Club PA 2.0 has arrived! If you'd like to access some extra PA content and help support the forums, check it out at patreon.com/ClubPA
The image size limit has been raised to 1mb! Anything larger than that should be linked to. This is a HARD limit, please do not abuse it.
Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

Gettin' a puppy. Need some advice.

Descendant XDescendant X Hank FacepunchRegistered User regular
edited February 26 in Help / Advice Forum
So the Facepunch household is getting a new member on March 8th. We're getting a Lab/Retriever cross puppy who will be two months old when he's brought to us. Neither myself nor Mrs. Facepunch have any experience in owning a dog, much less a new puppy, and while I'm cool as a cucumber about the prospect Mrs. Facepunch is starting to freak out a bit. What advice have you, H&A?

Something used to be here. It's gone now.
Descendant X on
«1

Posts

  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    be consistent

    get used to pee on the floor for a little bit.

    things will get chewed on.

    remember it is basically a baby and knows nothing.

    camo_sig.png
    XaquinDarkewolfeDonnictondispatch.oElvenshaeKoopahTroopahbowenkimeMichaelLCHefflingZilla360chrishallett83SkeithApogee
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    So uh, this is basically gonna be a stream of consciousness bullet point list based on the training methods my father and I teach by; feel free to PM if you run into any particular troubles later

    Sign up for a puppy class once you have confirmed you have all the vaccinations up to date and papers for the dog as well

    A good puppy class will involve your puppy being introduced to and held/pet/played with by other people, practicing calming and examination exercises, *maybe* a slight bit of obedience, but most dogs aren't ready for real training until they hit 3 months; also have friends and family come over to play with the dog, and try to bring them other places where strangers are once they're vaccinated (parks, patios, malls, etc) to get exposure to people

    Get hooked up with a well-reviewed local vet ASAP and get a basic check-up within a few days of adoption to make sure everything looks good and your vaccinations are up to date/scheduled, as well as to get you on file

    Prior to full vaccinations, don't take your dog to a dog park or let them smell fecal matter on the street, they can get infections. Consider avoiding dog parks at least until they hit full growth, but even then be cautious about going to them at all - you might know your dog well, but you'd be surprised how many people bring dominant/"reactive" (ugh) dogs to a park and let them off-lead, only to bite another dog's face off

    Play with your dog's paws and mouth/teeth regularly so your vet will thank you later. One of our student's vets even recommended putting your hand in their mouth once a day so they don't see your hand as a threat should you ever hit them by accident (e.g. while falling) or if your dog ever needs dental work.

    Start off with 3 meals a day for the first two weeks you have them, then wean them off to two once they're older, so they'll wake you up/eliminate in the house less at night

    Then sign up for obedience sooner than later, because when they hit the teenage years of anywhere between 6 and 18 months depending on breed, their behaviour is gonna change as they try to use dominant behaviour to re-establish their position in the pack and it's better to have the building blocks of obedience sooner than later. Prioritize a school which uses reward over punishment and eliminates food over time. Find out if they work with the aim of doing off-lead work and if they use appropriate hand signals that your dog can see from across the field (This can be vital! My parents' old school they trained at had a dog pass away because they ran into traffic across a field and the owner hadn't gotten very far into off-lead work. You want to be able to control them from a distance to avoid something similar happening.) Again, you can feel free to PM if you're not sure about the methods a school appears to have

    To prevent anxiety, don't pay any attention to your dog for the first five minutes you enter your home or the five minutes before you leave; this'll prevent the mad barking rush/jumping you see in some dogs when their owners get home

    To crate train your dog, don't just lock them away. Start off with their food bowl in front of the crate, then edge it farther and farther into the crate every day. Once they eat at the back of the crate they're at the point where they'll consider it a "den". That's when it's finally okay to crate them for any length of time. Never punish them once they enter it, even if they bolt in while in trouble - it becomes their little sanctuary! If it's a wire crate, put blankets over the top. Also, make sure it isn't much bigger than your dog, to ensure they don't relieve themself inside it

    Also, dogs either chew out of anxiety or boredom, so if you're finding stuff is torn up at home, you need to address one or both. A morning walk, evening walk, playtime and obedience training (which they love but also get really tired out by) will be really helpful!

    And last but not least, if there's one exercise you're ever going to practice, make it the Long Down. Once they've hit three months, start putting your dog into a down for 30 minutes a night. Sit beside them while you read/game/watch TV/etc. They can fall asleep or lie on their side, but they can't get up or roll or crawl away. If they do, bring them back to the same spot silently and put them into a down. This is training them instinctually that you're in charge. If there's a specific family member they seem to disobey more often than not, have them do this process, because usually that's an indication the dog thinks they're higher in the hierarchy than they are. The impact of this can be pretty stark if your dog is exhibiting dominance issues! We've had very dominant dogs turn around fairly quickly with this exercise alone. It can also be helpful if your dog is jumpy with house guests, because you can put them in a down and then make them wait to see the guests until they're steady. As they get more reliable with the exercise, you can put them into a down from the couch, across the room, or even leave the room and come back to release them.

    And that's about it, really! If you want to learn more about minute puppy stuff, I'd recommend the book The Art of Raising A Puppy by the Monks of New Skete. I'm working through it right now in advance of getting my own pup and it's great!

    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
    Descendant XtynicDonnictondispatch.oFuzzy Cumulonimbus CloudWassermeloneElvenshaeKoopahTroopahbowenIrukakimeMichaelLCdjmitchellaZilla360chrishallett83StormwatcherTofystedethSkeithdesignfemmejkylefultonPlatyBurnageSpoit
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    Oh! Also! Don't freak out if your dog is a bit nippy. This is actually how puppies communicate and learn boundaries. If they try to nibble on you, yell OW! and then immediately stop playing with them. They're trying to sort out what is and is not okay as far as play goes. It isn't necessarily a sign of dominance and it should fade out as they learn what acceptable play is.

    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
    tynicDescendant XPhoenix-DElvenshaeZilla360chrishallett83Skeithjkylefulton
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    That is a nice info dump there, @Cello. Thank you for all of these tips. At your recommendation I started reading The Art of Raising a Puppy on iBooks and I'll be picking up a physical copy from my local bookstore on my way home from work.

    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
    Cello
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    Cello wrote: »
    Oh! Also! Don't freak out if your dog is a bit nippy. This is actually how puppies communicate and learn boundaries. If they try to nibble on you, yell OW! and then immediately stop playing with them. They're trying to sort out what is and is not okay as far as play goes. It isn't necessarily a sign of dominance and it should fade out as they learn what acceptable play is.

    Yeah, my sister-in-law has a dog that is quite nippy. I think at this point the little guy (he's over a year old now) may be too far gone to teach this lesson, and whenever I go over there I turn into a chew toy. He wrecked one of my favourite hoodies.

    I won't be making the same mistakes (read: all of them) with my pup that my sister-in-law made with theirs.

    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    Cello wrote: »
    Oh! Also! Don't freak out if your dog is a bit nippy. This is actually how puppies communicate and learn boundaries. If they try to nibble on you, yell OW! and then immediately stop playing with them. They're trying to sort out what is and is not okay as far as play goes. It isn't necessarily a sign of dominance and it should fade out as they learn what acceptable play is.

    Yeah, my sister-in-law has a dog that is quite nippy. I think at this point the little guy (he's over a year old now) may be too far gone to teach this lesson, and whenever I go over there I turn into a chew toy. He wrecked one of my favourite hoodies.

    I won't be making the same mistakes (read: all of them) with my pup that my sister-in-law made with theirs.

    Oh, at a year he's definitely not too far gone! The owners, though... Well, they have to make the decision to commit to correcting it.

    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
    tynicDonnictonjkylefulton
  • DonnictonDonnicton Hey it's me, your old pal Movie Sonic - let me in. LEMME IN. Registered User regular
    Get hooked up with a well-reviewed local vet ASAP and get a basic check-up within a few days of adoption to make sure everything looks good and your vaccinations are up to date/scheduled, as well as to get you on file

    Prior to full vaccinations, don't take your dog to a dog park or let them smell fecal matter on the street, they can get infections. Consider avoiding dog parks at least until they hit full growth, but even then be cautious about going to them at all - you might know your dog well, but you'd be surprised how many people bring dominant/"reactive" (ugh) dogs to a park and let them off-lead, only to bite another dog's face off

    I just want to highlight this part, because Parvo is usually a death sentence for puppies who haven't been vaccinated or fully vaccinated. Try to avoid association with unknown dogs and especially fecal matter until the full round of vaccinations are completed.

    I'd suggest reading up a bit on both Lab and Retrievers to get an idea of their breed quirks, because crossbreeds of purebreds tend to adopt tendencies from both breeds. Labs/Retrievers are pretty jovial breeds so it shouldn't be overly difficult to socialize/train, but it helps to recognize that even with training some baseline behaviors and traits are inherent to the breeds themselves.

    CelloHappylilElf
  • WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
    Also while your dog is a puppy, you want to try and expose them to as many situations as possible. Their brain is basically a sponge and most of what they experience during puppyhood they will experience and go 'oh this is normal'. Although as Cello mentioned, vaccinations are a priority before public spaces

    Take them to crowded places, take them in the car/on the bus/on the metro, have people pet them, have them meet people of different skin tones, play thunder and fireworks noises on youtube etc

    Descendant XtynicCello
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    edited February 26
    Here’s a question - how much unsupervised outdoor time should a puppy have, if any? We got new siding on our house last year and haven’t put our gate back up yet (I know, I know), so we don’t have an enclosed yard right now and probably won’t until late March if the weather warms up fairly quickly.

    I’m currently waking up earlier so I’ll be able to walk the dog first thing in the morning and we’ll be walking him in the evening as well. I imagine Mrs. Facepunch will also walk him during the afternoon before she goes to work.

    To add to this, we currently have three cats in the house. What kind of challenges might that bring?

    Descendant X on
    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    edited February 26
    RE: unsupervised outdoor time

    How are you doing that if you don't have a gate? Its terrible to leave a dog tethered outside unsupervised.

    for cats its depends on personality.

    it is going to be harder if the hats spook and run. if they swat the dog, he should learn. you just need to not let them interact unsupervised so you can train the proper treatment.

    keep him on leash and give a correction if he tries to go after/jump etc. i mean its a puppy so he is going to try to play with your cats, but he needs to learn to treat them well.

    best case, your cat hisses/swats him and your dog learns real fast not to mess with them.

    that said. cat dog interactions are hard. we tried two different dogs this summer and they all kept going after the cats so they couldn't stay. our cats have lived with dogs and were not afraid to show the dog who the boss was, but the dogs didn't learn

    mts on
    camo_sig.png
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    Yeah, I’m guessing the cats will teach the dog what’s what pretty quickly. We’ll definitely be keeping an eye on the situation.

    In regards to the yard, I was just wondering if the dog would absolutely need to be outdoors for long periods of time unsupervised. We’ll be keeping watch over him while he’s outside until we get the gate fixed.

    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    Yeah, I’m guessing the cats will teach the dog what’s what pretty quickly. We’ll definitely be keeping an eye on the situation.

    In regards to the yard, I was just wondering if the dog would absolutely need to be outdoors for long periods of time unsupervised. We’ll be keeping watch over him while he’s outside until we get the gate fixed.

    there's no reason for lengthy unsupervised outdoors time, no. Often it's unavoidable (work hours, etc), but as long as he's getting enough regular exercise then he should spend most of the day snoozing.

    Unsupervised young dogs can also get into all sorts of trouble - from digging up the garden, to escaping - just because they're bored. So generally I would err on the side of less time left to their own devices, rather than more, at least until they're old enough to be vaguely responsible (generally 2-ish).

    Descendant Xdispatch.oCelloElvenshaeSkeith
  • DemonStaceyDemonStacey TTODewback's Daughter In love with the TaySwayRegistered User regular
    Additional note: If you do not plan to have the dog sleep in bed with you be very strong those first couple nights.

    The first night will be the worst. Get some headphones ready. After that it gets better. Pending the dog of course sometimes day 1 will be fine, other times it may take 2-3 nights. After that the pupper knows you will be there in the morning and everything is A-OK.

    But if you give in at the start then all you have done was teach the dog that when it wants to come in your bedroom it just needs to whimper.

    desc wrote: »
    ~ * ~ Week-Long Dance-a-thon Booty Ribbon ~ * ~
    Descendant XCelloDonnicton
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    Yeah, I just read about the pup’s first night home in the book that Cello recommended. That won’t be happening, and the cats wouldn’t allow it anyway.

    Luckily for us our schedules work very well together and except for Monday the pup won’t be spending any more than an hour or so absolutely alone in a day in general. We’ll be crate training him and I’ll be taking the first Monday off after we get him to start things off.

    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
    CelloElvenshae
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    edited February 26
    I would put the crate in your room so he could see and smell you. If he cries take him out to pee, then right back in th crate no playing.

    mts on
    camo_sig.png
  • DarkewolfeDarkewolfe Registered User regular
    Additional note: If you do not plan to have the dog sleep in bed with you be very strong those first couple nights.

    The first night will be the worst. Get some headphones ready. After that it gets better. Pending the dog of course sometimes day 1 will be fine, other times it may take 2-3 nights. After that the pupper knows you will be there in the morning and everything is A-OK.

    But if you give in at the start then all you have done was teach the dog that when it wants to come in your bedroom it just needs to whimper.

    This period can last weeks. You cannot cave

    What is this I don't even.
    CelloElvenshaeDemonStacey
  • djmitchelladjmitchella Registered User regular
    Coincidentally, we also have a new puppy coming (last week of March), and the recommendation from the breeder there was one of these, so they have a feeling of someone to snuggle up with to make up for their missing litter mates:

    https://www.amazon.com/SmartPetLove-Snuggle-Puppy-Behavioral-Brown/dp/B000C9YHFS

    Descendant X
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    Does the person training the pup matter? By that I mean that Mrs. Facepunch will be spending the most time with him in general but I may be doing a great deal of the training. What effect might that have on the puppy’s behaviour?

    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
    It can matter with some breeds that tend to choose one person to listen to/obey but with a lab/retriever its probably fine as they are people pleasers in general.

    Also 'spending the most time with him in general' means doing a lot of training! Anything you want to teach your puppy, you should be trying to train consistently. Yes, you will have dedicated time for intensive training for specific commands, but nearly all time will be training time at those ages. Where to go to the bathroom. How to nap. How to go on a walk. How to not drive your wife crazy. Even if the puppy is playing you are going to be stopping them from trying to chew on things like furniture or socks or your hands etc. That needs to be training time as well. Puppies are babies. Its a lot of work!

    tynicIrukaDescendant XElvenshaeCelloSkeith
  • DonnictonDonnicton Hey it's me, your old pal Movie Sonic - let me in. LEMME IN. Registered User regular
    edited February 27
    Some breeds are programmed to attach to one person only and basically ignore everyone else(my mother's dog is one of those), but those aren't Labs or Goldens so that shouldn't be a concern as mentioned.

    Donnicton on
    Descendant X
  • Inquisitor77Inquisitor77 2 x Penny Arcade Fight Club Champion A fixed point in space and timeRegistered User regular
    It can matter with some breeds that tend to choose one person to listen to/obey but with a lab/retriever its probably fine as they are people pleasers in general.

    Also 'spending the most time with him in general' means doing a lot of training! Anything you want to teach your puppy, you should be trying to train consistently. Yes, you will have dedicated time for intensive training for specific commands, but nearly all time will be training time at those ages. Where to go to the bathroom. How to nap. How to go on a walk. How to not drive your wife crazy. Even if the puppy is playing you are going to be stopping them from trying to chew on things like furniture or socks or your hands etc. That needs to be training time as well. Puppies are babies. Its a lot of work!

    One thing to watch out for is that puppies are baby dogs, not baby humans. Baby humans are basically just lumps of inert mass that shit themselves for their first year of existence. Puppies are equivalent to toddlers right out the gate, which means they are able to mimic and learn complex behaviors from the get go. And they grow up fast.

    Treating everything that a puppy does as something innocuous and cute can often lead to poor conditioning. Imagine your puppy were a big dog from the start, and if it is doing something that you wouldn't want it to do as a big dog then don't let it do it as a small one (see: biting). Coincidentally, this is why toy dogs are often so misbehaved - people treat them like harmless puppies their entire lives and they become demon spawn because they're so physically unimposing. But if they behaved similarly as a larger breed they would probably be put down.

    Three things in human life are important: the first is to be kind; the second is to be kind; and the third is to be kind.
    CellotynicDonnictonElvenshaedispatch.oSkeithZilla360
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    It'll only really matter which of you is primarily training them if the dog is showing dominant behaviour towards one of you. Like, if they listen when you say "down!" And then act like a smartass when your wife makes the command, the dog thinks they're higher in the pecking order than her, and so she should do the training

    Otherwise, yeah, either one of you should be good to go, and it's good for both of you to at least do some portion of it so you understand the technique. Dogs actually work more off body language than verbal commands, so a lot of dog training is less training the dog than training the owner.

    Oh, on a note with toys - always check that your chewies and edible stuff come from whatever country you're in and not, say, China. And also, never play tug of war with the dog - they can do it with each other, but if they win against you it's like a little notch in the dominance tracker. Never play with sticks either - it's possible for them to bite through it or for it to break and get lodged in their mouth or throat, which ain't great.

    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
    Descendant X
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    Donnicton wrote: »
    Some breeds are programmed to attach to one person only and basically ignore everyone else(my mother's dog is one of those), but those aren't Labs or Goldens so that shouldn't be a concern as mentioned.

    Belgian Tervurens are supposed to do that!

    Ours attached to food.

    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
    tynicDonnictonElvenshaeJansonSkeithjkylefultonZilla360
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    yea, that is why i tell people don't let them do anything as a puppy you are not ok with them doing when they are full grown.

    ie. your bed, couch, jumping up.

    its important to nip things in the bud when they are still malleable.

    as far as training goes, you can't just have one 30 minute session and call it a day or week.

    first (most) puppies have the attention span of a nothing. They will lose focus after like 10 minutes. its better to just try and catch them doing things throughout the day. This also has the benefit of having them pay attention to you more often rather than during "training"

    the other thing is training can happen whenever. So i recomend always having a small bag of training treats or kibble in your pocket. you are sitting on the floor and the dog comes up to you, tell him good come and give him a treat. he sits on his own, good sit, give him a treat. etc.

    you really can do a lot with a quick 10-15 minute "session". Bonus is training tires them out so it is a good way to wind down.

    also make sure you and wife are on same page with what you are actually calling commands

    here vs come etc.

    this may seem advanced, but I would also use hand signals when you do voice commands.

    like for us, raising a closed fist was sit. palm flat moving down was laydown/down etc. we had a hand signal for most of our commands and it makes it easier to do stuff. by teaching with them from the begining it makes your life easier.

    camo_sig.png
    Descendant XCello
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    Our hand signals are:

    Sit: swoop your hand forward from your side to shoulder level, palm up (usually the right hand)

    Stand: Move your hand forward over the dog's head, palm facing them

    Heel: Left hand along the outside of their muzzle, moving forward; step forward with your left foot

    Down: raise your right hand like you're asking a question in class, palm facing the dog, in line with your shoulder

    Come: put your right arm out parallel to the ground, bend at the elbow, bring your palm to your chest

    The nice thing about those particular ones for Down and Come are the dog can see them from 50 feet away, which can be vital around traffic

    Oh! Puppy pro-tip, while I'm thinking about recall. A way to get an excitable dog to come to you is to be as nonthreatening as possible while being a big target. If you ever see a dog that's gotten away from its lead, oftentimes you can get it to come to you by kneeling down on both knees, throwing your arms out in a T pose, and leaning back. When the dog comes up to you, slowly bring your arms in to catch it. It doesn't work every time, but I've caught a few runaways on the street like that!

    I uh......I really like dogs, and training dogs, if this wasn't obvious by now

    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
    Zilla360
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    edited February 28
    How have you found that book to be @Cello? I'm enjoying it and think that I'd like to go by it when training, but there are obviously other ways to train out there that I'm probably unaware of.

    Along those lines, what do you think of clicker training?

    Descendant X on
    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • CelloCello Registered User regular
    edited February 28
    How have you found that book to be @Cello? I'm enjoying it and think that I'd like to go by it when training, but there are obviously other ways to train out there that I'm probably unaware of.

    Along those lines, what do you think of clicker training?

    Honestly, we don't do clicker training because you can use your voice as a reward/praise, and that's really all you need. Plus a couple of treats every now and then, depending on where you're at training the dog.

    Some folks say it has worked really well for them! I ah, personally think whoever decided to start selling $1 clickers for $10-20 a pop was a smart businessperson. But you can always try it and see if you find it effective.

    The style my parents base our training off of is entirely on the Monks of New Skete methodology, so it's been neat to read it and realize that I'd been following a lot of it with all of our dogs over my life just sort of learning it through osmosis.

    Cello on
    Steam
    3DS Friend Code: 0216-0898-6512
    Switch Friend Code: SW-7437-1538-7786
    Descendant X
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    Heh, I guess that’s true. That Monks of New Skete book is all about using your voice to check the dogs behaviour.

    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    as a random aside, this thread made me decide to check petfinder again and I ended up submitting an adoption application.

    camo_sig.png
    CelloInquisitor77Descendant XJansonWassermeloneMichaelLCDonnictondjmitchellaElvenshaeSkeith
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    edited March 1
    I finished reading The Art of Raising a Puppy today. It's a very good book, although at the end it trails off into a bit of a spiritual tangent that I could have done without which I suppose should be expected from a book written by monks. I'll be handing it off to Mrs. Facepunch to have a look at and I hope that I'll be able to put the training it describes into action.

    Eight days to go. I'm getting to be a bit nervous, but I'm also really excited about getting the little guy. It's going to be a lot of fun, I think.

    EDIT: I suppose I should include a picture. I mean, that's just how these things are done!

    7j15thctsl1n.jpeg

    Descendant X on
    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
    DonnictontynicCelloTerrendosWassermelonePowerpuppiesSkeithMichaelLCDevoutlyApatheticKoopahTroopahjkylefultonDemonStaceyPlatyasofyeunSatanIsMyMotorZilla360
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    edited March 1
    pff, looks like you just downloaded a photo of cute golden puppy off the internet. if this is true you need to go back and forget all my advice

    mts on
    camo_sig.png
    CelloDescendant XPowerpuppies
  • Red RaevynRed Raevyn because I only take Bubble Baths Registered User regular
    My top advice from having a dog and a close friend who has his own veterinary practice-
    • Brush your dog's teeth. They get used to it quickly and clean teeth have significant health benefits (just like us, no surprise) especially as they age.
    • Don't let them have tennis balls. They're bad in many ways.
    • Don't play tug-o-war. It's bad for their teeth, and beyond that it's a real joy to have a well-trained dog drop the damned thing he wants thrown, not fight you for it.
    • Find a vet who is evidence-based and put's the animal's welfare first. That they're pleasant to you and kind to the pet should be a given. You want them to objectively advocate for the best outcome for the animal that can't speak for itself.

    Descendant X
  • Descendant XDescendant X Hank Facepunch Registered User regular
    Yeah, playing tug-of-war is something that I've never liked to see with dogs. I couldn't imagine holding something in my teeth and having someone else pull on it, and I don't imagine that it's that comfortable for a dog either.

    Something used to be here. It's gone now.
  • Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    edited March 2
    Yeah, playing tug-of-war is something that I've never liked to see with dogs. I couldn't imagine holding something in my teeth and having someone else pull on it, and I don't imagine that it's that comfortable for a dog either.

    TBF you aren't built to grab and shake things to death with your teeth, which is a dog thing too.

    Phoenix-D on
    ElvenshaeInquisitor77tynicSkeithHappylilElfWassermeloneCelestialBadgerdispatch.oKoopahTroopahZilla360
  • WassermeloneWassermelone Registered User regular
    I've honestly never seen 'no tug of war' before this thread, but dog behavioral best practices is a bit of a moving target I suppose.

    Alma will play tug and then as soon as we say 'Give' she instantly goes BLEHP and drops it.

    NightDragonZilla360
  • Marty81Marty81 Registered User regular
    I’m currently waking up earlier so I’ll be able to walk the dog first thing in the morning and we’ll be walking him in the evening as well. I imagine Mrs. Facepunch will also walk him during the afternoon before she goes to work.

    Just wanted to say don't skimp on this. Walks have tremendous benefits for the dog. They reinforce the pack order and are good exercise. They are also very intellectually stimulating for the dog, and help alleviate boredom and restlessness that could otherwise lead to anxious/destructive behavior.

    tynicCelloWassermelone
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    I've honestly never seen 'no tug of war' before this thread, but dog behavioral best practices is a bit of a moving target I suppose.

    Alma will play tug and then as soon as we say 'Give' she instantly goes BLEHP and drops it.

    We don't really do tug with our dogs (though they love it), and if they try and start a session we alwaysmake them 'give' the toy before things get too strenuous. But it's interesting watching them play like that amongst themselves. The older dogs could easily take off with both toy and puppy attached, without trying, but they often just kind of pretend to pull and let the puppy win.

    CelloElvenshaeCaedwyr
  • Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    tynic wrote: »
    I've honestly never seen 'no tug of war' before this thread, but dog behavioral best practices is a bit of a moving target I suppose.

    Alma will play tug and then as soon as we say 'Give' she instantly goes BLEHP and drops it.

    We don't really do tug with our dogs (though they love it), and if they try and start a session we alwaysmake them 'give' the toy before things get too strenuous. But it's interesting watching them play like that amongst themselves. The older dogs could easily take off with both toy and puppy attached, without trying, but they often just kind of pretend to pull and let the puppy win.
    tynic wrote: »
    I've honestly never seen 'no tug of war' before this thread, but dog behavioral best practices is a bit of a moving target I suppose.

    Alma will play tug and then as soon as we say 'Give' she instantly goes BLEHP and drops it.

    We don't really do tug with our dogs (though they love it), and if they try and start a session we alwaysmake them 'give' the toy before things get too strenuous. But it's interesting watching them play like that amongst themselves. The older dogs could easily take off with both toy and puppy attached, without trying, but they often just kind of pretend to pull and let the puppy win.

    There was nothing quite so hilarious as watching my 50lb Shiba mix play tug of war with the 7lb chihuahua. Just sort of half-hearted light tugs until YOINK sorry we're done now.

  • The Zombie PenguinThe Zombie Penguin Registered User regular
    Marty81 wrote: »
    I’m currently waking up earlier so I’ll be able to walk the dog first thing in the morning and we’ll be walking him in the evening as well. I imagine Mrs. Facepunch will also walk him during the afternoon before she goes to work.

    Just wanted to say don't skimp on this. Walks have tremendous benefits for the dog. They reinforce the pack order and are good exercise. They are also very intellectually stimulating for the dog, and help alleviate boredom and restlessness that could otherwise lead to anxious/destructive behavior.

    The other real benefit is when you walk a puppy extensively, you tend to get an adorably sleepy puppy for the next day. (We once took our pet dalmatian for 3 different walks with different family members in one day, whcih he adored. He spent the next day+ asleep as a result)

    One thing to be aware of is that stuff that's noisy but not unpleasant to us (Vacum Cleaners, a squeaky ironing board, etc) can be right terrifying to dogs. So training around not freaking out about noises like that might be helpful, though i'd defer to others here.

    A good dog brush and regular grooming can really help with avoiding finding hair all over the house. Dogs tend to LOVE being brushed as well. Bath time can be a whole different affair, and i'm really not up on best-practices there.

    Ideas hate it when you anthropomorphize them.
    3DS: Penguin: 3883 - 5570 - 4552
    Descendant X
  • mtsmts Registered User regular
    Keep in mind depending on the breed of the puppy you don't want to go on a lot of walks until they get bigger. Normal playing around the house is probably enough for a bit

    camo_sig.png
    tynicSkeithNightDragon
«1
Sign In or Register to comment.