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Penny Arcade - Comic - Elevenses

DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
edited July 2016 in The Penny Arcade Hub

imagePenny Arcade - Comic - Elevenses

Videogaming-related online strip by Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins. Includes news and commentary.

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    DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    Improper use of colloquialisms is the worst.

    I have this argument with my wife every few months.

    A "couple" means two.
    A "few" means three.
    "Several" is four or more, up to not more than six.
    More than six and you have to move on to "many".

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    briguybriguy Registered User regular
    edited July 2016
    I consider 11 the afternoon.
    I have never considered after noon part until now.

    briguy on
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    Skull2185Skull2185 Registered User regular
    Ohhhhh shit, character growth! Tycho no longer needs full body protection and spaceman helmet to venture out into the summertime world.

    Technically 11AM today is afternoon from yesterday. Bam! It's like the whole Gremlins problem, it's always after midnight somewhere. My Mogwai never make it more than a few weeks before I have to bury them in the backyard in a shoebox :(

    Everyone has a price. Throw enough gold around and someone will risk disintegration.
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    LucascraftLucascraft Registered User regular
    edited July 2016
    From a pure words standpoint, afternoon is a somewhat unique and funny term when you consider it against all of our other time-words.

    You've got morning, which describes the time of day before noon, from sunrise to noon.

    Then you've got noon, which marks mid-day and the end of morning.

    Then you've got afternoon, which is a somewhat ambiguous term that just means sometime after mid-day but before evening starts.

    Then you have evening, which generally means the later hours of the day that still has daylight.

    You've got night, which is a general term for when it's dark outside.

    Midnight is the opposite of noon and indicates the end of the day and the mid-point in the night cycle.


    But there's no such thing as aftermidnight. You just have more night. Night exists on both sides of midnight. Whereas with noon, morning exists before it and afternoon exists after it.

    Lucascraft on
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    EnlongEnlong Registered User regular
    Does he mean literally afternoon, or literally afternoon?

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    ShowsniShowsni Registered User regular
    The real question is where afternoon ends and evening begins. Does afternoon ever end? I'd agree with Tycho, though; afternoon is very clearly after noon, and never before it, on a particular day.
    You've got morning, which describes the time of day before noon, from sunrise to noon.

    I'd say morning can sometimes refer to any time between midnight and noon. The early hours of the morning. It was two in the morning. That kind of thing. So, day is sunrise to sunset; night is sunset to sunrise; morning is midnight to noon; and afternoon is noon to midnight?

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    TrygylTrygyl Registered User regular
    Ever since I was a young'n, I've never considered it the next day until a.) I woke up from sleep or b.) 5 A.M. rolled around, so I can kind of understand where he's coming from

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    kbeems25kbeems25 Registered User regular
    I can't EVEN....

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    FireballDragonFireballDragon Registered User regular
    I feel this on SUCH a personal level. Although Tycho himself has misused the word "literally" before.

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    EnlongEnlong Registered User regular
    What really bugs me about afternoon is noon being 12:00 PM. We really couldn't have picked a less-intuitive way to do that. Noon should be 12:00 AM or 0:00 PM.

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    joshofalltradesjoshofalltrades Class Traitor Smoke-filled roomRegistered User regular
    Gonna have to side with Tycho on this one.

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    ArtoriaArtoria Registered User regular
    I always call it 11 in the morning because it is before noon. Not sure how you can call it anything else.

    I classify time like this.

    4:00AM - 11:59AM = morning

    12:00PM - 12:59PM = Noon

    1:00PM - 5:59 = Afternoon

    6:00 PM - 3:59AM = night

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    darkmayodarkmayo Registered User regular
    Skull2185 wrote: »
    Ohhhhh shit, character growth! Tycho no longer needs full body protection and spaceman helmet to venture out into the summertime world.

    Technically 11AM today is afternoon from yesterday. Bam! It's like the whole Gremlins problem, it's always after midnight somewhere. My Mogwai never make it more than a few weeks before I have to bury them in the backyard in a shoebox :(

    Good old Gremlins 2 , so what if he crosses a time zone.

    Switch SW-6182-1526-0041
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    fortyforty Registered User regular
    Dhalphir wrote: »
    Improper use of colloquialisms is the worst.

    I have this argument with my wife every few months.

    A "couple" means two.
    A "few" means three.
    "Several" is four or more, up to not more than six.
    More than six and you have to move on to "many".
    Or "pack."

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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    Dhalphir wrote: »
    Improper use of colloquialisms is the worst.

    I have this argument with my wife every few months.

    A "couple" means two.
    A "few" means three.
    "Several" is four or more, up to not more than six.
    More than six and you have to move on to "many".

    I'm usually pretty strict about these things myself. But for some reason I've always held that "couple" can be two or three. Maybe it's because "two and two alone" already has a word, "pair". Also, fun fact! In Hebrew, there's a distinct plural suffix for two of something that comes in twos, like hands.

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    YoungFreyYoungFrey Registered User regular
    Dhalphir wrote: »
    Improper use of colloquialisms is the worst.

    I have this argument with my wife every few months.

    A "couple" means two.
    A "few" means three.
    "Several" is four or more, up to not more than six.
    More than six and you have to move on to "many".

    I'm usually pretty strict about these things myself. But for some reason I've always held that "couple" can be two or three. Maybe it's because "two and two alone" already has a word, "pair". Also, fun fact! In Hebrew, there's a distinct plural suffix for two of something that comes in twos, like hands.

    "Brace" means 2 also, but that doesn't make other words for 2 change. English has a lot of synonyms.

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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    YoungFrey wrote: »
    Dhalphir wrote: »
    Improper use of colloquialisms is the worst.

    I have this argument with my wife every few months.

    A "couple" means two.
    A "few" means three.
    "Several" is four or more, up to not more than six.
    More than six and you have to move on to "many".

    I'm usually pretty strict about these things myself. But for some reason I've always held that "couple" can be two or three. Maybe it's because "two and two alone" already has a word, "pair". Also, fun fact! In Hebrew, there's a distinct plural suffix for two of something that comes in twos, like hands.

    "Brace" means 2 also, but that doesn't make other words for 2 change. English has a lot of synonyms.

    True, but we're talking about parlance more than definition. By definition, couple does not have to mean only two. If someone asked for a couple Cheetos I may give them three. It's an informal term. Now, I'm normally pretty anal about this sort of thing but for whatever reason I never had a problem with couple and few being interchangeable.

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    Skull2185Skull2185 Registered User regular
    Man, you're stingy with them cheetos...

    Everyone has a price. Throw enough gold around and someone will risk disintegration.
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    YoungFreyYoungFrey Registered User regular
    edited July 2016
    <never mind>

    YoungFrey on
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    jothkijothki Registered User regular
    Myself, I tend to consider 1 to still be the morning.

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    fortyforty Registered User regular
    YoungFrey wrote: »
    Dhalphir wrote: »
    Improper use of colloquialisms is the worst.

    I have this argument with my wife every few months.

    A "couple" means two.
    A "few" means three.
    "Several" is four or more, up to not more than six.
    More than six and you have to move on to "many".

    I'm usually pretty strict about these things myself. But for some reason I've always held that "couple" can be two or three. Maybe it's because "two and two alone" already has a word, "pair". Also, fun fact! In Hebrew, there's a distinct plural suffix for two of something that comes in twos, like hands.

    "Brace" means 2 also, but that doesn't make other words for 2 change. English has a lot of synonyms.

    True, but we're talking about parlance more than definition. By definition, couple does not have to mean only two. If someone asked for a couple Cheetos I may give them three. It's an informal term. Now, I'm normally pretty anal about this sort of thing but for whatever reason I never had a problem with couple and few being interchangeable.
    "Relax, honey. It's OK that I invited this woman I met at the bar into bed with us. A 'couple' can be more than two. *wink*"

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    jwalkjwalk Registered User regular
    edited July 2016
    like when my wife says I came home too late last night.
    I say no I didn't, honey, I came home early this morning.

    jwalk on
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    SwashbucklerXXSwashbucklerXX Swashbucklin' Canuck Registered User regular
    I'm just sad after clicking on the title that this wasn't a Stranger Things comic.

    Want to find me on a gaming service? I'm SwashbucklerXX everywhere.
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    DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    Lucascraft wrote: »
    But there's no such thing as aftermidnight. You just have more night. Night exists on both sides of midnight. Whereas with noon, morning exists before it and afternoon exists after it.

    This just isn't true though. How would you describe 2am in words? Right, "two in the morning."

    Nobody says "two oclock at night". Except savages.

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    SorceSorce Not ThereRegistered User regular
    Dhalphir wrote: »
    Improper use of colloquialisms is the worst.

    I have this argument with my wife every few months.

    A "couple" means two.
    A "few" means three.
    "Several" is four or more, up to not more than six.
    More than six and you have to move on to "many".
    I'm a bit more generous.

    Couple = Two
    Few = Three to Four, maybe Five.
    Several = Six or Seven.
    A lot = Above that.

    sig.gif
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    wallywestwallywest Registered User regular
    This thread gave me a headache. Thanks.

    I work weird hours, which has on occasion caused "issues". I start at 1am. In the fucking morning. Some people, like a certain employee that we'll call Dumbass, seems to think that 1am is simply part of the night-time. A time where dreams and occasional half lucid trips to the bathroom happen, and not much else. So Dumbass takes a job where he starts at 1-in-the-night (to his way of thinking). So when I say he starts on Tuesday, he of course doesn't show up. When I call him at 1:30am on TUESDAY I hear a partially awake person saying "WTF mate?" on the other end. He naturally thought that he started Tuesday night, which would actually be Wednesday morning for people who know how a clock works.

    *sigh*

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    Hawk oneHawk one Registered User regular
    Showsni wrote: »
    The real question is where afternoon ends and evening begins. Does afternoon ever end? I'd agree with Tycho, though; afternoon is very clearly after noon, and never before it, on a particular day.
    You've got morning, which describes the time of day before noon, from sunrise to noon.

    I'd say morning can sometimes refer to any time between midnight and noon. The early hours of the morning. It was two in the morning. That kind of thing. So, day is sunrise to sunset; night is sunset to sunrise; morning is midnight to noon; and afternoon is noon to midnight?

    Personally, I think "morning" is used stupidly in the English language. I mean, why is it supposed to describe the entire period between midnight and noon, considering how the beginning and end of this period is as different as... Well, as day and night? -And- overlapping with the word "night" at that? Silly, just plain silly.

    In Norwegian, the word "morgen" (pretty sure you can see what that translates directly as) is described as the period shortly before dawn until a few hours afterwards. Then there is the word "formiddag", which would translate as "premidday", or "prenoon". That's right, there is a specific word for that period of time! We then have "ettermiddag" (afternoon), "kveld" (evening), and "natt" (night). And in this system, 01:00 (yeah, we use the 24-hour standard too, at least in writing) is the middle of the night, end of story. No overlap there. So much neater for everyone involved.

    But signatures don't really work, do they?
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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    Hawk one wrote: »
    Showsni wrote: »
    The real question is where afternoon ends and evening begins. Does afternoon ever end? I'd agree with Tycho, though; afternoon is very clearly after noon, and never before it, on a particular day.
    You've got morning, which describes the time of day before noon, from sunrise to noon.

    I'd say morning can sometimes refer to any time between midnight and noon. The early hours of the morning. It was two in the morning. That kind of thing. So, day is sunrise to sunset; night is sunset to sunrise; morning is midnight to noon; and afternoon is noon to midnight?

    Personally, I think "morning" is used stupidly in the English language. I mean, why is it supposed to describe the entire period between midnight and noon, considering how the beginning and end of this period is as different as... Well, as day and night? -And- overlapping with the word "night" at that? Silly, just plain silly.

    In Norwegian, the word "morgen" (pretty sure you can see what that translates directly as) is described as the period shortly before dawn until a few hours afterwards. Then there is the word "formiddag", which would translate as "premidday", or "prenoon". That's right, there is a specific word for that period of time! We then have "ettermiddag" (afternoon), "kveld" (evening), and "natt" (night). And in this system, 01:00 (yeah, we use the 24-hour standard too, at least in writing) is the middle of the night, end of story. No overlap there. So much neater for everyone involved.

    And as an added bonus, all of those sound like excellent times to go slay a sea wyrm. Does English sound as cool to any other native speakers as every other language sounds to me? I feel like I got a raw deal here.

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    ziddersroofurryziddersroofurry Registered User regular
    I call 11 A.M. 'second breakfast'.

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    fortyforty Registered User regular
    Hawk one wrote: »
    Showsni wrote: »
    The real question is where afternoon ends and evening begins. Does afternoon ever end? I'd agree with Tycho, though; afternoon is very clearly after noon, and never before it, on a particular day.
    You've got morning, which describes the time of day before noon, from sunrise to noon.

    I'd say morning can sometimes refer to any time between midnight and noon. The early hours of the morning. It was two in the morning. That kind of thing. So, day is sunrise to sunset; night is sunset to sunrise; morning is midnight to noon; and afternoon is noon to midnight?

    Personally, I think "morning" is used stupidly in the English language. I mean, why is it supposed to describe the entire period between midnight and noon, considering how the beginning and end of this period is as different as... Well, as day and night? -And- overlapping with the word "night" at that? Silly, just plain silly.

    In Norwegian, the word "morgen" (pretty sure you can see what that translates directly as) is described as the period shortly before dawn until a few hours afterwards. Then there is the word "formiddag", which would translate as "premidday", or "prenoon". That's right, there is a specific word for that period of time! We then have "ettermiddag" (afternoon), "kveld" (evening), and "natt" (night). And in this system, 01:00 (yeah, we use the 24-hour standard too, at least in writing) is the middle of the night, end of story. No overlap there. So much neater for everyone involved.

    And as an added bonus, all of those sound like excellent times to go slay a sea wyrm. Does English sound as cool to any other native speakers as every other language sounds to me? I feel like I got a raw deal here.
    You didn't. English is an awesome language.

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    cB557cB557 voOOP Registered User regular
    Hawk one wrote: »
    Showsni wrote: »
    The real question is where afternoon ends and evening begins. Does afternoon ever end? I'd agree with Tycho, though; afternoon is very clearly after noon, and never before it, on a particular day.
    You've got morning, which describes the time of day before noon, from sunrise to noon.

    I'd say morning can sometimes refer to any time between midnight and noon. The early hours of the morning. It was two in the morning. That kind of thing. So, day is sunrise to sunset; night is sunset to sunrise; morning is midnight to noon; and afternoon is noon to midnight?

    Personally, I think "morning" is used stupidly in the English language. I mean, why is it supposed to describe the entire period between midnight and noon, considering how the beginning and end of this period is as different as... Well, as day and night? -And- overlapping with the word "night" at that? Silly, just plain silly.
    I don't think anyone actually uses morning in that way unless they're doing the Singing in the Rain joke. Pretty sure morning usually just means from sunrise until noon.

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    UncleSporkyUncleSporky Registered User regular
    I dunno the best place to post this but either the page or my browser decided to do this

    2vPJjSN.png

    Switch Friend Code: SW - 5443 - 2358 - 9118 || 3DS Friend Code: 0989 - 1731 - 9504 || NNID: unclesporky
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