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Oh crap.

DrezDrez Registered User regular
Long story medium:

I am moving. As a result, I am cleaning.

A few years ago, my landlady had a mouse problem. The problem was this: She had uninvited mice in her apartment. Mice are small rodent-like rodents. They scurry around like mice.

As a result of my landlady having a mouse problem, we also had a mouse problem. We weathered it and eventually the mice moved out.

We also have 30+ years worth of stuff in our house. This means boxes and bins and whatnot in every corner. Until a week ago, I had forgotten our house had corners. It was like an alien geometry - a cornerless abode barricade by boxes and bins of wires, papers, gadgetry, and unused supermarket coupons.

Anyway, these corners apparently represented some kind of overground underground tunnel for our unwanted guests.

They shit everywhere.

This includes carpeted floors as well as uncarpeted floors (i.e. floors without carpet).

For surfaces like bins and whatnot, I've been using Clorox Wipes and paper towels and latex gloves and a hazmat suit (not really a hazmat suit). But I'm not sure what to do about the floors, especially the carpeted floors.

I understand you want to be careful with mouse poop in case they were carrying that lycanthropy virus or whatever it's called. I know it's rare but I want to err on the side of caution. I've read it's not even a good idea to vacuum because the poop can break down and get into the air or something. Also, vacuuming won't sterilize the floor/carpet.

Any ideas?

Switch: SW-7690-2320-9238Steam/PSN/Xbox: Drezdar

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Carpet cleaners like stanley steamers

    Wear a ventilator and open the windows while vacuuming before they get there?

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    schussschuss Registered User regular
    Call a professional.

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    SkeithSkeith Registered User regular
    edited September 2014
    If you're worried about hantavirus, look up whether there have been outbreaks in your state. If you can't find any, vacuum that shit up. In the case of hardwood or linoleum you should be fine with the same sort of wipe you've been using, but you'll need to rent a carpet cleaner somewhere and get to work for those parts of the floor. If there has been hantavirus, maybe you can hire a cleaning service and explain the situation to them (in which case they'll either know what to do or tell you to pound sand).

    Skeith on
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    DrezDrez Registered User regular
    I have a couple of hours to clean this as movers are coming in a day and a half and I need to move stuff before then and I certainly don't want to move it on/over the shit so calling a professional service in is not going to happen at least not in the timeline I have left to me. I didn't expect there to be poop in these particular corners, to be honest.

    Also, I've been exposed to it before as we had the mouse problem years ago and I've been OK.

    I definitely want to be cautious here but I also have to be realistic. I have movers coming Wednesday and the realtors are doing a showing of my apartment (2 story house, landlord selling) the Wednesday after. We won't have everything cleared out where a carpet cleaning service can even come in until right before that. We literally have a very short timeline here.

    Switch: SW-7690-2320-9238Steam/PSN/Xbox: Drezdar
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Vacuum, ventilators, open windows, rent a carpet shampooer from a store like walmart/target/wegmans/home depot or whoever carries them in your area.

    If you haven't caught it yet, you're probably not going to catch it.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    DrezDrez Registered User regular
    I'm reading information that is a bit ambiguous. By the same source. Including the CDC.

    Supposedly, improper cleaning is bad. Inhaling infected mouse poop/urine by crumbling it to dust and getting it into the air is one way to contract the extremely rare hantavirus.

    I'm also reading that even infected mouse excrement is only infectious for about a week.

    So what does that mean? This poop has been here for like 4-6 years now. Is it potentially still infectious? Like if I swat at it with a baseball bat and a giant cloud of mouse poop dust comes up and I snort it like poopaine, is it possible to catch hantavirus or not?

    I'm not going to do any of that, but I don't understand how to reconcile the unqualified "infectious for a week" and unqualified "don't improperly clean up mouse excrement" comments.

    Switch: SW-7690-2320-9238Steam/PSN/Xbox: Drezdar
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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    infectious for a week probably means "only lives for 7 days outside of the body" and "don't improperly clean up mouse excrement" means "open air flow, ventilators, gloves, goggles, and lots of cleaning supplies."

    Once you start moving it, you've already disturbed it. You said you cleaned some of it already. The chances of you having hanta virus infected mice is relatively small. The chances of it lasting 4-6 years is even smaller. Just be careful, wash skin that comes into contact with it thoroughly. Keep your eyes covered with goggles, and wear a respirator and gloves at all times while cleaning it.

    If you want to go nuts, get one of those hazardous material dupont suits, but a long sleeve shirt, jeans, boots, thick gloves, a mask, and a ventilator should be sufficient, so long as you wash and dispose of what's appropriate afterwords.

    Like I said, if you've lived with the live mice for so long, you've probably already come into contact with the feces on a regular basis.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    Captain MarcusCaptain Marcus now arrives the hour of actionRegistered User regular
    Hantavirus is mostly in the Southwest U.S. Bear in mind it's extremely rare (there were only 21 cases last year.) If you live in the desert, maybe. If you live in New York State, probably not.

    I'd still follow bowen's advice- inhaling feces (or getting it in your eyes) isn't good in any case. Goggles, gloves, mask.

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    Yeah I've done it by accident it is the kind of smell that just sticks in your nose for a week making everything taste like shit.

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    The EnderThe Ender Registered User regular
    Drez wrote: »
    I'm reading information that is a bit ambiguous. By the same source. Including the CDC.

    Supposedly, improper cleaning is bad. Inhaling infected mouse poop/urine by crumbling it to dust and getting it into the air is one way to contract the extremely rare hantavirus.

    I'm also reading that even infected mouse excrement is only infectious for about a week.

    So what does that mean? This poop has been here for like 4-6 years now. Is it potentially still infectious? Like if I swat at it with a baseball bat and a giant cloud of mouse poop dust comes up and I snort it like poopaine, is it possible to catch hantavirus or not?

    I'm not going to do any of that, but I don't understand how to reconcile the unqualified "infectious for a week" and unqualified "don't improperly clean up mouse excrement" comments.

    If the poop has been lying there for 4-6 years, it will not have any living viruses in it. Or anything else. It'll probably be akin to rock at this point.

    The warning is listed by the CDC because:

    1) There's no way you can reasonably tell how long it's actually been there. Maybe a mouse randomly strolled through last week and pooped where the old poop was.
    2) You always need to handle that material with care, even if it's not infectious. Inhaling dust particles is never a good thing, no matter what those particles are made of.

    With Love and Courage
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    RendRend Registered User regular
    I don't have any real advice for this, but can I just say, this is the Drez I know and love.

    Back to form. <3

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    tarnoktarnok Registered User regular
    If you have mouse shit around the boxes you almost certainly have it in the boxes as well and if any of those boxes contained paper they probably now contain shredded paper and mouse shit.

    Wii Code:
    0431-6094-6446-7088
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    tinwhiskerstinwhiskers Registered User regular
    tarnok wrote: »
    If you have mouse shit around the boxes you almost certainly have it in the boxes as well and if any of those boxes contained paper they probably now contain shredded paper and mouse shit.

    And going off my experience cleaning out my grandpa's basement there are probably going to be a decent number of mummified mice in there too.

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    GafotoGafoto Registered User regular
    Hanta isn't particularly common, but it's far more prevalent in certain areas of the US. If you're anywhere in the desert Southwest it can be a big concern. I wouldn't be worried if I aired out the house for a few days. UV light and some air movement are good things. Probably couldn't hurt you to use a respirator though. Not like you actually want to inhale a lot of dried mouse turds.

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