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How does an executive master’s compare to a regular one?

QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
I’m wrapping up my bachelor’s degree at the end of spring. Talking to an advisor at American University it looks like I qualify for an executive master’s in international service.

My only question is how would this look compared to a regular master’s? The military TA will cover most if not all of the tuition and the greatly reduced course load is attractive since I’m not especially fond of school. I just want to make sure I’m not sabotaging myself when I start job hunting after I get out.

Posts

  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    edited December 2018
    Executive Masters programs mean different things in different states, but in my area they generally are accelerated programs for folks who don't actually need the credential but just want the skills involved (i.e. mid-level career folk who already have a high-skill job but want a credential to help bump them from mid-level to upper-level management).

    If you are expecting to use a masters for future spring-boarding, like to a doctorate or professional school, its probably not a great call. As far as how it will look to the job market, that's a gamble. Most folks don't know what an executive program is and it sounds cool, but if they do know its a rush program it won't do you any favors.

    I don't think they are particularly useful for entry-level applicants, nor are they designed as such. Being pushed towards one after graduation sounds like a really shitty advising, personally.

    Enc on
    ThroNSDFRand
  • lunchbox12682lunchbox12682 MinnesotaRegistered User regular
    Well the MBA type is usually way more expensive (it's usually paid by a company for executives or high potential employees), more structured (your classes and books and maybe even work groups are set), and shorter (due to the structure). There may also be previous work requirements, but that's definitely up to the school.

    Good luck.

  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Enc wrote: »
    Executive Masters programs mean different things in different states, but in my area they generally are accelerated programs for folks who don't actually need the credential but just want the skills involved (i.e. mid-level career folk who already have a high-skill job but want a credential to help bump them from mid-level to upper-level management).

    If you are expecting to use a masters for future spring-boarding, like to a doctorate or professional school, its probably not a great call. As far as how it will look to the job market, that's a gamble. Most folks don't know what an executive program is and it sounds cool, but if they do know its a rush program it won't do you any favors.

    I don't think they are particularly useful for entry-level applicants, nor are they designed as such. Being pushed towards one after graduation sounds like a really shitty advising, personally.

    I’m 32 and have over a decade in my field. While I’m just finishing my degree I’m hardly inexperienced and don’t really plan on applying for anything entry level when I get out of the Navy in five years.

    Definitely not looking to get a doctorate either. After this I’d hope to be mostly done with academia.

  • EncEnc A Fool with Compassion The Land of Flowers (and Dragons)Registered User regular
    I'd ask around in your desired work field to see what the perspective is for what you want to do. Usually you are directed to an executive degree (as in, your company wants to train you up and sends you to it on their dime), rather than jumping in. Make sure its worth the investment in the perspectives of those who would hire you.

  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    Quid wrote: »
    Enc wrote: »
    Executive Masters programs mean different things in different states, but in my area they generally are accelerated programs for folks who don't actually need the credential but just want the skills involved (i.e. mid-level career folk who already have a high-skill job but want a credential to help bump them from mid-level to upper-level management).

    If you are expecting to use a masters for future spring-boarding, like to a doctorate or professional school, its probably not a great call. As far as how it will look to the job market, that's a gamble. Most folks don't know what an executive program is and it sounds cool, but if they do know its a rush program it won't do you any favors.

    I don't think they are particularly useful for entry-level applicants, nor are they designed as such. Being pushed towards one after graduation sounds like a really shitty advising, personally.

    I’m 32 and have over a decade in my field. While I’m just finishing my degree I’m hardly inexperienced and don’t really plan on applying for anything entry level when I get out of the Navy in five years.

    Definitely not looking to get a doctorate either. After this I’d hope to be mostly done with academia.

    If you're planning to go into my field, just having the master's regardless of its origin is going to be sufficient to meet the HR/reg requirements.

    What is this I don't even.
    QuidRadiation
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Oh hey, duh. I know people that work here.

    Yeah mostly looking to make myself more competitive in our area when I get out. Possibly take a swipe at something outside the DoD.

    Radiation
  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    I wouldn't say it's a competitive advantage so much as a direct requirement for certain types of positions. Still, if you can do it while motivated, do it. I want to get a master's myself but it's hard to do now that I'm settled in.

    What is this I don't even.
  • QuidQuid I don't... what... hnnng Registered User regular
    Hey so long as the pay’s good. I’ve got a lot more flexibility and free time for a couple years so this is probably the best time.

    Radiation
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