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cutting a hole in aluminium?

muninnmuninn Registered User regular
So I have a small piece of aluminum plate about 2-3 mm thick. This plate has a 6cm by 9cm rectangular hole in it, and I need to expand it by about 5 mm in one direction. I have a dremmel and a bunch of bits which I think it might do the work but I have no idea how to go about it. I need to retain the right angles in the corners, and have things as straight as possible.

What bits or tools would I need to accomplish it, and how do I go about it?

Does it make any sense?

Posts

  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    I think with aluminum, I'd go for a standard Dremel cutting wheel, a pair of safety goggles and a dusk mask.
    If you have a scriber tool (a small screwdriver will work in a pinch), use that to mark out exactly where you're cutting since pencil or marker can smudge, then just take your time and cut straight along the line.
    I think it'd be easiest to cut the edges up first (the 5 mm cuts). Maybe make several of them along the edge of the cut so you're taking smaller chunks out.
    Be prepared to replace the cutting disk though, they can tend to wear down pretty quickly.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
    zepherinschussNocren
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    If you have a sawzall available, a bimetal bit can make smooth cuts.

    DevoutlyApathetic
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    or just get a straight pair of snips and not have shards flying at your face

    camo_sig.png
  • zepherinzepherin Registered User regular
    mts wrote: »
    or just get a straight pair of snips and not have shards flying at your face
    If shards are flying at your face with a sawzall you need to change your bit.

  • see317see317 Registered User regular
    zepherin wrote: »
    If you have a sawzall available, a bimetal bit can make smooth cuts.

    Considering the size of the cut (5mm by a couple of centimeters) , i think a sawzall may be overkill. Snips might work but it might be hard to keep the corners clean.

    Ringo wrote: »
    Well except what see317 said. That guy's always wrong.
    zepherinDaenrisBouwsT
  • Forbe!Forbe! Registered User regular
    I'm a full time metal worker, and I do jewelry on the side, here is my opinion.

    2h8oFtZ.jpg

    Start by laying out your desired hole size with a square and a pencil or scribe.
    Drill two holes slightly away from the corners of your future rectangular hole.
    Use a coping saw to saw the sides, right into your drilled hole. Make sure you are sawing a slightly smaller hole than you want. The saw will leave an uneven kerf, no matter how good you are at sawing. A quick run over with a mill file will even out the sides.
    Use a file to clean up the edges and to square off your corners where the drill didn't cut.

    bv2ylq8pac8s.png
    tapeslingerUsagiShadowfire143999Al_watwrong_buttonNocrenBouwsTDevoutlyApatheticAldoMichaelLCzepherin
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