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how do I clean my metal stovetop?

AvrahamAvraham Registered User regular
Hi folks. I promise I'm a very clean person. It was like this when I moved in. Unfortunately I'm the only roommate who uses the kitchen or cares about cleaning.

I dont know what to do with this... using a washcloth just seems to dirty the washcloth more than it cleans the metal. I assume it's iron but I dont know what the material is
IKkaywU.jpg

Also you cant quite see in this photo but the inside of the bathroom sink looks like the black lagoon... this is after I tried cleaning the stopper.
lJKR6Cc.jpg

tumblr_mw0i6gT4l61qgwizbo1_250.png :bz: :bz: :bzz:

Posts

  • Captain MarcusCaptain Marcus now arrives the hour of actionRegistered User regular
    sink= bleach

    bleach is cheap, bleach is useful, dump some bleach in there. Soak the stopper in bleach for a bit.

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  • CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    edited March 18
    On the metal stove grate: You can run those through the dishwasher, that's why they're removable. But if you feel the layers are too caked on for a dishwasher to clean them, this stuff has worked pretty well for me: https://www.amazon.com/KEEPERS-Scouring-Dishcloth-Multipurpose-Stovetop/dp/B01FNDG2I2/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1489861706&sr=8-10&keywords=stove+cleaner&th=1

    Really any manner of stove-specific cleaner will probably do the job.

    (keep in mind this cleanser is for metal surfaces only and don't use it on your porcelain sink, it will scratch them)

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  • VishNubVishNub Registered User regular
    For the stove top, since it looks like it's not enameled, you can probably just steel wool it into oblivion.

    Or, go to home depot or a restaurant supply store and find the most noxious stove cleaner they have. Then do it outside.

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  • schussschuss Registered User regular
    Cambiata wrote: »
    On the metal stove grate: You can run those through the dishwasher, that's why they're removable. But if you feel the layers are too caked on for a dishwasher to clean them, this stuff has worked pretty well for me: https://www.amazon.com/KEEPERS-Scouring-Dishcloth-Multipurpose-Stovetop/dp/B01FNDG2I2/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1489861706&sr=8-10&keywords=stove+cleaner&th=1

    Really any manner of stove-specific cleaner will probably do the job.

    (keep in mind this cleanser is for metal surfaces only and don't use it on your porcelain sink, it will scratch them)

    Not always.
    Also - on using bleach - just make sure you're not on septic, as too much can do bad things.

  • HandgimpHandgimp STEVE BANNON IS ON THE NSC JESUS FUCKING CHRIST WTFRegistered User regular
    VishNub raises a good point - make sure you have adequate ventilation when working with chemicals. Even bleach.

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  • DhalphirDhalphir don't you open that trapdoor you're a fool if you dareRegistered User regular
    edited March 19
    This is cast iron. The easiest way to clean it is if you have a laundry sink or something big enough to fully submerge it in water. If you do, get concentrated detergent and go to town on it with steel wool while immersed in the water.

    If you don't have a sink that big, then wiping it down with a cloth soaking in hot soapy water and then going to town with steel wool is a decent backup.

    Third option, get some high strength oven cleaner, put it outside on the ground and spray the oven foam onto it. Leave it to sit and then use the above method to finish it off.

    Dhalphir on
  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    If it's cast iron, you can also burn it off using a high heat source, like a grill. You can also use the self cleaning cycle of the oven, as long as you accept the risks when using that feature. Everything that's not the grill will turn to ash and clean off with regular detergent scrubs. That's if degreaser treatments aren't getting you anywhere though

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  • JavenJaven Registered User regular
    Paladin wrote: »
    If it's cast iron, you can also burn it off using a high heat source, like a grill. You can also use the self cleaning cycle of the oven, as long as you accept the risks when using that feature. Everything that's not the grill will turn to ash and clean off with regular detergent scrubs. That's if degreaser treatments aren't getting you anywhere though

    I was just coming in to suggest this. Basically treat it like you're curing a new skillet, but skip the oil part. Wash in warm/hot soapy water and use steel wool to scour, then paper towel dry as much as you can, and stick it in the oven on a self-cleaning cycle

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  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    1. Step one. Use a steel wire brush (preferably with some water) and clean off most of the gunk.
    2. Finish off with steel wool and water.
    3. Oil it up with a neutral cooking oil. Preferably this oil should be heated to 150 °C (in the oven) to really work it in and then gently drying off excess oil with paper towels.

  • m!ttensm!ttens Registered User regular
    Barkeepers Friend is a good scouring powder (it is oxalic acid powder) though your grates look too far gone for it right now. I second the idea of running them on the self-clean cycle in the oven and scrubbing all the burnt carbon deposits off after it's finished. I use flaxseed oil for seasoning my cast iron as it provides a hard slick barrier as it cures onto the metal.

  • PaladinPaladin Registered User regular
    I would suggest barkeeper's friend for all finished surfaces, but not porous metal like cast iron - unless you finished it off in a baking soda bath.

    Marty: The future, it's where you're going?
    Doc: That's right, twenty five years into the future. I've always dreamed on seeing the future, looking beyond my years, seeing the progress of mankind. I'll also be able to see who wins the next twenty-five world series.
    NightDragon
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