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How to restore leather boots

AridholAridhol Daddliest CatchRegistered User regular
I have a pair of Viberg linesman boots that were given to me by my dad and I want to use them for general wear. They are comfortable, if a bit heavy, and I like the look/profile.

The problem is they are work boots and look like it. I'd like to restore some of the newness and fix up bad scuffs and cuts (if possible).

These boots are extremely good quality and would cost probably $1000+ Canadian today so I'm willing to spend a bit on care products for them.

Couple of pictures:

https://imgur.com/gSlAvR5

https://imgur.com/x4gE2KN

https://imgur.com/8JDo7QF



So, how I fix boots?

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    SimpsoniaSimpsonia Registered User regular
    There's plenty of guides out there, but they really boil down to a couple simple things. Scrub them down with a good saddle soap and a brush. This process pulls all the natural oils out of leather, so you need to replace with a good conditioner. Apply the leather conditioner (probably a few times or more for boots that out of shape). Then give a really good polish and shine. Not going to lie, this is going to take a ton of elbow-grease, like multiple hours of work.

    If there are significant cracks or cuts, those are going to be harder to repair (you should be able to google some tutorials). Try not to flex the leather and make the crack worse before conditioning the leather to soften it up.

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    AridholAridhol Daddliest Catch Registered User regular
    I'm fine with the elbow grease. I know I won't get em looking new but some of the color back and making the scuffs not stand out too much is my main focus.

    I will go and get some saddle soap. Are we talking a soft brush or a good scrubber?
    I think I have a soft shoe brush around.

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    XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    Never brought a pair that damaged back, but I've never tried either so

    this is the technique I use for polishing though

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WdHS-IgbHC0

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    AridholAridhol Daddliest Catch Registered User regular
    Thanks Xaquin, I don't intend to get a real shine on but I assume the same technique applys to getting the conditioner & any color worked in?

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    XaquinXaquin Right behind you!Registered User regular
    Aridhol wrote: »
    Thanks Xaquin, I don't intend to get a real shine on but I assume the same technique applys to getting the conditioner & any color worked in?

    I'd say so

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    FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    1. Brush off all particles with a dry brush.
    2. Saddle soap. Use a shoe dauber to work in saddle soap, stuff the shoes with newspaper or rags to maintain the proper shape and let them dry. Once dry the leather shoul feel creamy. If not, repeat again.
    3. Mink oil. While the shoes are stuffed (so that the leather surface is stiff), work mink oil into any cracked areas (use disposable gloves preferably) and let it sit overnight, then remove the excess with a rag.
    4. (Judging from the pictures you don't need to do this part) Leather filler. IF you still have any deeper cracks, get yourself a leather filler (which might also be known as a "leather boot repair kit"). Apply it according to instructions.
    5. Once the boots are relatively crack free and has a creamy (but not wet) surface. It's time to apply the shoe cream. Buff them up using a soft rag, then apply the cream with a shoe dauber and get a nice thin layer. Then buff it up with a soft rag and keep working it. Not a lot of pressure. I've found that I get the best results if I wrap the rag around my point and index finger and then use rapid circling motion.

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