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air rifles/bb guns

ReznikReznik Registered User regular
edited May 2014 in Help / Advice Forum
Relevant info for legal questions: I am in Ontario, Canada. I am over the age of 18. I don't have a firearms license. I won't be shooting within any city limits.

I have an air gun(?) pistol that has been in the family for a while but is missing parts. It is a Diana SP50 4.5mm. To buy parts it seems like I have to order from the UK and I'm not sure if there are any legal issues with this because anything remotely related to guns in Canada is confusing as hell. But even so it seems a bit difficult to track down what I need, and probably more expensive than just buying something new. So I would kind of like to get something just for target shooting up at my camp (which is a cabin in the middle of nowhere that you have to take a boat to get to).

But firearms laws in Canada are really confusing and the last time I looked into this there were a bunch of parameters the gun needed to fall within or else it would basically be treated like a legit rifle and I'd have to get a license for it. So uh. I just want to shoot stuff. What do I buy? To be honest I'd prefer a rifle, but I wouldn't mind a really cool pistol either. I'm a total newbie to this stuff. Halp plz.

Do... Re.... Mi... Ti... La...
Do... Re... Mi... So... Fa.... Do... Re.... Do...
Forget it...
Reznik on

Posts

  • DraygoDraygo Registered User regular
    Do you want a replica - something that looks like a real gun? What is your budget? What specific type of rifle do you prefer?

    An air-soft rifle is probably what you are looking for, you have spring, aeg, and gas types available depending on what features you want.

    I cant help you much on the particulars of Canada's gun laws (INAL goes here). But in the U.S. where I live it is advised to keep the gun in a case when transporting and don't mess with the orange paint - though you don't get in any trouble if you remove it after buying it. You don't want an officer to mistake the rifle for a real gun.

  • ReznikReznik Registered User regular
    I'd like something that looks like a real gun just for coolness factor (I've seen those clear airsoft ones that look like toys and they are pretty lame), but if that is going to be a hassle law-wise then it's not a dealbreaker. For budget I don't really want to go over $150 but I have no idea if this is reasonable or not. As far as type... well, I like the look of the old-school WW2 style rifles with the wood stocks, like the Mosin-Nagant or the M1. Or really just anything that looks like your classic hunting rifle. Nothing too modern. But like, I would be over the moon if there was a replica bb gun/airsoft Mosin-Nagant that is reasonably priced (I just did a quick google search and apparently the airsoft ones cost twice as much as the real thing :| )

    Probably what's going to end up happening is this thing will get brought up to the camp right after it's purchased and it'll just stay up there year-round. But I'll definitely get a solid case for it with a lock and everything.

    Do... Re.... Mi... Ti... La...
    Do... Re... Mi... So... Fa.... Do... Re.... Do...
    Forget it...
  • Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Can't you get a serviceable Moisin Nagant for $150 in the US?

    Just get your license and buy a real rifle! Air rifles can be fun, but real guns are better.

  • InquisitorInquisitor Registered User regular
    Can't you get a serviceable Moisin Nagant for $150 in the US?

    Just get your license and buy a real rifle! Air rifles can be fun, but real guns are better.

    Real guns cost a lot more to use. Bullets are a lot more expensive than little plastic pellets.

  • ReznikReznik Registered User regular
    the problem with getting a license and a real gun is i'm not going to be able to store this firearm in my own residence. it will either be at my parents house or at the camp, and neither my parents nor my aunt (who owns the camp) have licenses. and the safety course to get the license is like $200-300.

    i just figured the air rifle route would be the simplest and cheapest.

    Do... Re.... Mi... Ti... La...
    Do... Re... Mi... So... Fa.... Do... Re.... Do...
    Forget it...
  • SkeithSkeith Registered User regular
    Can't you get a serviceable Moisin Nagant for $150 in the US?

    Just get your license and buy a real rifle! Air rifles can be fun, but real guns are better.

    Taking it over the border might present an issue.

    aTBDrQE.jpg
  • MyiagrosMyiagros Registered User regular
    For air guns there are 2 classes, 450fps and above. Anything 450fps and below is legal to own without a license, anything above that you require your PAL to even buy one.

    iRevert wrote: »
    Because if you're going to attempt to squeeze that big black monster into your slot you will need to be able to take at least 12 inches or else you're going to have a bad time...
    Steam: MyiagrosX27
  • Ash of YewAsh of Yew Registered User regular
    edited May 2014
    I think I got one of these quite a few years back. http://www.airsoftgi.com/product_info.php?cPath=139_113&products_id=1915
    It may have even been that package, if not it was awfully similar. It was fun to shoot cans with, and was fairly powerful for what it was (shot my buddy in the stomach =P and he got a pretty nasty welt, even a bit of a scar. Would penetrate cans sometimes). I didn't play airsoft or anything and just got it for dicking around. The scope was actually really nice too and the package came with a bag of bbs which I never even got around to using all of. I wouldn't say it was heavy but it didn't feel like a cheap plastic toy, and had a good amount of metal parts to it. They are supposedly not too difficult to modify with stronger springs as well.

    Some inner part on it did break, however, after a fair amount of time. I'm not entirely sure what the cause was, I think it was a combination of just all the humidity and moisture here combined with some one mishandling the thing.

    Any ways, airsoft guns are pretty fun, with the added benefit of not really having to worry about harming anything seriously. An actual bb or pellet gun has more power to it and are more fun really but I think it depends a bit on how serious you want to be with it. I'm not saying you shouldn't exercise the same amount of caution with it, but an airsoft gun is more of a "toy" where I'd say a bb or pellet gun is a weapon, and can potentially kill small animals etc. Fairly certain that's even their original purpose, where as an airsoft gun is designed for playing airsoft and shooting people without real injury.

    You say you'll be shooting it out in the middle of no where too so it doesn't really matter, but a co2 powered bb or pellet gun is actually fairly loud compared to a spring powered airsoft gun.

    Personally if I were you, I'd get a pellet gun. =P

    Ash of Yew on
  • DevoutlyApatheticDevoutlyApathetic Registered User regular
    This seems to be your relevant firearms laws. Big points are less than 500 fps muzzle velocity and you CAN NOT have ones that looks like real guns.

    The link that Ash of Yew linked gives the muzzle velocity so you'd just want to check on that before you order. I don't know how exact they are on that replica thing. Most rifles like the above look pretty similar, though maybe that just means you need that orange barrel thing on it?

    Nod. Get treat. PSN: Quippish
  • SpiritfireSpiritfire Brookfield, WIRegistered User regular
    I'm an avid airsoft hobbyist here in the US, but can't say I know the rules regarding Canada. The link from @DevoutlyApathetic is very enlightening, though, and paints a pretty dark view for the hobby in the country. On the flip side, a quick search online shows a few shops in Canada as well as a fairly active airsoft message board with one particularly detailed (yet dated) post on the legal rules for airsoft in Canada. Also, a number of larger online retailers here in the US offer products specifically marked as "Canadian Legal" or something along those lines.

  • ReznikReznik Registered User regular
    I'm confused about the laws regarding appearance since I've seen both that they can't look like real guns and they can as long as the muzzle velocity is below that 450 threshold, so I'm gonna call up the OPP or RCMP and see if I can ask somebody to clear it up for me. Ordinarily I don't have a problem with regulations and laws for firearms, but this is just kind of ridiculous :|

    I've also found this: http://airsoftdepot.ca/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=2303 which is quite a bit more than I want to pay, but is the cheapest out of the Canadian sites I've looked at and is also very pretty. It seems like everything in the style I want (wood stocks) is quite a bit more expensive than the more modern looking stuff, unfortunately. Ah well. Is that a good brand? Are there some specific brands I should stay away from?

    Do... Re.... Mi... Ti... La...
    Do... Re... Mi... So... Fa.... Do... Re.... Do...
    Forget it...
  • SpiritfireSpiritfire Brookfield, WIRegistered User regular
    edited May 2014
    Couldn't hurt to call and try to get clarification.

    Can't say I've ever heard of S&T, but they certainly have some unique pieces.

    On the field I see many hobbyists with CYMA, D-Boys, and G&G variations and they all speak highly of them. (I personally run with a brand called Tokyo Marui, but apparently they're not exactly in fashion) None of them have particularly unique pieces, though, as they all more or less imitate each other externally with virtually the same internal gearboxes. Internal and external parts can often be swapped - sometimes with real-steel pieces for the latter. I've known people to buy an AK with faux-wood exterior pieces and then install aftermarket wood furniture. However, the replicas I use are for paintball-esque events where I'm actively engaging in firefights and whatnot. What you've linked to is looks like a really nice showpiece that may or may not be suitable for "battle" use.

    On a couple US-based sites I see that there is at least one other brand of Mosin Nagant that is gas-operated and another one that is bolt-action, requiring a manual compression of the spring between each shot. I think the bolt-action ones are the most consistent and reliable shot to shot. I dropped some money on a bolt-action Maruzen brand L96 replica and bought a handful of used parts that, when installed, apparently makes it shoot too hard for safe usage on a field... I wouldn't want to get hit by it either, to be honest. Fun to pass around to friends and try to shoot cans or targets when well out of view from public eyes.

    Spiritfire on
  • DraygoDraygo Registered User regular
    General rule of thumb, the more you pay upfront the longer its going to last.

    Airsofters in general are extremely proud of their guns, if you go to an airsoft event (get a rental + mask) in your area you can probably ask around, and most of them will probably let you shoot their guns. It will probably cost you a day of your time but might be worth it before you lay down 300-400$ plus for all the gear and accessories, plus you will get some hands on time with all sorts of different guns.

    If you are getting too much power, downgrade the spring.

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