in Gimp, that might help. although each frame will still have a different palette, it might be closer. :S

    Chaotic Descent on
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    JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    jmillikin wrote: »
    This is the result of Photoshop's indexing algorithm. There should be some way for you to manually convert the entire image to indexed mode, then hand-fix all the dots.

    If there's not, try the GIMP. Open an image, then on the menu, Image -> Mode -> Indexed.

    Actually, Gimp doesn't seem to be able to help that. The animation actually is made in Gimp, since Photoshop doesn't make animated GIFs. I'm really hoping to AVOID hand-painting every damned frame. What is the method it's using to pick the palette and decide what pixels in the current image don't apply to it?
    It's strange, if I convert ONE image to indexed color, there's no problem. Maybe if I do that, then put them together in Gimp, that might help. although each frame will still have a different palette, it might be closer. :S

    If you convert all the frames at once, it takes every color in the image into account because it's really not designed for dealing with animations. What you can do when converting to indexed mode is convert the first layer, save the palette to a file, then "Use custom palette" for every layer after.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    Chaotic DescentChaotic Descent Registered User regular
    edited April 2007
    jmillikin wrote: »
    jmillikin wrote: »
    This is the result of Photoshop's indexing algorithm. There should be some way for you to manually convert the entire image to indexed mode, then hand-fix all the dots.

    If there's not, try the GIMP. Open an image, then on the menu, Image -> Mode -> Indexed.

    Actually, Gimp doesn't seem to be able to help that. The animation actually is made in Gimp, since Photoshop doesn't make animated GIFs. I'm really hoping to AVOID hand-painting every damned frame. What is the method it's using to pick the palette and decide what pixels in the current image don't apply to it?
    It's strange, if I convert ONE image to indexed color, there's no problem. Maybe if I do that, then put them together in Gimp, that might help. although each frame will still have a different palette, it might be closer. :S

    If you convert all the frames at once, it takes every color in the image into account because it's really not designed for dealing with animations. What you can do when converting to indexed mode is convert the first layer, save the palette to a file, then "Use custom palette" for every layer after.
    I managed to get it to behave in photoshop, by using "previous" as a palette optimising option, and it worked perfectly fine. I saw no such options in Gimp. Maybe I'll play with it later, but I've cracked this puzzle for now, and it's been a long pointless day.
    I ended up optimising the palette of each frame manually, and then reinserting them back in.

    Chaotic Descent on
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    denihilistdenihilist Ancient and Mighty Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited April 2007
    After Effects does a pretty decent job, though I've never seen the problem using Image Ready.

    denihilist on
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