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Bee Arthur: The Next Generation

ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morningAnd the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
I spent some time trying to find the old thread and got bored so I'm making a new one. The issues are pretty different by this point anyway, so I figure it's time for a spin-off.

Background: I have a parthenocissus plant I love; it's a crazy fast climber you can practically watch grow. Last year I made a bee friend I initially thought was killing my plant by taking chunks out of the leaves, but then I learned that it was a native honeybee that burrows and lays eggs rather than living communally, a fantastic pollinator and fairly docile. It turned out my plant was fine, and if I let her do her thing she would let me do mine. Then another one came along that was kind of a jerk, but eventually it left and she stuck around until it got too hot for bees. The plant made a full recovery and all was well the end.

The parthenocissus managed to survive the winter, and I've been over the moon about that. I've been anxiously awaiting the return of Bee Arthur's progeny, and I've started looking for signs of the crescent-shaped cutouts that would indicate they've returned and found my plant. I thought I maybe saw one, and was like YESSSS... except it was never just one. She'd come by, spend hours wreaking havoc on the leaves, and then return the next day. Also the leaves look kind of funny... not like last year, but then the plant is a year old now and maybe the leaves just start to look like that. I dunno, I just started thinking about this stuff last year.

After some poking around online, I think what happened is when my husband and son brought me home this beautiful miniature rose plant, it may have had some downy mildew. I cut off everywhere I found it and it seemed okay.. it hasn't had another bud, but I dunno.. anyway, now my parthenocissis looks like it does and I'd really like to save it, both for the plant and my bee friends.

I looked up fungicides that won't hurt bees, and nothing seems to be 100% certain on that second part. I looked up treatments for downy mildew specifically and so far all I've come up with is "PULL IT UP DESTROY IT WITH FIRE ALONG WITH EVERYTHING AROUND IT AND BURN DOWN YOUR HOUSE AND SURROUNDING PROPERTIES JUST TO BE SURE, IT'S THE ONLY WAY."

I'm not even sure that's what's going on, and I definitely don't want to kill my plant. :( But I also don't know how bad something like that could be for bees who tried to eat it, and that's really more important to me than a plant I can replace.

Should I murder my plant in cold blood to save any future Bee Arthurs? Or is it safe to let it go and see what happens?

And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
Shadowfire

Posts

  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    On closer inspection, it may not be so dire. It may be a nutrient deficiency, which makes sense because it is in a pot. It probably could use a bigger pot, but I don't even know where I'd start with that.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
  • JaysonFourJaysonFour Classy Monster Kitteh Registered User regular
    Have you tried giving it some plant food, like Miracle Gro? They have some plant food sticks that you can just stick into the pot and forget about, so that might be a place to start on that.

    If it is downy mildew, and the plant's not completely infested with it, apparently if you cut off and burn the infected parts to keep it from spreading and re-infesting, you should be good!

    It might also be that you're watering it too much, and that there's not enough in the way of airflow around the plant to dry it out (mildew loves dark, dank places that are wet and don't get good ventilation), so maybe try to be a bit more careful how you water it and try not to overwater the plant, if you can?

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  • ArbitraryDescriptorArbitraryDescriptor Registered User regular
    Cut off and burn the stumps? (To get spores or growth that may not have presented)
    Or
    Cut off and [completely dispose of] infected parts? (As opposed to leaving the trimmings around)

  • ceresceres When the last moon is cast over the last star of morning And the future has past without even a last desperate warningRegistered User, Moderator mod
    I've been trimming leaves on the climber and it seems to be helping, in that the spots don't seem to be coming back. I know another possibility is that the plant is getting too big for its pot and I just have no idea how to fix that. I do want to move it to a bigger pot anyway but the one it's in is pretty big to begin with.

    With the miniature rose I've been cutting off anything that looks suspicious, and there's a good bit of new growth so I feel like there's more room to do that as I see it. I should probably move it a bit farther from the climber.This shit is all really heavy though.

    And it seems like all is dying, and would leave the world to mourn
    IrukaJaysonFour
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