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The future of gaming hardware!

pichuscutepichuscute IndianaRegistered User regular
I'm interested in what you guys think the future of gaming hardware is going to be like. It's a very strange time for the industry in this regard, where mobile phones are more important than ever, home consoles are less relevant than ever, and the handheld market pretty much entirely consists of the hybrid: the Nintendo Switch. But that in no way tells the whole story and it's a very complicated topic. So, what do you guys think we're going to see moving forward?

Personally, I've a bit of the mindset that home consoles are getting too inconvenient to continue to command the interest or attention they have in the past, particularly with current the lack of innovation, games' reduced quality (or perceived quality from the nickle & dime-ing), and the consoles going mostly digital (meaning you're getting less for your money and the differences between platforms start to matter much, much less). Personally, convenience is key in making a successful platform, which is why I'd say something closer to the Nintendo Switch might be the more reasonable approach for us to see. I don't know if that will ever mean we'll get anything else like that (probably not), but it may mean Nintendo will win back more market share like they have had in the past.

That all said, having no stake in the matter myself (sold all my current consoles and just play retro stuff these days, which is much more enjoyable for me), I'm mostly just a bystander curious to see what others think. So, thoughts?

A developer on the typing dungeon crawler Backspace Bouken!

Fav game series: Zelda, Mario Kart, WipEout, Final Fantasy, SMT, Custom Robo, Mirror's Edge.

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    TehSpectreTehSpectre Registered User regular
    VR, but it still has a long way to go.

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    pichuscutepichuscute IndianaRegistered User regular
    TehSpectre wrote: »
    VR, but it still has a long way to go.

    This is a good point. I didn't mention VR in my opening post, but it's a bit of a wild card, I think. If developers can sort out how to get enough people to use it/own the hardware, it may become usable enough to offer the best gaming experiences ever so far. But, right now it still has by far the highest barrier to entry of any gaming platform, making it a really hard sell. This is especially true when you realize that the gaming experiences on the platform don't really line up with consumer expectations of what someone might actually want in VR. A lot of the experiences are more inline with movies, while a player might be looking for a bunch of games that are comparable to something like Skyrim or Final Fantasy: full-scale explore-able worlds. Developers will definitely need to find a way to close that gap in a big way.

    Fixing walking might help, too, lol.

    A developer on the typing dungeon crawler Backspace Bouken!

    Fav game series: Zelda, Mario Kart, WipEout, Final Fantasy, SMT, Custom Robo, Mirror's Edge.
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    ZekZek Registered User regular
    What's inconvenient about consoles if what I want is to play a game on my TV in my living room? That use case hasn't gone anywhere.

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    asofyeunasofyeun Registered User regular
    someone in the E3 thread mentioned the Stadia - streaming games instead of playing them on your device. I would say we're still fairly distant from it, but that'll be it - the future of gaming hardware is no hardware, just a terminal or other device that receives game stream service.

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    TehSpectreTehSpectre Registered User regular
    Hey man, Sega Channel had its chance.
    i really loved sega channel

    9u72nmv0y64e.jpg
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    NightslyrNightslyr Registered User regular
    TehSpectre wrote: »
    Hey man, Sega Channel had its chance.
    i really loved sega channel

    SEGA Channel saved my sanity. No joke.

    When I was 12-13, I had severe scoliosis. Like, 89 degree curve to the left around my heart/lungs severe. I had surgery just around my birthday in February 1994, and actually grew several inches because of getting literally straightened out. Unfortunately, I was too tall to fit into our modified for a wheelchair/lift van. So, outside of medical appointments (one of Medicaid/Medicare/my mom's insurance paid for accessible travel) and school (hooray lift-equipped short busses), I was stuck at home.

    For over two years.

    So, yeah... having a constantly rotating catalogue of games to play when there was literally nothing else to do as a disabled teen living in a rural area and no way to go anywhere was a huge help to my mental state. I mean, when you need to use an electric wheelchair to do anything you already feel trapped. Actually being trapped on top of it is a pretty tough situation to deal with.

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    pichuscutepichuscute IndianaRegistered User regular
    Zek wrote: »
    What's inconvenient about consoles if what I want is to play a game on my TV in my living room? That use case hasn't gone anywhere.

    That use case surely still exists, but I do think it might be shrinking alongside other aspects of living getting more expensive. I know I don't know a single friend who lives in a place with a true living room, and I certainly don't. They share a place with many roommates, or live in a single room apartment, or any number of things like that. My personal setup is also all entirely contained in a bedroom. Do I play games on a TV in my room sometimes, though? Definitely. It's just a lot less convenient with such limited space, in my opinion.

    A developer on the typing dungeon crawler Backspace Bouken!

    Fav game series: Zelda, Mario Kart, WipEout, Final Fantasy, SMT, Custom Robo, Mirror's Edge.
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    WotanAnubisWotanAnubis Registered User regular
    I don't think consoles are going anywhere. A game machine for playing games is a niche that PC and mobile don't quite fill. Not to mention the fact that mobile games and console games don't seem to have that much in the way of overlap.

    But what 'the future' is? I expect Sony and Microsoft to keep bringing out more powerful machines and I expect Nintendo continuing to do experimental Nintendo stuff.

    Wide-spread VR is probably coming, but don't ask me when. Although I do believe that VR is closer to being feasible than a streaming-only console.

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    GMaster7GMaster7 Goggles Paesano Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
    Nightslyr wrote: »
    TehSpectre wrote: »
    Hey man, Sega Channel had its chance.
    i really loved sega channel

    SEGA Channel saved my sanity. No joke.

    When I was 12-13, I had severe scoliosis. Like, 89 degree curve to the left around my heart/lungs severe. I had surgery just around my birthday in February 1994, and actually grew several inches because of getting literally straightened out. Unfortunately, I was too tall to fit into our modified for a wheelchair/lift van. So, outside of medical appointments (one of Medicaid/Medicare/my mom's insurance paid for accessible travel) and school (hooray lift-equipped short busses), I was stuck at home.

    For over two years.

    So, yeah... having a constantly rotating catalogue of games to play when there was literally nothing else to do as a disabled teen living in a rural area and no way to go anywhere was a huge help to my mental state. I mean, when you need to use an electric wheelchair to do anything you already feel trapped. Actually being trapped on top of it is a pretty tough situation to deal with.

    Sorry that you went through that, but I'm glad you had something to make it slightly less difficult. Sega Channel was the shit and always will be. Truly a revolutionary product, ahead of its time.

    In an alternate universe, instead of releasing these Sega Collections for $40 or whatever, Sega would have released an app that allowed you to subscribe for $2-5/mo and featured a (huge) rotating selection of Sega games from throughout their history. A modern Sega-Channel-meets-Netflix. But that ship has sailed. I guess we're getting the Mega Drive Classic soon (with 42 games on it), which is sorta the only other thing you can do today.

    On-topic: There's going to be increased diversity in control and display as technology continues to improve. I think that means more VR, cheaper VR, better VR - and more motion controls, cheaper motion controls, better motion controls. That's exciting, because there are games you can make in VR that simply don't/can't exist - or aren't nearly as worth playing - on a TV, and I think VR as an "experience-provider" will find an audience when the tech is cheap and convenient enough. Maybe the killer app is the live Mars landing, viewed through VR? Maybe it's a World Cup? Maybe it's Fortnite VR. Or maybe the masses are always going to resist putting a goofy headset on their head if they get most of the way there by looking at a screen.

    I think "flat" gaming will continue to be dominant, because it feels like it's always going to be the path of least resistance, but what happens when new/unforeseeable hardware finds the same ubiquity that we have today with TVs? That's a fun question.

    For example, everyone has a smartphone. Huge proliferation. There's no wider audience. Therefore, AR (see: Pokemon Go, Dragon Quest Walk, Minecraft Earth) has become a viable gametype, even if the novelty has worn off a bit. I'm trying to think of what might follow that. More sophisticated AR through AR glasses? Eventually, but not anytime soon. Gamified driving through higher-tech cars? That's a neat idea. Give me an RPG that I play by driving my car (not as a distraction, but as a part of the experience).

    GMaster7 on
    PSN: SKI2000G | Steam: GMaster7 | Battle.net: GMaster7#1842
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