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Recommend me a bicycle!

RendRend Registered User regular
edited June 2015 in Help / Advice Forum
Alright so for once I think I know what I need. I am looking for a bike to ride approximately two miles to work every day. I figure this will come with tons of health benefits, as well as saving me a bit on gas and the need to find a parking spot.

-The total distance is a little over two miles.
-No hills (not significant anyway), entirely sidewalk
-Would like to ride most days, at least three, up to five, each week
-Don't mind fixed gear, if that's what works
-Preferred budget less than 400 bucks, but this is negotiable
-A thing to mount a basket on the back would be cool, so I could like take it to the grocery store too, or otherwise transport stuff without a backpack. This is preferred but not necessary
-Main goal is to get consistent exercise, if that's a factor.
-Preferred availability at a physical location

Also I am going to be getting a bike lock and a helmet at the same time. If additional safety equipment is recommended let me know.

Rend on
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Posts

  • NewblarNewblar Registered User regular
    Depending on where you live you may be fined for not having a bell or light. I rarely hear people use the bells but a light is pretty key for safety if you ever have to ride when it's dark out.

    Just a request as you said you will be riding on sidewalk so will be sharing space with pedestrians. Don't be a dick, accept that pedestrians don't have mirrors to see someone racing up behind them. Also check to make sure you're actually allowed to ride on the sidewalk, some cities don't allow this particularly in downtown town areas.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Julius
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited June 2015
    Fixed gear is just making things difficult for no good reason. There's no reason to buy one unless you're into the gimmick.

    My recommendation would be a hybrid (edit: as in, mountain/road hybrid, not an electric bike). They're sturdy, not too heavy, won't get flats too easily and you can get a decent one in the 300-400 range. You can ask at the shop for a rear pannier mount or similar.

    I'm not in the US so not sure what brands are readily available there, but Giants have always served me well.

    tynic on
    WassermeloneShimshaiSkeithdjmitchellachrishallett83QuidJebusUDXaquinIcemopper
  • ShimshaiShimshai Feeling flushed Registered User regular
    I've had a few Trek bikes in my time and they've always served me well, at least until they got stolen. Solid build quality and reasonably priced too. Pretty sure they're a US manufacturer so you can probably get a good deal on it.

    Get a helmet. Even if you're going to be mostly on sidewalks, it only takes one bad spill to do serious damage to yourself. You might be careful, but shit can happen so easily that's outside of your control. Some sort of high-visibilty vest or jacket is recommended.

    Be safe!

    Steam/Origin: Shimshai

    steam_sig.png
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    I'd recommend getting something off craigslist that fits. First go to a good shop and get an idea of styles and ride a few through the parking lot. Now find something that feels similar. Hybrids work if it's just commuting, but if you ever want to do extended rides they're not built for it. A "commuter" or similar roadbike with relaxed geometry (typically have fender bosses/disc brakes etc.) with some larger volume road tires is really the best thing going for commuting, as you can do longer rides with it as well if you really start enjoying cycling.

  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    edited June 2015
    I recommend a Diamondback Sorrento. Though I will admit it's been a while since I've owned one, I used to commute to work using one when I was younger and the hybrid style made it super-easy to take shortcuts through the local park using trails and such, while not being murder when having to peddle a hill or overpass on a main road. I recall it being pretty light, and costing about 400$ with the option of adding nicer "stuff" (I ended out getting bar extensions for steep inclines on dirt trails).

    Just doing a google search it looks like the 2015 version of the bike is still well liked.

    There's no need to get a 2015 though, should go to a real bike shop and ask the guy behind the counter. There's almost always someone selling a legitimate not stolen decent condition serviceable bike at a shop. I don't mean the k-mart huffy isle.

    Also, avoid places that only deal in used bikes and look like the employees all have a hankering for meth. They're less common now, but people still steal and unload bikes.

    Edit:

    You mention entirely sidewalk. Riding on the sidewalk is actually illegal in some areas. You may want to brush up on the laws for riding a bicycle as they do differ state to state and city to city.

    dispatch.o on
  • HollerHoller Registered User regular
    edited June 2016
    -

    Holler on
  • DjeetDjeet Registered User regular
    edited June 2015
    I'd look for previous year models of entry-level commuters. They may be a bit hard to come by this late in the season though; as new model year comes in they discount last years to clear out inventory. Last year in April I was able to get a Torker Graduate (previous year model) on deep discount at $425. A lot of bike for the money: 9 gears, disc brakes, commuter/cruiser riding position. Walk into a few local places and sit or test ride to get a feel of what kind of sizing and ride position works for you. Then walk into different shops and see if they have old stock commuters available (each shop tends to sell a certain sphere of brands, so you go to a few if you have a certain model in mind). You should be able to tell if the frame has braze-ons for racks or fenders just by looking at them; for a rear rack you'll see mounting points on the frame on the seat stays and near the rear dropouts.

    Edit: One advantage of buying from a shop is that usually they will throw in at least 1 full service (make sure everything is lubed, brake adjustment, smooth shifting, etc.) at 2-3 months out or recommended ride interval. You could keep to that or if you'd like to do the work yourself just be there when thy do initial setup and when the do the service (lots of online resources for that, and outside of truing wheels you typically do not need much specialized equipment).

    Djeet on
  • SkeithSkeith Registered User regular
    I have an older version of this one. It's treated me well over the years, and you can mount a rack on the back end or a basket on the handlebars if you want to. I used to get creative with some zip ties and a plastic crate on the back rack if I needed to carry groceries home.

    mts wrote: »
    heres how i see it being a total win situation for you
    1. stay with your wife while she dog sits. this wins husband points since she knows its out of your comfort zone
    2. have sex all over her friends house so that the next time you see her friend look at you condescendingly, you can wink back knowing you did the freaky deaky where she eats her cheerios.
  • WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    Fixed gear is just making things difficult for no good reason.

    Someone didn't do any SWEET skids as a kid!

    Will this be a long term thing? Like long enough to wear out a bike at some point?
    I was in a similar position years ago, and I just went to pawn shops and flea markets and stuff, bought a bunch of bikes in the 20$ range, and then took what was good and combined them into a single bike, and then had parts down the road, and now the knowledge to do something with them.

    They honestly pretty easy to pick up, I had zero help or prior knowledge, and just started taking them apart and putting them back together.

    Steam! Battlenet:Wisemantobes#1508
    BouwsT
  • AmarylAmaryl Registered User regular
    I'm not sure if they sell these types of bikes where you're from, but in the netherlands these are the stock and trade of commuting bikes across small distances :

    but what you'd want is a model like this:

    Bike for girls
    or
    Bike for boys

    (the difference being the cross-bar for boys, which makes it hard for girls with skirts to get off the bike easily)

    In the netherlands depending on brand and model, these go from 150 to 2000 euros... but again, not sure if its even possible for you to get this model, but if you can go for it.

  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Where are you located Rend? We can probably ferret out a few samples of used bikes to look at.
    Only other recommendations would be - invest in the points of contact for your bike, so make sure you get comfortable grips/gloves, a good saddle and good tires.
    For saddles, you actually want it to line up with your sit bones, so I'd recommend going to a shop that has a Specialized Ass-o-Meter (not kidding on the name) or similar to measure your sit bone width.

  • RendRend Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    Where are you located Rend? We can probably ferret out a few samples of used bikes to look at.
    Only other recommendations would be - invest in the points of contact for your bike, so make sure you get comfortable grips/gloves, a good saddle and good tires.
    For saddles, you actually want it to line up with your sit bones, so I'd recommend going to a shop that has a Specialized Ass-o-Meter (not kidding on the name) or similar to measure your sit bone width.

    San Diego!

    Also thanks to everyone for all the excellent responses so far, this is exactly what I was hoping to get from crowdsourcing this question.

  • SanderJKSanderJK Crocodylus Pontifex Sinterklasicus Madrid, 3000 ADRegistered User regular
    Single speeds are for going slow on flat terrain. The main advantage of a single speed bike is that they're a bit easier to maintain, since you don't have to learn how to deal with the gearing, and are less likely to derail because the gearchain is never moved. You see them a lot in the cities in the Netherlands, where bikes aren't treated very well so people like simple things that fail less often.

    A three speed would allow you to gain some extra top speed, so you move a bit faster, and a little bit easier around hills and getting off from intersections. They aren't very complicated, but they're not needed per se.

    The minimum demands I'd have for a second hand bicycle (And I spent about $150 on my last one)
    -It runs smoothly. The wheels run straight, the chain moves evenly (and without noise)
    -It's the right height. The saddle should be able to come to your hip, and steering wheel should be about the same height.
    -The tires are in a decent condition - They're the part that fails the most, and the most annoyingly.

    A bit of advice:
    If you want to go grocery shopping, consider something like
    l_23-bb-46.10-tas-duo-40-cm-grijs.jpg

    These start at about $25 over here. Because they are on either side of wheel you can balance the load. They also keep the centre of gravity lower.

    Especially in a place where it's not that common, be sure to buy some lights for the bike. Nowadays the most common thing is batteries/LEDs, which in my experience run for about a year. They're pretty cheap.

    Steam: SanderJK Origin: SanderJK
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Something like this (not sure on the size, as a 5'6" person on a 55cm bike should be in hell) is what I'd look for:
    http://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1673224/

  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    Two miles is nothing on a bicycle so anything will do. Since you want to use it for commuting then what really matters is something that just works, so go for something simple and with tires that are not too skinny as bigger tires means less risk of punctures.

    I'd say find a 2nd hand bike to see if it works out as you imagine. Buy something for like $200 or so and you should then be able to sell it on for a similar amount if you find riding so much fun you want something more fancy - maybe even for longer leisure rides.

    Bones heal, glory is forever.
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    Skeith wrote: »
    I have an older version of this one. It's treated me well over the years, and you can mount a rack on the back end or a basket on the handlebars if you want to. I used to get creative with some zip ties and a plastic crate on the back rack if I needed to carry groceries home.

    A Sedona is a very comfortable bike to ride. You won't win the Tour de France on it, but you also won't hate riding it more than a couple of miles.

    tynicSkeith
  • RendRend Registered User regular
    Skeith wrote: »
    I have an older version of this one. It's treated me well over the years, and you can mount a rack on the back end or a basket on the handlebars if you want to. I used to get creative with some zip ties and a plastic crate on the back rack if I needed to carry groceries home.

    A Sedona is a very comfortable bike to ride. You won't win the Tour de France on it, but you also won't hate riding it more than a couple of miles.

    I am looking at this bike precisely. Several people in this thread have recommended Giant as a brand, and hybrid as the type, which is pretty much exactly what I was looking for: a brand and type recommendation.

    According to google maps the distance to my work is ~2 miles. Since I'm doing this for my health, I'm thinking each time I ride to and from work I can ride a little bit in the other direction and then turn around, boosting it to a total of 4 miles for a trip, and doubling the travel time from 10m to 20m. I figure 10m twice a day is going to give me many fewer benefits than 20m twice a day, and the addition of another 10 minutes isn't that big a deal since I'm not in traffic at the time, and riding a bike is a pretty fun activity just by itself.

    If I decide to make a grocery run on it that's going to be less than a mile total, so most of it will be waiting on lights to get me across the two intersections I need to traverse to arrive at the grocery store.

    Bike shop opens today at 10, pretty sure I'm going to be there when it opens. Will update when my dark work is complete.

    BouwsT
  • RendRend Registered User regular
    Alright so, problem: Bike does not fit into my trunk :p

    That being said, it's only 8 miles from my place to the bike shop, so I was thinking I could get my gf to drop me off at the shop and then I just ride it home. According to google that's a 45m ride, and I feel like I could probably do it. It's flat enough I think.

    Having my first ride with this thing be an 8 mile ride home: Good idea or bad idea?

  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited June 2015
    probably no big deal, but your butt might be sore tomorrow.

    edit: make sure you get them to adjust the seat and handlebars properly at the shop, that'll make things easier for you.

    tynic on
    Rendchrishallett83QuidSkeith
  • RendRend Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    probably no big deal, but your butt might be sore tomorrow.

    edit: make sure you get them to adjust the seat and handlebars properly at the shop, that'll make things easier for you.

    Just as you guys all mentioned, the guy at the bike shop was one of the most helpful customer service reps I have ever interacted with. Evidently bike shop guys are universally helpful.

    Shimshaidispatch.ochrishallett83jjae2123
  • dispatch.odispatch.o Registered User regular
    Rend wrote: »
    Alright so, problem: Bike does not fit into my trunk :p

    That being said, it's only 8 miles from my place to the bike shop, so I was thinking I could get my gf to drop me off at the shop and then I just ride it home. According to google that's a 45m ride, and I feel like I could probably do it. It's flat enough I think.

    Having my first ride with this thing be an 8 mile ride home: Good idea or bad idea?

    Normally you can remove the front tire/rim and make em fit. Also, you can take the bus. There's a rack on the front.

    8 miles with rest for you butt at lights shouldn't be bad at all.

    schuss
  • djmitchelladjmitchella Registered User regular
    Just make sure you think through the route and if/where you'll have to deal with traffic, because that can be surprising the first times you do it. You can always get off and walk it across at intersections as if you were a pedestrian, if it comes to it.

  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Hi! Registered User regular
    Rend wrote: »
    tynic wrote: »
    probably no big deal, but your butt might be sore tomorrow.

    edit: make sure you get them to adjust the seat and handlebars properly at the shop, that'll make things easier for you.

    Just as you guys all mentioned, the guy at the bike shop was one of the most helpful customer service reps I have ever interacted with. Evidently bike shop guys are universally helpful.

    There is almost zero money to be made in bike stores. The vast majority of bicycles are sold through department and toy stores, the market share of local bike shops must be in the single digits at most. Hence, the people that own and work in bike shops tend to be very keen cyclists who want everybody else to love cycling as much as they do. That's why they will usually fall all over themselves to try and help you.

  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    There is almost zero money to be made in bike stores. The vast majority of bicycles are sold through department and toy stores, the market share of local bike shops must be in the single digits at most. Hence, the people that own and work in bike shops tend to be very keen cyclists who want everybody else to love cycling as much as they do. That's why they will usually fall all over themselves to try and help you.

    That + cyclists are normally good people all round :biggrin:

    Or if being cynical. Bike shops rely very much on selling service, spare parts and extra gear and of course they want people to go to them for all that.

    Bones heal, glory is forever.
  • LoveIsUnityLoveIsUnity Registered User regular
    There is almost zero money to be made in bike stores. The vast majority of bicycles are sold through department and toy stores, the market share of local bike shops must be in the single digits at most. Hence, the people that own and work in bike shops tend to be very keen cyclists who want everybody else to love cycling as much as they do. That's why they will usually fall all over themselves to try and help you.

    That + cyclists are normally good people all round :biggrin:

    Or if being cynical. Bike shops rely very much on selling service, spare parts and extra gear and of course they want people to go to them for all that.

    One thing I've noticed after turning into a bike person is that other bike people want to help you out. If you don't know how to fix a flat or change the grips on your handlebars or whatever, people are usually good about teaching you. I used to freak out about oiling the chain and basic maintenance, but people were really good about teaching me. It's awesome.

    steam_sig.png
    tynicQuid
  • SanderJKSanderJK Crocodylus Pontifex Sinterklasicus Madrid, 3000 ADRegistered User regular
    Was thinking about this, and one more tip:

    Consider getting a lock like this:
    axa-defender-met-ketting.png

    I really like this type. You can just use the lock that goes through the wheel to lock it quickly, or you can chain it to something with a bit more effort. The main advantage is that it's one key.

    Steam: SanderJK Origin: SanderJK
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Rend wrote: »
    Alright so, problem: Bike does not fit into my trunk :p

    That being said, it's only 8 miles from my place to the bike shop, so I was thinking I could get my gf to drop me off at the shop and then I just ride it home. According to google that's a 45m ride, and I feel like I could probably do it. It's flat enough I think.

    Having my first ride with this thing be an 8 mile ride home: Good idea or bad idea?

    Obviously too late to help with this particular issue, but do your wheels have quick releases? My bike fits in the back of any compact car so long as I pop the front wheel off. It's a handy thing to know how to do, especially if you're riding out to meet someone with a car.

    tynic
  • RendRend Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Rend wrote: »
    Alright so, problem: Bike does not fit into my trunk :p

    That being said, it's only 8 miles from my place to the bike shop, so I was thinking I could get my gf to drop me off at the shop and then I just ride it home. According to google that's a 45m ride, and I feel like I could probably do it. It's flat enough I think.

    Having my first ride with this thing be an 8 mile ride home: Good idea or bad idea?

    Obviously too late to help with this particular issue, but do your wheels have quick releases? My bike fits in the back of any compact car so long as I pop the front wheel off. It's a handy thing to know how to do, especially if you're riding out to meet someone with a car.

    No, the bike I chose has wheels that are not easily detachable. That being said, bike shop opens in just a couple hours, gonna have my girlfriend drive me down there and then I'll ride back home in time for lunch!
    JPEG evidence will be incoming at that time.

    BouwsTQuid
  • RendRend Registered User regular
    Holy whoa, that ride was significantly harder than I thought it would be.

    Took me probably an hour or more; I made it though, and now I have a bicycle to call my own! Thankfully the ride to work should be significantly easier, and only a quarter as long. With any luck I'll build up some stamina and then I'll take the scenic route every day. For today, my initiation is done though.

    Pictured: Me, post 8-mile ride, with attire completely and totally unfit for the ride.
    6id6fa55zy0i.jpg

    dispatch.oBouwsTjoshgotrodjmitchellaschusstynicQuidchrishallett83SiskaFearghaillDarkewolfeSanguineAngelIcemopperJebusUDSkeithNijaTheBlackWindjjae2123
  • FearghaillFearghaill If there is nothing but what we make in this world let us make goodRegistered User regular
    on a scale of 1 to "holding onto the bike is the only reason I'm standing" how rubbery were your legs when you got home?

    DarkewolfeDaenrisSkeith
  • BlindZenDriverBlindZenDriver Registered User regular
    Congratulations. You will not regret taking the plunge and real soon an 8 mile trip will be easy.

    Also:
    "When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race."
    H.G. Wells

    Bones heal, glory is forever.
  • RendRend Registered User regular
    I rode into work today! My butt didn't feel sore from the ride on Friday over the weekend, but it sure did today. I'm pretty sure that's spectral pain, where pain that has already lived and died comes back to haunt you at the place of its death.

    Trust me, I'm an occultist.

    But, yeah, first day riding into work. A bit of a light sprinkle, was actually somewhat refreshing, though hopefully it's not too ridiculous later today or else I might just have to wait out the rain at work. Legs are only a fraction as rubbery as they were when I arrived home from the first ride.

    People who drive cars are dangerous douchebags.

    All in all: This is gonna be pretty great.

    QuidDarkewolfeIrukaHollerchrishallett83
  • hsuhsu Registered User regular
    If your butt remains sore, even after a few weeks of riding, look for a new seat.

    My preference is a firm, almost unpadded, narrow, pleather seat. I actually prefer narrow, tensioned leather seats, but I never remember to maintain them properly on a yearly basis, so they breakdown on me during the winter storage.

    iTNdmYl.png
  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    Best thing I can say about riding on the street with motorists is to know your rights, and be willing to take the full lane if you need to. Drivers should not pass within 3 feet of you for safety reasons, and if you ride on the side of the road, they're much more willing to pass when it is not completely safe. I take the full lane almost all the time, simply because we don't have adequate dedicated bike lanes here, and drivers will not pass me if I'm in the way. They hate me, and I feel bad, but I'm still alive today!

    In terms of butt soreness, it could hurt for upwards of 2 weeks in just getting used to the new thing goin' on. If it feels like skin or muscle soreness, that will probably go away, but if it feels like bone aches, you might want to adjust the saddle height.

    All in all, good luck! You seem to have a load of great advice already, and you're obviously inspired to keep riding, so that's great! I've been a commuter through rain and snow the past 3 years now, and I wouldn't give it up for anything. I hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

    RendDarkewolfe
  • LoveIsUnityLoveIsUnity Registered User regular
    Icemopper wrote: »
    Best thing I can say about riding on the street with motorists is to know your rights, and be willing to take the full lane if you need to. Drivers should not pass within 3 feet of you for safety reasons, and if you ride on the side of the road, they're much more willing to pass when it is not completely safe. I take the full lane almost all the time, simply because we don't have adequate dedicated bike lanes here, and drivers will not pass me if I'm in the way. They hate me, and I feel bad, but I'm still alive today!

    In terms of butt soreness, it could hurt for upwards of 2 weeks in just getting used to the new thing goin' on. If it feels like skin or muscle soreness, that will probably go away, but if it feels like bone aches, you might want to adjust the saddle height.

    All in all, good luck! You seem to have a load of great advice already, and you're obviously inspired to keep riding, so that's great! I've been a commuter through rain and snow the past 3 years now, and I wouldn't give it up for anything. I hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

    This is good advice. If things start to get really dicey you can consider a go pro camera to record people being fuckfaces. I have been pretty lucky with people being willfully malicious, but I've had some close calls from people not paying attention.

    On a related note: make sure your helmet fits properly. It's not going to help you too much if you go under the wheels, but you'll be in a hell of a lot better shape if you end up taking a spill over your handlebars.

    Seriously, though, you are doing a good thing by not riding on the sidewalk. It's true that the road is dangerous for cyclists, but pedestrians are killed every year because some asshole thought they could ride on the sidewalk.

    steam_sig.png
  • SkeithSkeith Registered User regular
    Icemopper wrote: »
    Best thing I can say about riding on the street with motorists is to know your rights, and be willing to take the full lane if you need to. Drivers should not pass within 3 feet of you for safety reasons, and if you ride on the side of the road, they're much more willing to pass when it is not completely safe. I take the full lane almost all the time, simply because we don't have adequate dedicated bike lanes here, and drivers will not pass me if I'm in the way. They hate me, and I feel bad, but I'm still alive today!

    In terms of butt soreness, it could hurt for upwards of 2 weeks in just getting used to the new thing goin' on. If it feels like skin or muscle soreness, that will probably go away, but if it feels like bone aches, you might want to adjust the saddle height.

    All in all, good luck! You seem to have a load of great advice already, and you're obviously inspired to keep riding, so that's great! I've been a commuter through rain and snow the past 3 years now, and I wouldn't give it up for anything. I hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

    On top of this, if you do find yourself getting sore you could ride standing on the pedals for a bit, the way you'd want to take a hill.

    mts wrote: »
    heres how i see it being a total win situation for you
    1. stay with your wife while she dog sits. this wins husband points since she knows its out of your comfort zone
    2. have sex all over her friends house so that the next time you see her friend look at you condescendingly, you can wink back knowing you did the freaky deaky where she eats her cheerios.
  • WiseManTobesWiseManTobes Registered User regular
    Man, these last few posts make me glad I live in a kinda shitty smallish town, no bike lanes, but it doesn't matter, you can usually cut across a field or offroad much easier and quicker anyway.

    And since that's the commonplace way, there's always a premade trail of some sort everywhere.

    Steam! Battlenet:Wisemantobes#1508
  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    edited July 2015
    Seriously, though, you are doing a good thing by not riding on the sidewalk. It's true that the road is dangerous for cyclists, but pedestrians are killed every year because some asshole thought they could ride on the sidewalk.

    Not just that, but if you come to an intersection on a sidewalk, you are in much more danger to cross at any speed above walking because motorists do not expect a cyclist to cross over the sidewalk. The most important thing you can do is be predictable, this way motorists can be ready for any action you might take. If you hold your arms out to announce turns, they'll at least figure out that you're doing something different.

    Same with red lights and stop signs. Running a red light is extremely dangerous, same with stop signs. Every driver coasts through a stop sign now and then, you do not want to be on their hood because of it. I've been hit because a driver neglected to pay attention when they came to a stop sign. But they would have hit anything in their path, I was not hit because I was a cyclist. I mean, flashing lights and a bright reflective vest aren't visible enough? You've gotta be kidding!

    Now I know this is all scary and doom and gloom and stuff, but honestly, cycling is the second best thing that's ever happened to me after meeting my wife. If you are safe and predictable, you'll have lots of fun pissing off motorists everywhere! (I kid, they love us)

    Icemopper on
    LoveIsUnitySkeith
  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    In reference to what @Icemopper said - know all the rules of the road, but also recognize when it is safer to blow a stop sign or walk your bike on the sidewalk vs. going by the letter of the law. It's better to be a little wrong and alive than right and hurt or dead, and I can share with you that finding liability on a driver when you're hit on a bicycle is an uphill battle. Stay safe.

    IcemopperLoveIsUnity
  • IcemopperIcemopper Registered User regular
    schuss wrote: »
    In reference to what @Icemopper said - know all the rules of the road, but also recognize when it is safer to blow a stop sign or walk your bike on the sidewalk vs. going by the letter of the law. It's better to be a little wrong and alive than right and hurt or dead, and I can share with you that finding liability on a driver when you're hit on a bicycle is an uphill battle. Stay safe.

    There's certainly times where judgment will give you the best call, but I still wouldn't recommend just blowing through a stop sign. Just my opinion.

    In terms of finding liability, you're absolutely right. Get a friend or witness to take pictures of any incident, and make detailed notes on the situation if anything occurs. You don't want to jump up yourself and start snapping photos with adrenaline or shock possibly masking injuries. But most of the time, you are seen as a vehicle that is held to the letter of the law. If you blow a stop sign and get hit, that is your fault. When I got hit, the driver was cited merely for failure to yield at an intersection, instead of what I suggested which was somewhat more vulgar.

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