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Penny Arcade - Comic - Return of The Lip

DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
edited June 2019 in The Penny Arcade Hub

imagePenny Arcade - Comic - Return of The Lip

Videogaming-related online strip by Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins. Includes news and commentary.

Read the full story here


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    LieutenantDanLieutenantDan Registered User regular
    The Lip makes Gabe look like a Gorillaz character

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    SonneillonSonneillon Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
    I figured the "Lip" in question was a referring to the back to back return from the same "Woo" lips from the previous strip. This lip has layers, lip layers, like a lip onion. A venerable French onion lip.

    Sonneillon on
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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Fantastic facial expressions in the last panel.

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    ValeroisValerois Registered User regular
    Well, with any luck the resulting game will be better than another D&D port. I mean, seriuosly, people need to know there's more to the world of RPGs than D&D, and no amount of porting may make its rules and mechanics be subpar when applied to entirely different experiences. Well, at least when compared with games properly designed from the ground up to empower those experiences (emphasis on "properly", which is often not the case I admit).

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    The Lip makes Gabe look like a Gorillaz character

    While I can see where you're coming from, the Gorillaz tend to have an overbite, if anything:

    71lix6%2BVfWL._SY800_.jpg

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    zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    Luckily I have headphones because someone's (me) going to be Youtubing Feel Good Inc.

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    AssuranAssuran Is swinging on the Spiral Registered User regular
    Every DM has been there.

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    T-DangerT-Danger Registered User regular
    I confess, the joke is lost on me. Is Gabe pissed because he's just realised his version of Sea of Thieves has the same problems the video game has?

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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    T-Danger wrote: »
    I confess, the joke is lost on me. Is Gabe pissed because he's just realised his version of Sea of Thieves has the same problems the video game has?

    I think he's peeved that he spent months writing rules for his campaign only to have a system come out with all that work done right as he's finishing getting it all ready.

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    Prof ZachProf Zach Registered User new member
    This was lost on my too.

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    GreenKometGreenKomet Registered User new member
    Gabe should've just played 7th Sea instead of going through all this work.

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    tastydonutstastydonuts Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
    Assuran wrote: »
    Every DM has been there.

    Anthem and Mass Effect: Andromeda, of all games really have killed two of my settings. Well, I mean I can still use them, it's just... weird now.

    And while there are other PNP RPG systems... the D20 system (D&D) is one of the most straightforward and simplest to learn, sans expansions and obscura... doesn't surprise me that they would go with that. It's vanilla ice cream at a buffet with unlimited toppings... there's a certain point wherein you're just eating toppings and vanilla flavored milk. So you throw it out and make another bowl and do the same thing to it.

    tastydonuts on
    “I used to draw, hard to admit that I used to draw...”
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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular

    And while there are other PNP RPG systems... the D20 system (D&D) is one of the most straightforward and simplest to learn, sans expansions and obscura... doesn't surprise me that they would go with that. It's vanilla ice cream at a buffet with unlimited toppings... there's a certain point wherein you're just eating toppings and vanilla flavored milk. So you throw it out and make another bowl and do the same thing to it.

    I played Pathfinder once and have just written up a character for a play-by-post that uses d&d 2nde (with Skills and Powers which is I guess an add-on?). I found both systems to be utterly, unnecessarily convoluted. The homebrew system I learned to game on is very simple.
    Stats from 5-20, you get a certain number of Stat Points to spend on them. Roll beneath a stat on a d20 to succeed at a stat check. Skills allow you to do certain things or to do them better, usually give you a percentile score based on level and two governing stats. Roll beneath the skill score on a d100 to succeed. You get a certain number of skill points to spend on what skills you have. Combat is roll higher than enemy armor class on d20, with bonuses from stats and skills. No rolling in character creation, no classes or kits or class levels. Buy what combo of skills you can afford.

    Now, there's lots of different ways to build a system: Warhammer Fantasy RPG is quite different from ours and still pretty good. But I'm just surprised the king of RPGs is generally so hard to parse. Granted I have not tried the latest edition, but both 2e and Pathfinder seem to have so many die hard defenders and it just surprises me. Trying to grasp THAC0 from a game design standpoint left me wondering how it could have any defenders at all.

    The more I get into board game culture, where people love *complex* games, but where games that are hard to learn to teach are considered worse for it...the harder it is for me to understand the tendency of rpg and Warhammer fans to wear imperceptible rules as a badge of honor.

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    tastydonutstastydonuts Registered User regular
    edited June 2019

    And while there are other PNP RPG systems... the D20 system (D&D) is one of the most straightforward and simplest to learn, sans expansions and obscura... doesn't surprise me that they would go with that. It's vanilla ice cream at a buffet with unlimited toppings... there's a certain point wherein you're just eating toppings and vanilla flavored milk. So you throw it out and make another bowl and do the same thing to it.

    I played Pathfinder once and have just written up a character for a play-by-post that uses d&d 2nde (with Skills and Powers which is I guess an add-on?). I found both systems to be utterly, unnecessarily convoluted. The homebrew system I learned to game on is very simple.
    Stats from 5-20, you get a certain number of Stat Points to spend on them. Roll beneath a stat on a d20 to succeed at a stat check. Skills allow you to do certain things or to do them better, usually give you a percentile score based on level and two governing stats. Roll beneath the skill score on a d100 to succeed. You get a certain number of skill points to spend on what skills you have. Combat is roll higher than enemy armor class on d20, with bonuses from stats and skills. No rolling in character creation, no classes or kits or class levels. Buy what combo of skills you can afford.

    Now, there's lots of different ways to build a system: Warhammer Fantasy RPG is quite different from ours and still pretty good. But I'm just surprised the king of RPGs is generally so hard to parse. Granted I have not tried the latest edition, but both 2e and Pathfinder seem to have so many die hard defenders and it just surprises me. Trying to grasp THAC0 from a game design standpoint left me wondering how it could have any defenders at all.

    The more I get into board game culture, where people love *complex* games, but where games that are hard to learn to teach are considered worse for it...the harder it is for me to understand the tendency of rpg and Warhammer fans to wear imperceptible rules as a badge of honor.

    Pathfinder isn't Wizards (D&D) though... 2nd edition DnD is as old or older than both of us certain is for me. IDK. Pathfinder was Paizo's callback to 3.5E, written primarily due to the restrictions and whatnot with the new 4E OGL (also lol, PDFs?) and sweeping mechanical changes of 4E, a lot of which were ditched with 5E. Still no PDfs though.

    At its simplest, with 3.5/4/5E you have a skill and its modifiers and a target to beat... you roll your d20. That's pretty much it. No unders, none of that.

    I think a D20 Sea of Thieves would be neat, but also not sure how the ganking and robbing your fellow players would work in a PNP setting. Though I guess players could choose not do that. But there's always one guy at the table...

    tastydonuts on
    “I used to draw, hard to admit that I used to draw...”
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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    I think I mainly hang out with old people. But many of said old people swear by 2e and THAC0. And Pathfinder was always pitched to me as a preservation of the best D&D. I didn't find that one to be too bad, certainly not as bad as 2e, and a well run game is fun either way. But it still seemed like a book that tried to be as long as possible instead of the other way around. In board games it's generally agreed upon that a shorter book is a better book. If I say that to a "published rpg" player or wargamer I get branded a heretic, or worse, a casual.

    I guess this ties into the discussion topic because people have said that D&D is the most prolific and the most adapted to other IPs because it is the easiest to pick up, and I just don't see that.

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    zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    I think I mainly hang out with old people. But many of said old people swear by 2e and THAC0. And Pathfinder was always pitched to me as a preservation of the best D&D. I didn't find that one to be too bad, certainly not as bad as 2e, and a well run game is fun either way. But it still seemed like a book that tried to be as long as possible instead of the other way around. In board games it's generally agreed upon that a shorter book is a better book. If I say that to a "published rpg" player or wargamer I get branded a heretic, or worse, a casual.

    I guess this ties into the discussion topic because people have said that D&D is the most prolific and the most adapted to other IPs because it is the easiest to pick up, and I just don't see that.
    5e is pretty good. It’s not as archaic as 2e or pathfinder, although I know of pathfinder groups that have been running for a almost a decade. Like they just don’t stop.

    I think though I can’t play an old school system of anything honestly, I like the simplified systems too much. I found some old Palladium stuff and winced at how bad that system is and never had any real revisions in mechanics.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
    I think I mainly hang out with old people. But many of said old people swear by 2e and THAC0. And Pathfinder was always pitched to me as a preservation of the best D&D. I didn't find that one to be too bad, certainly not as bad as 2e, and a well run game is fun either way. But it still seemed like a book that tried to be as long as possible instead of the other way around. In board games it's generally agreed upon that a shorter book is a better book. If I say that to a "published rpg" player or wargamer I get branded a heretic, or worse, a casual.

    I guess this ties into the discussion topic because people have said that D&D is the most prolific and the most adapted to other IPs because it is the easiest to pick up, and I just don't see that.

    The complaint is just so weird because they haven't used THAC0 for about 20 years. It's understandable to think it's outdated and should be replaced, since it is and it was.

    dennis on
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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    The complaint is just so weird because they haven't used THAC0 for about 20 years. It's understandable to think it's outdated and should be replaced, since it is and it was.

    Not intended as a complaint. Like I said, the game I just joined uses 2e with THAC0 and all, and it's run by a DM who seems pretty committed to easy going gaming with a focus on story. I have nothing against D&D as a system and certainly can't complain or even comment on the current edition, since I've never played it. My confusion was about player perception: like I said, in my area I have had several players insist that 2e was the best, or that Pathfinder is the best because 3.5 was the best. I haven't really had anyone try to pitch the current system to me, and any comments about it are in reference to the older stuff being better. And I understand nostalgia or just wanting to keep using what you are used to. It's just that defense for archaic, impenetrable, and outdated systems that confuses me. But maybe this is irrelevant because maybe most people have moved on to newer, better systems outside my group of grumpy old men. :)

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    MarcinMNMarcinMN Registered User regular
    All this D&D edition talk made me think of this comic:

    itx1bhlg70ui.jpg

    "It's just as I've always said. We are being digested by an amoral universe."

    -Tycho Brahe
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    FuzFuz Registered User regular
    I don't get it.

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    I Apologised on 4chanI Apologised on 4chan Registered User new member
    I have sunk real money into various Mongoose products over the last 15 years and I am genuinely suprised that Mongoose games still exist.
    I literally cannot fathom how they have managed to survive, it must be entirely off the back of Traveller, a game which they merely own the license to and did not actually come up with themselves.
    Mongoose are roughly speaking the least competent tabletop company I have ever known, and how they keep getting licences baffles me. I mean the industry in general, but Mongoose specifically.

    Over the years Mongoose has managed to get and then lose through their own fumbling fingers the following properties: Babylon 5, Starship Troopers, Judge Dredd, Strontium Dog, ADB's Starfleet Battles (HOW!?) Fading Suns, Conan the Barbarian... and probably others I'm forgetting. How, how do they keep getting these licensing deals?
    SERIOUSLY, THEIR SHOP PAGE FRONT HAS A PICTURE OF A MODEL THEY HAVEN'T SOLD IN ALMOST TEN YEARS ON IT, AND CAN'T SELL BECAUSE OF LEGAL COPYRIGHT.
    How can they even afford all of these? It's like living next door to a cartoon sitcom character and wondering where on earth this bumbling bufoon is getting the money for helicopters with his own face on the front, or how he is keeping his family fed without seemingly doing any real work for the last three seasons.
    Seriously these licences cost serious money, the Halo license broke Spartan games, well, the Halo license and their much documented ADHD where they could never focus on a single product line and had to keep making new ones every three months, but mostly the Halo license.

    I've gotten offtrack. The point I am making is, if their writing is about the same as it has always been up to date, I wouldn't worry about it, odds are good your homebrew will be better.

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    SchadrachSchadrach Registered User regular
    Speaking of Mongoose, they at one point were publishing a new hardback edition of the Lone Wolf series by Joe Dever. Literally all they had to do was formatting and printing, so I figured it was a safe bet.

    Then they offered a preorder where the books would be heavily discounted if you paid up front for the whole series, including 4 new books that would be written by Dever. I bit.

    They had increasingly bad problems over time, and book 2 has a different textual issue that makes no damn sense and breaks it than the original version. Partway through they failed badly enough to lose the license and offered everyone on the preorder a deal - either they'd pay you back what you gave them less the full retail price of the books received or give you the full amount you received as store credit.

    ...and that, dear friends is why I now have a small library of no out of print Mongoose products, including an entire edition of Paranoia.

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    I Apologised on 4chanI Apologised on 4chan Registered User new member
    My Mongoose memory is all the way back to when they were doing the Starship Troopers wargame, and prior to their release of a dedicated Mobile Infantry armybook, had been bigging up one of their new beefier power-armour designs (I think it might actually be the one currently on its shop frontpage) several preview articles had it visible front and center, along with glowing reports of it's ability to nuclearate it's Arachnid opponents. It was their flagpole model for the new wave of MI models to come.

    And then Mongoose forgot to put that new unit in the book.

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    PeriSoftPeriSoft Registered User regular
    215207112_HcBCF-2100x20000.jpg

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    SyzygySyzygy Registered User regular
    Assuran wrote: »
    Every DM has been there.

    Anthem and Mass Effect: Andromeda, of all games really have killed two of my settings. Well, I mean I can still use them, it's just... weird now.

    And while there are other PNP RPG systems... the D20 system (D&D) is one of the most straightforward and simplest to learn, sans expansions and obscura... doesn't surprise me that they would go with that. It's vanilla ice cream at a buffet with unlimited toppings... there's a certain point wherein you're just eating toppings and vanilla flavored milk. So you throw it out and make another bowl and do the same thing to it.

    I'll have to disagree with you there. The D100 system used in the likes of Dark Heresy is the simplest and easiest to explain to newcomers. See that number on your character sheet? That's literally your the percent chance of success when you roll. Boom, we're done, we can play the game now.

    There aren't any layers of weird bullshit where having a 17 in Strength for some reason is only equal to a strength bonus of +3, and don't get me started on trying to explain flat footed AC versus touch AC.

    The d20 system is a gosh dang MESS. Hell, even Interlock (used in Cyberpunk 2020) is easier to explain and learn since it's literally "Add your skill + reliant stat + d10, compare to target DC".

    And that weird poker system Deadlands Hell On Earth (and maybe just normal deadlands? I never played the original Old West setting ones, I prefer sci fi stuff) was way more intuitive after I read the rules on it, and you had to have like two decks of cards and three different kinds of poker chips to play that shit.

    Ugh, don't get me started on Starfinder and the shambling, bloated monstrosity that Pathfinder has become.

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    simonwolfsimonwolf i can feel a difference today, a differenceRegistered User regular
    imagine playing games where you roll dice instead of immersing yourself in diceless LARPs about the struggles with faith faced by doomed Cathars in 13th century France smdh

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    I Apologised on 4chanI Apologised on 4chan Registered User new member
    simonwolf wrote: »
    imagine playing games where you roll dice instead of immersing yourself in diceless LARPs about the struggles with faith faced by doomed Cathars in 13th century France smdh

    Imagine LARPing as frenchmen when you could be an invading Viking in the entourage of Cnut the Great in 1016 conquering England.

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    DjiemDjiem Registered User regular
    Imagine LARPing when you could just do these things!

    To the wayback machine!

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    EnlongEnlong Registered User regular
    Flat-footed is your usual defenses without the Dexterity bonus, because you can’t dodge. Touch is your usual defenses without the armor bonus, because blocking is useless.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Syzygy wrote: »
    Assuran wrote: »
    Every DM has been there.

    Anthem and Mass Effect: Andromeda, of all games really have killed two of my settings. Well, I mean I can still use them, it's just... weird now.

    And while there are other PNP RPG systems... the D20 system (D&D) is one of the most straightforward and simplest to learn, sans expansions and obscura... doesn't surprise me that they would go with that. It's vanilla ice cream at a buffet with unlimited toppings... there's a certain point wherein you're just eating toppings and vanilla flavored milk. So you throw it out and make another bowl and do the same thing to it.

    I'll have to disagree with you there. The D100 system used in the likes of Dark Heresy is the simplest and easiest to explain to newcomers. See that number on your character sheet? That's literally your the percent chance of success when you roll. Boom, we're done, we can play the game now.

    There aren't any layers of weird bullshit where having a 17 in Strength for some reason is only equal to a strength bonus of +3, and don't get me started on trying to explain flat footed AC versus touch AC.

    The d20 system is a gosh dang MESS. Hell, even Interlock (used in Cyberpunk 2020) is easier to explain and learn since it's literally "Add your skill + reliant stat + d10, compare to target DC".

    And that weird poker system Deadlands Hell On Earth (and maybe just normal deadlands? I never played the original Old West setting ones, I prefer sci fi stuff) was way more intuitive after I read the rules on it, and you had to have like two decks of cards and three different kinds of poker chips to play that shit.

    Ugh, don't get me started on Starfinder and the shambling, bloated monstrosity that Pathfinder has become.

    So, do your GMs tell you the number you have to roll for success before you decide whether you are going to attempt something?

    Honestly curious. It seems like you're not just playing with a different game system, but an entirely different mindset than a lot of the people that enjoy D&D.

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    tastydonutstastydonuts Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
    Syzygy wrote: »
    Assuran wrote: »
    Every DM has been there.

    Anthem and Mass Effect: Andromeda, of all games really have killed two of my settings. Well, I mean I can still use them, it's just... weird now.

    And while there are other PNP RPG systems... the D20 system (D&D) is one of the most straightforward and simplest to learn, sans expansions and obscura... doesn't surprise me that they would go with that. It's vanilla ice cream at a buffet with unlimited toppings... there's a certain point wherein you're just eating toppings and vanilla flavored milk. So you throw it out and make another bowl and do the same thing to it.

    I'll have to disagree with you there. The D100 system used in the likes of Dark Heresy is the simplest and easiest to explain to newcomers. See that number on your character sheet? That's literally your the percent chance of success when you roll. Boom, we're done, we can play the game now.

    There aren't any layers of weird bullshit where having a 17 in Strength for some reason is only equal to a strength bonus of +3, and don't get me started on trying to explain flat footed AC versus touch AC.

    The d20 system is a gosh dang MESS. Hell, even Interlock (used in Cyberpunk 2020) is easier to explain and learn since it's literally "Add your skill + reliant stat + d10, compare to target DC".

    And that weird poker system Deadlands Hell On Earth (and maybe just normal deadlands? I never played the original Old West setting ones, I prefer sci fi stuff) was way more intuitive after I read the rules on it, and you had to have like two decks of cards and three different kinds of poker chips to play that shit.

    Ugh, don't get me started on Starfinder and the shambling, bloated monstrosity that Pathfinder has become.

    As far as I know, there is no flat-footed or touch mechanic in the current edition (5E) of D&D, and there wasn't a flat-footed mechanic in 4E either. The whole vanilla ice cream at a buffet thing is a reference to how the editions start off simple then get bloated and complex and just... hey, let's just make a new edition.

    I searched for information on Dark Hersey and the first thing I got was a longform post about how convoluted it was, so... IDK. I imagine this is probably a discussion better served in a different thread?

    Is their Sea of Thieves game actually using a d20 system or something else?

    ediT: fixed quote

    tastydonuts on
    “I used to draw, hard to admit that I used to draw...”
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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
    (retracted due to fixed quote - thanks!)

    dennis on
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    tastydonutstastydonuts Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
    dennis wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    Syzygy wrote: »
    Assuran wrote: »
    Every DM has been there.

    Anthem and Mass Effect: Andromeda, of all games really have killed two of my settings. Well, I mean I can still use them, it's just... weird now.

    And while there are other PNP RPG systems... the D20 system (D&D) is one of the most straightforward and simplest to learn, sans expansions and obscura... doesn't surprise me that they would go with that. It's vanilla ice cream at a buffet with unlimited toppings... there's a certain point wherein you're just eating toppings and vanilla flavored milk. So you throw it out and make another bowl and do the same thing to it.

    I'll have to disagree with you there. The D100 system used in the likes of Dark Heresy is the simplest and easiest to explain to newcomers. See that number on your character sheet? That's literally your the percent chance of success when you roll. Boom, we're done, we can play the game now.

    There aren't any layers of weird bullshit where having a 17 in Strength for some reason is only equal to a strength bonus of +3, and don't get me started on trying to explain flat footed AC versus touch AC.

    The d20 system is a gosh dang MESS. Hell, even Interlock (used in Cyberpunk 2020) is easier to explain and learn since it's literally "Add your skill + reliant stat + d10, compare to target DC".

    And that weird poker system Deadlands Hell On Earth (and maybe just normal deadlands? I never played the original Old West setting ones, I prefer sci fi stuff) was way more intuitive after I read the rules on it, and you had to have like two decks of cards and three different kinds of poker chips to play that shit.

    Ugh, don't get me started on Starfinder and the shambling, bloated monstrosity that Pathfinder has become.

    So, do your GMs tell you the number you have to roll for success before you decide whether you are going to attempt something?

    Honestly curious. It seems like you're not just playing with a different game system, but an entirely different mindset than a lot of the people that enjoy D&D.

    As far as I know, there is no flat-footed or touch mechanic in the current edition (5E) of D&D, and there wasn't a flat-footed mechanic in 4E either. The whole vanilla ice cream at a buffet thing is a reference to how the editions start off simple then get bloated and complex and just... hey, let's just make a new edition.

    I wasn't asking how the system worked. I was simply asking if in their games, a big part of it is characters knowing what die roll they need before they roll it and the GM telling them if they succeeded. Because the purported benefit was how easy it was for players to just look at their character sheet and see what they needed to roll. (Though clearly that's not the percent chance to hit ANYTHING, and there must be some sort of modifications when fighting a goblin vs fighting a dragon.)

    I get it when it's a complaint about a GM having to do the math, but in this case, it didn't really seem that was the complaint.

    Post is in reply to Syzygy, but I quoted you, sorry.

    Also, based off this photo it's not a D20 system:

    c82ejiatmj7s.png

    Mongoose also has a 20 pack of d6 labelled for the game too (link)

    tastydonuts on
    “I used to draw, hard to admit that I used to draw...”
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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    dennis wrote: »
    Syzygy wrote: »
    Assuran wrote: »
    Every DM has been there.

    Anthem and Mass Effect: Andromeda, of all games really have killed two of my settings. Well, I mean I can still use them, it's just... weird now.

    And while there are other PNP RPG systems... the D20 system (D&D) is one of the most straightforward and simplest to learn, sans expansions and obscura... doesn't surprise me that they would go with that. It's vanilla ice cream at a buffet with unlimited toppings... there's a certain point wherein you're just eating toppings and vanilla flavored milk. So you throw it out and make another bowl and do the same thing to it.

    I'll have to disagree with you there. The D100 system used in the likes of Dark Heresy is the simplest and easiest to explain to newcomers. See that number on your character sheet? That's literally your the percent chance of success when you roll. Boom, we're done, we can play the game now.

    There aren't any layers of weird bullshit where having a 17 in Strength for some reason is only equal to a strength bonus of +3, and don't get me started on trying to explain flat footed AC versus touch AC.

    The d20 system is a gosh dang MESS. Hell, even Interlock (used in Cyberpunk 2020) is easier to explain and learn since it's literally "Add your skill + reliant stat + d10, compare to target DC".

    And that weird poker system Deadlands Hell On Earth (and maybe just normal deadlands? I never played the original Old West setting ones, I prefer sci fi stuff) was way more intuitive after I read the rules on it, and you had to have like two decks of cards and three different kinds of poker chips to play that shit.

    Ugh, don't get me started on Starfinder and the shambling, bloated monstrosity that Pathfinder has become.

    So, do your GMs tell you the number you have to roll for success before you decide whether you are going to attempt something?

    Honestly curious. It seems like you're not just playing with a different game system, but an entirely different mindset than a lot of the people that enjoy D&D.

    As far as I know, there is no flat-footed or touch mechanic in the current edition (5E) of D&D, and there wasn't a flat-footed mechanic in 4E either. The whole vanilla ice cream at a buffet thing is a reference to how the editions start off simple then get bloated and complex and just... hey, let's just make a new edition.

    I wasn't asking how the system worked. I was simply asking if in their games, a big part of it is characters knowing what die roll they need before they roll it and the GM telling them if they succeeded. Because the purported benefit was how easy it was for players to just look at their character sheet and see what they needed to roll. (Though clearly that's not the percent chance to hit ANYTHING, and there must be some sort of modifications when fighting a goblin vs fighting a dragon.)

    I get it when it's a complaint about a GM having to do the math, but in this case, it didn't really seem that was the complaint.

    Post is in reply to Syzygy, but I quoted you, sorry.

    Also, based off this photo it's not a D20 system:

    c82ejiatmj7s.png

    Mongoose also has a 20 pack of d6 labelled for the game too (link)


    Yeah, I think in his news post, Jerry likened it more to the storytelling custom dice style of the Star Wars RPG.

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