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You're [History], Like A Beat Up Car

BogartBogart Streetwise Hercules Fighting The Rising OddsRegistered User, Moderator mod
This is a thread for posting cool things from history.

Such as the story of a French ship wrecked during the Napoleonic wars off the coast of Hartlepool with all hands lost. A monkey survived, apparently dressed in a French uniform, and was put on trial by the local townsfolk, either as sport or because they believed the monkey (never having seen one before) to be a Frenchman. The monkey was duly hanged and the tale passed into local legend, both as a source of amusement for people outside Hartlepool, who derisively called its inhabitants "monkey hangers", and for Hartlepool itself, which took the monkey on as a mascot for many local sports teams.

Anyone posting things that turn out not to be true will be given detention. When we reach page 100 there will be a test.

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Posts

  • RichyRichy Registered User regular
    "Some #10yearchallenge are better than others"

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  • knitdanknitdan Oh no Too much hornyRegistered User regular
    April 29, 1975

    The Vietnam War is going very poorly.

    Ba Van Nguyen, a Major in the South Vietnamese Air Force, realizes that the war is lost and the chain of command has completely broken down.

    He takes a Chinook helicopter (big dual-rotor helicopter) and lands it in front of his family’s home in Saigon, loading his entire family on board. He heads out to sea, hoping to escape heavy fighting in the city. He hears English radio chatter and realizes there may be a nearby US vessel that can aid the people aboard his Chinook.

    That ship is the USS Kirk, which has been taking in desperate refugees like Nguyen and his family all day. However, the Chinook is far too big to land on the deck.

    So Major Nguyen hovers above the deck and people start jumping. Once everyone but himself is safely aboard, he now has a problem. He can’t simply jump out without crashing the Chinook and killing everyone on the Kirk.

    So he flies off to starboard and hovers above the sea. He removes his flight suit while somehow still holding the Chinook steady. And then, he rolls it into the sea, jumping out so as not to be caught in the giant metal death trap

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
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  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    If you have an odd first name, look at the bright side - at least you don't have a Puritan first name:
    12 of the Cruelest Puritan Names (meant to remind children of the pain of the world)
    Humiliation. Humiliation Hynde had two sons in the 1620s; he called them both Humiliation Hynde.
    Fly-debate
    No-merit. NoMerit Vynall was born in Warbleton in Sussex, a fount of beautiful names.
    Helpless
    Reformation
    Abstinence
    More-triale
    Handmaid
    Obedience
    Forsaken
    Sorry-for-sin. Sorry-for-sin Coupard was another resident of Warbleton.
    Lament

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  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Constable Visit dodged a bullet

    torchlight-sig-80.jpg
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  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    edited January 30
    Reminds me of the Carolean army (the swedish army under Charles XI and Charles XII). The officers of a company had absolute power over their men, even to the point of deciding their patronym (since everyone only had a first name there could be hundreds of "Lars, son of Johan").
    Usually they were given a name that reflected their character or was meant to imspire. From this comes names like Ståhl (Steel), Svärdh (sword), Rask (quick), Fager (fair/beautiful). Also names from nature like Löv (leaf), Falk (Falcon), Ek (Oak) or Duva (Dove) was common.

    Some soldiers were less fortunate.
    The rolls tell us of a soldier who for the first two years of his service was known as "Försupen" (Drunkard), until at some point (at the insistence of the regimental priest) he was given the name Förbättrad (Improved).

    Fiendishrabbit on
    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
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  • BlackDragon480BlackDragon480 Bluster Kerfuffle Master of Windy ImportRegistered User regular
    Did someone say Carolus Rex?



    I got engaged in a nearly 40 minute series of counterfactuals with the gentleman singing this song starting from the question "What if Charles XII was healthy at Poltava and could've lead on the field, instead of on an overlook with crappy communications?"

    First they came for the Muslims and we said...NOT TODAY MOTHERFUCKERS!
    ElvenshaeKayne Red Robe
  • BlackDragon480BlackDragon480 Bluster Kerfuffle Master of Windy ImportRegistered User regular
    edited February 9
    Huh, what I remember from econ back in the day in undergrad was seemingly wrong. For the most part I recall being taught that the first public joint stock companies date to the 16th century low/Benelux countries, or maybe 15th century Pisa and Florence if you count certain colluding guilds.

    The oldest continuous operating publically traded company is actually a paper and forestry company now based in Finland but chartered in Sweden. I give you:

    Stora Enso

    This piece of wonder was originally established as a water driven copper mine complex along with water based lumber and paper mills (one of the first in Northern Europe and Scandinavia) during a 13th century surge in hooking waterwheels up to anything needing rotating motive power and Europeans were learning about cam shafts and gears again, along with rudimentary transmissions. It was chartered and shares put up for sale in 1288, making it 830 years young and still going strong.

    Yes the ownership has shifted nations, but there are still active values descended from those first 1288 shares on the books.

    Seems paper mills were the in thing to make in the 13rh and 14th centuries. A now defunct one was done in Cordoba, Spain in the 1290's and Moulin Richard de Bas in France still runs and churns out high grade paper and vellum for artists and draftsmen.

    BlackDragon480 on
    First they came for the Muslims and we said...NOT TODAY MOTHERFUCKERS!
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  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited February 13
    This is the last picture of the USS Hornet, taken October 26th, 1942, just before it finally sank after being struck by three enemy bombs, three enemy torpedoes, and three kamikaze attacks.

    Also nine American torpedoes and more than 400 5 inch shells in an attempt to scuttle the ship, and then two more enemy torpedoes.

    Listing_USS_Hornet_%28CV-8%29_is_abandoned_in_the_late_afternoon_of_26_October_1942.jpg

    This is a picture of an International Harvester plane tug on the USS Hornet, taken January 23rd, 2019, 17,000 feet below the surface of the Pacific ocean, having been found 76 years after it sank.

    k7caRg9.jpg

    https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2019/02/12/sunken-aircraft-carrier-hornet-best-known-for-doolittle-raid-located-miles-below-the-waves/

    matt has a problem on
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  • knitdanknitdan Oh no Too much hornyRegistered User regular
    Those old Internationals were built to last

    “I was quick when I came in here, I’m twice as quick now”
    -Indiana Solo, runner of blades
    MayabirddoomybearMetzger MeisterDuke 2.0SkeithL Ron HowardJoolanderfurlion
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    The Great War has released their first video after their reorganization, dealing with the ramifications of the war's end in January 1919:

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    FencingsaxBlackDragon480ToxLoisLane
  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    knitdan wrote: »
    Those old Internationals were built to last

    if they don't use this whole thing in advertising they're fools.

    full page spread in... american farmer magazine. which is probably a thing.

    Doodmann
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Amazon: shorturl.at/giJSV Steam: shorturl.at/ftCLSRegistered User regular
    No, they should go and retrieve it, and get it running again. Don't restore it, just get it operational and reliable.
    Tour it all around IH agricultural equipment dealerships around the world.

    BloodySlothL Ron HowardDiplominatorfurlionlonelyahavaForarMoridin889
  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    god... even with how tough those old farm tractors are i cannot imagine the amount of work you'd need to do to get it running.

    although, it doesn't look all that bad, all things considered.

    Elvenshae
  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    god... even with how tough those old farm tractors are i cannot imagine the amount of work you'd need to do to get it running.

    although, it doesn't look all that bad, all things considered.

    Any coral growth would probably be the worst part, and I'm thinking you could strip that somehow without damaging the tractor (scrubbing with a lightly acidic solution maybe, and then washing it off right away? That would dissolve the calcium carbonate of the coral growth eventually). Those tires look like they're in amazingly good shape, so the cold temps may have allowed the seals to keep from rotting; wouldn't keep the water out at those depths, but the seals might have managed to keep anything from growing in the engine.

    Honestly, I'd bet you'd need a hell of a less work to get that tractor running than, say, something that has been left sitting out in a yard for the same amount of time, rusting away.

    BlackDragon480DouglasDangerfurlionHappylilElfMoridin889
  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    god... even with how tough those old farm tractors are i cannot imagine the amount of work you'd need to do to get it running.

    although, it doesn't look all that bad, all things considered.

    Any coral growth would probably be the worst part, and I'm thinking you could strip that somehow without damaging the tractor (scrubbing with a lightly acidic solution maybe, and then washing it off right away? That would dissolve the calcium carbonate of the coral growth eventually). Those tires look like they're in amazingly good shape, so the cold temps may have allowed the seals to keep from rotting; wouldn't keep the water out at those depths, but the seals might have managed to keep anything from growing in the engine.

    Honestly, I'd bet you'd need a hell of a less work to get that tractor running than, say, something that has been left sitting out in a yard for the same amount of time, rusting away.

    The salt water is a vastly worse environment than just sitting in some yard. Everything on it has open vent holes that will allow water in. The internals are going to be rusted into a solid lump. If it had sat in your yard for 50 years, if rain hadn't gotten inside, it's possible a new battery and new gas could have it running again.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
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  • FencingsaxFencingsax It is difficult to get a man to understand, when his salary depends upon his not understanding GNU Terry PratchettRegistered User regular
    Salt water is extremely corrosive.

    torchlight-sig-80.jpg
    ElvenshaeKanaOrca
  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    Salt spray is extremely corrosive, since there's an abundance of oxygen for producing iron oxides. In near-freezing temperatures in deep water with very very low oxygen concentration, the corrosion process would be tremendously slowed (particularly if a rust-inhibiting layer forms on the subject or already existed, and it would be likely the tractor was treated with a protective marine paint).

    We can still clearly read the logo off that tractor, and the steel cables securing it to the deck are intact despite 70 years of being kept under tension. There's sure to be some corrosion, but no way is it going to be like something left on a shoreline or in shallow water.

    AridholBlackDragon480chrishallett83matt has a problemElvenshaevalhalla130L Ron HowardfurlionMoridin889
  • Metzger MeisterMetzger Meister Registered User regular
    Cold water is basically the archaeological equivalent of the pause button. Also, peat bogs.

    BlackDragon480chrishallett83Aridholmatt has a problemvalhalla130ZibblsnrtDuke 2.0L Ron HowardfurlionjmcdonaldForarMoridin889
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Amazon: shorturl.at/giJSV Steam: shorturl.at/ftCLSRegistered User regular
    god... even with how tough those old farm tractors are i cannot imagine the amount of work you'd need to do to get it running.

    although, it doesn't look all that bad, all things considered.

    I'm a diesel technician by trade. Gimme that tractor, my tools, and enough money for gaskets and seals, and I'll get it running again. There's folks out there in the steam enthusiast community resurrecting engines that have been buried for over a century and which have corroded into a solid lump, that tractor looks damn near as good as new from my perspective.

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  • TraceTrace GNU Terry Pratchett; GNU Gus; GNU Carrie Fisher; GNU Adam We Registered User regular
    I'm gonna be honest. When I worked on the golf course the tractor I used looked in worse condition than that.

    ElvenshaeKayne Red Robevalhalla130RchanenAl_watL Ron HowardfurlionMoridin889
  • ZibblsnrtZibblsnrt Registered User regular
    Cold water is basically the archaeological equivalent of the pause button. Also, peat bogs.

    It depends on the composition of the ship - Titanic's wreck is going to collapse in the next few decades, for example - but yeah, it can be pretty stunning the kinds of things people can get off the seabed pretty much intact.

    Elvenshae
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Cold water is basically the archaeological equivalent of the pause button. Also, peat bogs.

    Unless its freezing it's not the temperature that puts things on hold, it's the lack of oxygen, so the oxygen content is extremely important when it comes to preserve wrecks. Vasa had an additional advantage in that the baltic isn't salty enough to support shipworms and that the water was heavily polluted at the time, and remained heavily polluted for the following 350 years (making it extremely rich in sulfur, which made the environment hostile to microorganisms. In fact, even now Vasa contains so much sulfur that it generates 100kg of sulfuric acid every year and has enough sulfur in it to generate 7 tons of sulfuric acid).
    If Vasa had sunk anywhere else in the world it would not have been as well preserved. But the low-salinity, sheltered, oxygen-poor and heavily polluted water in the Stockholm bay was ideal. In fact, if the ship hadn't been discovered and salvaged when it was it would probably have been gone in the next century. People had become gradually more and more concerned about the quality of the water surrounding Stockholm, and efforts were taken to reduce the pollution, to the point where the sulfur-rich environment that once protected Vasa doesn't exist anymore.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
    Shadowhope
  • ElvenshaeElvenshae Registered User regular
    Zibblsnrt wrote: »
    Cold water is basically the archaeological equivalent of the pause button. Also, peat bogs.

    It depends on the composition of the ship - Titanic's wreck is going to collapse in the next few decades, for example - but yeah, it can be pretty stunning the kinds of things people can get off the seabed pretty much intact.

    Like 133-year-old beer!

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  • ToxTox I kill threads Punch DimensionRegistered User regular
    The Great War has released their first video after their reorganization, dealing with the ramifications of the war's end in January 1919:

    So this has been a really neat youtube channel that I was wish was available as a podcast but ah well.

    Can anybody recommend a good WW1 based podcast? Or episodes of a podcast that focus on WW1? I recently slogged through Blueprint for Armageddon, by Dan Carlin, which was alright but very, very lengthy.

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  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited February 17
    There is one that goes through the war chronologically called The History Of The Great War.

    It’s detailed and there’s probably hundreds of episodes at this point. Can’t really speak to its factual-ness since I’m not well read enough. It does feel very home made, I don’t know if that changes later on since I haven’t really gotten far enough to tell yet.

    Edit: Actually, if you want a tighter summary type of thing this is probably the opposite of what you asked for. :p

    Honk on
    PSN: Honkalot
  • ToxTox I kill threads Punch DimensionRegistered User regular
    I'm not worried about tightness/looseness, and I don't know mind something that's got a lot of content, what killed me about Blueprint for Armageddon was that each episode was multiple hours. I don't mind hundreds of hours of content, but ideally episodes would be 20-60 minutes each, at least mostly.

    I did try giving History of the Great War a listen, but the first episode felt very ... I'm not sure how to explain it. It felt like the person was definitely reading a script, but also that they weren't very practiced at reading a script. Kind of like how some folks can make prompter speeches and make them feel natural, while others can't hide that they're reading? It felt very much like the latter, and I couldn't get through the first episode for it.

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  • HonkHonk Honk is this poster. Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    Tox wrote: »
    I'm not worried about tightness/looseness, and I don't know mind something that's got a lot of content, what killed me about Blueprint for Armageddon was that each episode was multiple hours. I don't mind hundreds of hours of content, but ideally episodes would be 20-60 minutes each, at least mostly.

    I did try giving History of the Great War a listen, but the first episode felt very ... I'm not sure how to explain it. It felt like the person was definitely reading a script, but also that they weren't very practiced at reading a script. Kind of like how some folks can make prompter speeches and make them feel natural, while others can't hide that they're reading? It felt very much like the latter, and I couldn't get through the first episode for it.

    Yup, I know exactly what you mean. Style is usually pretty important to me but I stuck with it for a while remembering Mike Duncan’s early stuff felt pretty shaky as well. But then other stuff caught my ears so I fell off it before I could tell if it was improving.

    PSN: Honkalot
  • SolarSolar Registered User regular

    The Black Sea is kind of crazy because below a certain point it's anoxic so there's just like, no decomposition at all. The wreck they found was almost perfectly preserved. And it used to be an extremely heavily trafficked area of ancient shipping, who knows how many wrecks are down there!

  • Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    Speaking of the sea:

    Measuring longitude was a bugger of a problem for centuries, and in 1714 the British government offered a prize to anyone who could work out a way of accurately calculating it. One method was proposed by Humphry Ditton and William Whiston.

    The authors' Wikipedia pages just mention the fact that their proposal was rejected, but (in part thanks to the web comic SMBC, I bothered to read the original.

    Their proposal is online here: A new method for discovering the longitude both at sea and land: humbly proposed to the consideration of the publick.

    There's a lot of talk of geometry and speed of sound and weather conditions, but the proposal boils down to "let's install a load of massive fuck-off guns along sea routes and fire them every midnight".

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  • MayabirdMayabird Pecking at the keyboardRegistered User regular
    I have seen a modern proposal for something similar. In the event of some kind of catastrophic event requiring civilization to be rebuilt, people could build giant radio stations that would send off a pulse at local noon so nearby ships could detect the pulse, determine how far off they are from local noon, and thus determine their longitude. They wouldn't need all that great of a radio receiver either, so it would be good for early years of rebuilding.

  • Ninja Snarl PNinja Snarl P My helmet is my burden. Ninja Snarl: Gone, but not forgotten.Registered User regular
    Mayabird wrote: »
    I have seen a modern proposal for something similar. In the event of some kind of catastrophic event requiring civilization to be rebuilt, people could build giant radio stations that would send off a pulse at local noon so nearby ships could detect the pulse, determine how far off they are from local noon, and thus determine their longitude. They wouldn't need all that great of a radio receiver either, so it would be good for early years of rebuilding.

    That seems like considerable overkill, since longitude determination can be done anywhere with a sextant and a good clock, and quartz clocks are portable, long-lasting, easy to make, and reliable (even the cheap ones only lose a handful of seconds a month).

    DouglasDangerchrishallett83ElvenshaeMoridin889
  • PhyphorPhyphor Building Planet Busters Tasting FruitRegistered User regular
    Mayabird wrote: »
    I have seen a modern proposal for something similar. In the event of some kind of catastrophic event requiring civilization to be rebuilt, people could build giant radio stations that would send off a pulse at local noon so nearby ships could detect the pulse, determine how far off they are from local noon, and thus determine their longitude. They wouldn't need all that great of a radio receiver either, so it would be good for early years of rebuilding.

    That seems like considerable overkill, since longitude determination can be done anywhere with a sextant and a good clock, and quartz clocks are portable, long-lasting, easy to make, and reliable (even the cheap ones only lose a handful of seconds a month).

    15 seconds a month is enough to miss your position considerably, by 15-20km. And that's assuming a modern implementation with frequency tuning and relative temperature stability

    The highest precision quartz clocks would be more than enough, but require specialized manufacturing and a much larger power supply to keep the crystal at a precise temperature

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  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Phyphor wrote: »
    Mayabird wrote: »
    I have seen a modern proposal for something similar. In the event of some kind of catastrophic event requiring civilization to be rebuilt, people could build giant radio stations that would send off a pulse at local noon so nearby ships could detect the pulse, determine how far off they are from local noon, and thus determine their longitude. They wouldn't need all that great of a radio receiver either, so it would be good for early years of rebuilding.

    That seems like considerable overkill, since longitude determination can be done anywhere with a sextant and a good clock, and quartz clocks are portable, long-lasting, easy to make, and reliable (even the cheap ones only lose a handful of seconds a month).

    15 seconds a month is enough to miss your position considerably, by 15-20km. And that's assuming a modern implementation with frequency tuning and relative temperature stability

    The highest precision quartz clocks would be more than enough, but require specialized manufacturing and a much larger power supply to keep the crystal at a precise temperature

    Which is why before GPS sailors adopted latitude sailing, ie that before your longitude error margin you reach the correct latitude and then sail east/west until you reach your target.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
  • chrishallett83chrishallett83 Amazon: shorturl.at/giJSV Steam: shorturl.at/ftCLSRegistered User regular
    Phyphor wrote: »
    Mayabird wrote: »
    I have seen a modern proposal for something similar. In the event of some kind of catastrophic event requiring civilization to be rebuilt, people could build giant radio stations that would send off a pulse at local noon so nearby ships could detect the pulse, determine how far off they are from local noon, and thus determine their longitude. They wouldn't need all that great of a radio receiver either, so it would be good for early years of rebuilding.

    That seems like considerable overkill, since longitude determination can be done anywhere with a sextant and a good clock, and quartz clocks are portable, long-lasting, easy to make, and reliable (even the cheap ones only lose a handful of seconds a month).

    15 seconds a month is enough to miss your position considerably, by 15-20km. And that's assuming a modern implementation with frequency tuning and relative temperature stability

    The highest precision quartz clocks would be more than enough, but require specialized manufacturing and a much larger power supply to keep the crystal at a precise temperature

    Yeah but even a (relatively) cheap Bulova Precisionist wristwatch keeps time to five seconds a month. If you spend more you can get a quartz wristwatch that keeps time better than 10 seconds per YEAR (a Longines VHP starts at about a thousand bucks brand new). That's the whole thing with quartz watches, they're way more accurate than clockwork watches.

    Elvenshae
  • Jealous DevaJealous Deva Registered User regular
    edited March 3
    Mayabird wrote: »
    I have seen a modern proposal for something similar. In the event of some kind of catastrophic event requiring civilization to be rebuilt, people could build giant radio stations that would send off a pulse at local noon so nearby ships could detect the pulse, determine how far off they are from local noon, and thus determine their longitude. They wouldn't need all that great of a radio receiver either, so it would be good for early years of rebuilding.

    That seems like considerable overkill, since longitude determination can be done anywhere with a sextant and a good clock, and quartz clocks are portable, long-lasting, easy to make, and reliable (even the cheap ones only lose a handful of seconds a month).

    There are probably better reasons than just lattitude to do a radio pulse system though, if you had 2 or 3 such positions nearby and an accurate map you could figure out your position fairly reliably without even worrying about external methods of calculating longitude and lattitude.

    And it really isn’t a huge technical challenge to build an AM transmitter that can be heard for hundreds of miles. A proto-post apocalyptic civilization could set up a primative land and coastal based gps system fairly easily.

    Jealous Deva on
  • PhyphorPhyphor Building Planet Busters Tasting FruitRegistered User regular
    Phyphor wrote: »
    Mayabird wrote: »
    I have seen a modern proposal for something similar. In the event of some kind of catastrophic event requiring civilization to be rebuilt, people could build giant radio stations that would send off a pulse at local noon so nearby ships could detect the pulse, determine how far off they are from local noon, and thus determine their longitude. They wouldn't need all that great of a radio receiver either, so it would be good for early years of rebuilding.

    That seems like considerable overkill, since longitude determination can be done anywhere with a sextant and a good clock, and quartz clocks are portable, long-lasting, easy to make, and reliable (even the cheap ones only lose a handful of seconds a month).

    15 seconds a month is enough to miss your position considerably, by 15-20km. And that's assuming a modern implementation with frequency tuning and relative temperature stability

    The highest precision quartz clocks would be more than enough, but require specialized manufacturing and a much larger power supply to keep the crystal at a precise temperature

    Yeah but even a (relatively) cheap Bulova Precisionist wristwatch keeps time to five seconds a month. If you spend more you can get a quartz wristwatch that keeps time better than 10 seconds per YEAR (a Longines VHP starts at about a thousand bucks brand new). That's the whole thing with quartz watches, they're way more accurate than clockwork watches.

    I know. But the quality of quartz watch you'd get in a rebuild civilization scenario is going to be much closer to a common watch than the precision versions

    Magic Box
    Academician Prokhor "Phyphor" Zakharov, Chief Scientist of China, Provost of the University of Planet - SE++ Megagame
  • FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    And it really isn’t a huge technical challenge to build an AM transmitter that can be heard for hundreds of miles. A proto-post apocalyptic civilization could set up a primative land and coastal based gps system fairly easily.

    It's kind of...not that easy. The level of technology needed is quite basic, but the industrial challenge is high. Basicly LF transmitters that use ground propagation are very dependent on size. Bigger is absolutely better.
    For example the transatlantic transmitters were usually multi-tower cables that were over 2km long, while submarines (since LF waves can penetrate up to 200m of water) usually had cables stretching from bow to stern during WWI and today usually have the ability to deploy a trailing cable that's several hundred meters long.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
  • KaputaKaputa Registered User regular
    Honk wrote: »
    Tox wrote: »
    I'm not worried about tightness/looseness, and I don't know mind something that's got a lot of content, what killed me about Blueprint for Armageddon was that each episode was multiple hours. I don't mind hundreds of hours of content, but ideally episodes would be 20-60 minutes each, at least mostly.

    I did try giving History of the Great War a listen, but the first episode felt very ... I'm not sure how to explain it. It felt like the person was definitely reading a script, but also that they weren't very practiced at reading a script. Kind of like how some folks can make prompter speeches and make them feel natural, while others can't hide that they're reading? It felt very much like the latter, and I couldn't get through the first episode for it.

    Yup, I know exactly what you mean. Style is usually pretty important to me but I stuck with it for a while remembering Mike Duncan’s early stuff felt pretty shaky as well. But then other stuff caught my ears so I fell off it before I could tell if it was improving.
    I love Mike Duncan. His recent (ongoing?) series on the Mexican Revolution is great. Last winter while plowing I listened to his whole French Revolution series and my mind was blown.

  • shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    Kaputa wrote: »
    Honk wrote: »
    Tox wrote: »
    I'm not worried about tightness/looseness, and I don't know mind something that's got a lot of content, what killed me about Blueprint for Armageddon was that each episode was multiple hours. I don't mind hundreds of hours of content, but ideally episodes would be 20-60 minutes each, at least mostly.

    I did try giving History of the Great War a listen, but the first episode felt very ... I'm not sure how to explain it. It felt like the person was definitely reading a script, but also that they weren't very practiced at reading a script. Kind of like how some folks can make prompter speeches and make them feel natural, while others can't hide that they're reading? It felt very much like the latter, and I couldn't get through the first episode for it.

    Yup, I know exactly what you mean. Style is usually pretty important to me but I stuck with it for a while remembering Mike Duncan’s early stuff felt pretty shaky as well. But then other stuff caught my ears so I fell off it before I could tell if it was improving.
    I love Mike Duncan. His recent (ongoing?) series on the Mexican Revolution is great. Last winter while plowing I listened to his whole French Revolution series and my mind was blown.

    The craziest thing about the French Revolution podcast is when you realise the damn thing took over a year. Like, there is just so goddamn much going on and he's still skipping a bunch of stuff.

    KaputaRchanenSkeithFencingsaxShadowhope
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