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Question about Child Citizenship Act of 2000

KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
This is a bit of a strange situation, and I'll preface it by saying that a lot of it is on me due to just not taking care of this years ago.

I was born in 1983 in Mexico, my mom being an American Citizen (though one that was only born here, not living here) and my dad Mexican citizen, who eventually became American Citizen.

We eventually moved here to the U.S, where I became a permanent resident, and that has been my status till now. I also had a resident card that had no expiration date and has been considered valid still, even if my picture is of me as a kid (And yes, I know I should have gotten that renewed years ago).

We now my DL expired, and my local DMV won't let me renew as they don't consider my Permanent Resident Card Valid. So I finally renewed it back in May, but it looks like it'll be months before i'll get my replacement. So I started looking at citizen options and came across the Child Citizenship Act of 2000; which I think I fall under.

I was under 18 before 2/2001 (by just a few months), lived with my parents and in the U.S (been living here since 2nd grade). Is it that easy? I'm just now a citizen?

If so, how does it affect it that I been acting as a Permanent Resident all this time, without realizing that I was possibly a citizen?

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    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    You should speak to an immigration lawyer. I think you're right though, I think you'd classify as a citizen under that act, but you'd likely need a lawyer to get everything situated. You'd essentially become a US citizen as soon as they give you that certificate if I'm reading this right (your past status doesn't matter it?).

    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
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    ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    Consult an immigration lawyer. Do not wait. Do it now.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
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    DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    You should absolutely hire an immigration lawyer to help with getting citizenship.

    Permanent resident cards with no expiration dates haven't been issued in a couple decades, and in 2007 USCIS proposed new rules requiring all residents with a non-expiring permanent resident card 120 days to apply for a new, term limited card (10 years). Since then, they haven't declared the cards invalid, but they have made every attempt to suggest they intend to do so and really dislike the non-expiring cards. The status of the non-expiring cards is debatable at this time, and you may get mixed results attempting to reenter the country with it. At this time, you may not considered to be carrying valid ID depending on the mood of the immigration control agent. USCIS is strongly advocating that these cards be pulled and denied going forward.

    You are probably fine but this is absolutely not something you want to delay.

    What is this I don't even.
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    Gilbert0Gilbert0 North of SeattleRegistered User regular
    Even if you are correct and are a citizen, the DMZ doesn't take that as proof. You can't argue law with a clerk there. They want proof. A card, a certificate, something they can reference.

    Lawyer. ASAP.

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    KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    Darkewolfe wrote: »
    You should absolutely hire an immigration lawyer to help with getting citizenship.

    Permanent resident cards with no expiration dates haven't been issued in a couple decades, and in 2007 USCIS proposed new rules requiring all residents with a non-expiring permanent resident card 120 days to apply for a new, term limited card (10 years). Since then, they haven't declared the cards invalid, but they have made every attempt to suggest they intend to do so and really dislike the non-expiring cards. The status of the non-expiring cards is debatable at this time, and you may get mixed results attempting to reenter the country with it. At this time, you may not considered to be carrying valid ID depending on the mood of the immigration control agent. USCIS is strongly advocating that these cards be pulled and denied going forward.

    You are probably fine but this is absolutely not something you want to delay.

    Oh yeah, I already renewed my permanent resident card for all the reasons listed above, just waiting for it to be processed.

    But yeah, during my research I came across the Child Citizenship Act of 2000 thing act which made me question my whole status.

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    Fuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudFuzzy Cumulonimbus Cloud Registered User regular
    Only an immigration lawyer can truly help you.

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