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Windows 8.1 Sleep Troubles

So, I built a PC for the first time several months ago, and it's worked great, save for an issue with the sleep mode.

At first, all the fans would stay on indefinitely while the PC was in sleep mode, but it would wake up with no trouble, using the mouse/keyboard.

Then, I changed the power mode from S1 to S3 in BIOS. After that, the fans would turn off while the computer was in sleep mode, but it couldn't be woken up by the mouse or keyboard, only the power button. More importantly, when it comes out of sleep mode, it instantly crashes, and has to go through the whole start-up procedure.

I've tried updating the drivers, tweaking advanced power options, etc. but I've yet to find a solution. It seems to be a fairly common problem, but it also seems to be one with dozens of answers, and I've yet to find one that works.

Motherboard: MSI 760GMA-P34 (FX)
CPU: AMD FX-6300
GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 750
PSU: Antec VP-450
RAM: Ballistix Sport 8GB DDR3

Any help would be appreciated. I've been digging through tech blogs and forums off and on for a few months now without finding an answer.

Posts

  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    Is not using sleep mode an option? Sleep mode just doesn't work well with some hardware configurations, and there may not be much you can do to fix it.

    Le_Goat
  • Le_GoatLe_Goat Frechified Goat Person BostonRegistered User regular
    As a personal rule, I never enable sleep. Even after all of these years, sleep can still cause problems.

    Now with your specific issues, can you give us more information about the crashes? Are you getting BSODs? Are there any events in the eventvwr? Those things will help to narrow down the issue.

    Going by your specs, you really need a larger PSU. 450W is low, especially considering you have a GPU that requires a 300W PSU alone; 450W is for a basic setup without much added to the system (e.g. a non-integrated video card). Before you go spending money on this theory, see if you can borrow a larger PSU to determine if that is indeed what is causing you the problem.

    If the issue really is with the PSU, I recommend getting a much larger PSU, like a 750 or even a 1,000. The rationale behind this is to future-proof your PC. Otherwise, you'll run into the same issue here where you'll add new hardware that requires more power than you currently have, meaning you'll have to buy another PSU and toss the other one. Just a suggestion.

    While I agree that being insensitive is an issue, so is being oversensitive.
  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    edited September 2015
    Le_Goat wrote: »
    As a personal rule, I never enable sleep. Even after all of these years, sleep can still cause problems.

    Now with your specific issues, can you give us more information about the crashes? Are you getting BSODs? Are there any events in the eventvwr? Those things will help to narrow down the issue.

    Going by your specs, you really need a larger PSU. 450W is low, especially considering you have a GPU that requires a 300W PSU alone; 450W is for a basic setup without much added to the system (e.g. a non-integrated video card). Before you go spending money on this theory, see if you can borrow a larger PSU to determine if that is indeed what is causing you the problem.

    If the issue really is with the PSU, I recommend getting a much larger PSU, like a 750 or even a 1,000. The rationale behind this is to future-proof your PC. Otherwise, you'll run into the same issue here where you'll add new hardware that requires more power than you currently have, meaning you'll have to buy another PSU and toss the other one. Just a suggestion.

    Yeah, I just get the standard, "Your PC ran into a problem and needs to restart," message.

    It looks like I have a few things reoccurring in the eventvwr log. Bear in mind I'm a luddite, so other than Googling this stuff, I have no idea what standard errors are, so this is mostly just gibberish to me. Again, just from looking at different tech forums and such, most of them seem pretty common, but being a luddite, I have no idea if any of these would actually cause the issue I'm having.

    Source: Microsoft-Windows-Time-Service
    NtpClient was unable to set a manual peer to use as a time source because of DNS resolution error on 'time.windows.com,0x9'. NtpClient will try again in 15 minutes and double the reattempt interval thereafter. The error was: No such host is known.

    Source: Microsoft-Windows-DistributedCOM
    The server did not register with DCOM within the required timeout.

    Source: Microsoft-Windows-DeviceSetupManager
    Metadata staging failed, for container '0x80070490'

    Source: UASPStor
    Reset to device, \Device\RaidPort0, was issued.

    If I can't solve it, I'll definitely look into the PSU issue.

    Munch on
  • LD50LD50 Registered User regular
    edited September 2015
    The time service bit isn't anything important. Nothing that would actually break anything.

    The DCOM error is pretty nonspecific. It's hard to say what is breaking without knowing what server/service timed out. It doesn't seem like a COM object would cause a crash on sleep, but who knows.

    The DeviceSetupManager error is a problem with windows update. Not something that would keep you from being able to wake from sleep, but something you might want to look into fixing as it is probably keeping you from getting updates. You can try following the instructions here to fix the problem.

    UASPStor means that it's related to a USB attached drive. Try duplicating the crash-on-wake without any USB storage plugged in. That error shouldn't be fatal, but sleep is a finicky thing, so who knows.

    LD50 on
  • Le_GoatLe_Goat Frechified Goat Person BostonRegistered User regular
    edited September 2015
    So I'll be honest: since I never use sleep, I never really looked into the differences between sleep modes (S0-S5). After looking them over, another possible issue you have here is with your RAM. S3 turns off the CPU and puts the RAM in slow refresh. If you have a bad stick, maybe that could be it? Then again, if you had a bad stick, I'd imagine that you would have received a BSOD by now.

    What you can do to rule that out is run the Windows memory test. Hit the Start button and type mdsched.exe. Open the tool and select the Restart now and check for problems (recommended) option; make sure everything else is close first, obviously. Windows will reboot and perform the memory test. If that passes, then it's not that option.

    Another idea is to set it to S4 (hibernate). It'll turn off all hardware and save the state as a file, which it will use when you boot up again. If it crashes there as well, then we might be back at the power issue.

    Le_Goat on
    While I agree that being insensitive is an issue, so is being oversensitive.
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