Options

Buying a new electric car

RichyRichy Registered User regular
Hi everyone!

I'm planning on buying a new electric car in the coming weeks. I've narrowed my options to:
1. Nissan Leaf Plus SV
2. Kia Niro Touring
3. Chevrolet Bolt Limited
4. Hyundai Kona Preferred
All brand-new 2020 models from the dealership.

So, first question, for people here who owned one (or several) of these cars, what has your experience been like? Would you recommend?

My second question is regarding the Nissan Leaf specifically because that's the one I'm leaning more towards right now but I'm still hesitant. I'm leaning towards it because I really enjoyed the e-pedal driving mode and I couldn't get a similar experience with the Chevrolet or Hyunday (I couldn't test-drive the Kia). But I'm hesitant because it air-cools its battery instead of liquid-cooling it, and I've heard a lot of negatives about that. So, Nissan Leaf owners, is the e-pedal driving worth it? Have you had problems with your battery over-heating?

Thanks everyone!

sig.gif

Posts

  • Options
    LaOsLaOs SaskatoonRegistered User regular
    I thought the Leaf also had some sort of issue with how they decided to keep the batteries warm during the winter compared to other brands, which may be a problem for your Canadian winters... although maybe they're not actually that bad where you are. Just something to keep in mind (and that I know others on here can speak to).

  • Options
    AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    I mean the battery difference makes itself apparent in the ranges.

    We have an old 2013 leaf we own and are leasing a 2020 bolt. The Kona was probably my first choice but there just weren't any available when we needed to get the second car.

    Overall I think the bolt is a bit cheaper feeling (lol American cars) but hardly enough to complain about.
    The biggest caution I'd have with the leaf is they're (iirc) still using ChaDeMo for the quick charger which is going out of favor, instead of the combo charger.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
  • Options
    SurfpossumSurfpossum A nonentity trying to preserve the anonymity he so richly deserves.Registered User regular
    edited August 2020
    I've had a 2019 Bolt since last April and I love it. It's got about 11,000 miles on it and I have very few complaints. The only major one is that the headrests seem to have been designed for non-human occupants. The roof rack is another thing, last I checked it used a rather uncommon mount which pretty much meant you had to buy new.

    Based on a brief googling of e-pedal driving, it sounds like it's the "L" gear on the Bolt, which has nothing to do with the traditional gear and instead just applies the brakes as you lift off the accelerator. I basically never switch out of it, it's great.

    I went from a 2001 Outback to the Bolt, so the cargo space is substantially smaller but there is a dang good amount of room in there.

    My previous "normal" commute was about 50 miles round trip, and if I didn't take any long trips on the weekend I was generally fine just plugging in to a wall outlet overnight; this would get me through the week and then fully charge over the weekend; with a Level 2 charger I'm pretty sure it would charge up overnight to full. I have the fast charger option installed, so when we go to a big city that has a Level 3 charger it can generally charge like 70% of the entire battery in 30 minutes. It's generally about 200 miles [e: this is a bit of a conservative minimum, it's usually more like 240] on a full charge, and you lose about 20% if you have the AC going. If you are regularly driving more than 50 miles a day I would recommend a Level 2 charger, and if you're frequently taking 100+ mile trips I would make sure you get whatever port lets you use Level 3 chargers (I'm too lazy to convert these to km).

    I thought I would miss stuff about traditional cars but I totally don't, this thing has been a joy.

    Surfpossum on
  • Options
    FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD interior crocodile alligator ⇔ ǝɹʇɐǝɥʇ ǝᴉʌoɯ ʇǝloɹʌǝɥɔ ɐ ǝʌᴉɹp ᴉRegistered User regular
    Have you owned an EV before? Are you interested in EV experiences that don't involve those models?

    Because I drive a BMW i3 and I love it.

    every person who doesn't like an acquired taste always seems to think everyone who likes it is faking it. it should be an official fallacy.

    the "no true scotch man" fallacy.
  • Options
    RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Feral wrote: »
    Have you owned an EV before? Are you interested in EV experiences that don't involve those models?

    Because I drive a BMW i3 and I love it.

    I have not owned an electric car before. While I'm not closed to other models, the i3 specifically doesn't have much cargo space (260L from what I see online, compared to 600+L with the models I've listed). And space is a major issue when you have kids (and folding down the back seats is not an option).

    sig.gif
  • Options
    mRahmanimRahmani DetroitRegistered User regular
    The Bolt has a one-pedal driving mode when shifted to L, which really should have been labelled better. It also has a paddle on the left side of the steering wheel to manually engage the regenerative braking in any mode.

    I'm not familiar with the Kia/Hyundai, only the Chevy. Has the Leaf added a battery heating/cooling system? I'm not super familiar with it but I remember that was an issue with the early models and degraded battery life.

  • Options
    38thDoe38thDoe lets never be stupid again wait lets always be stupid foreverRegistered User regular
    We bought a bolt in 2019 as well. We were initially looking at the leaf but consumer reports heavily favored the Bolt. We have loved it so far.

    I had no idea what that paddle or L did so I'm glad this thread exists.

    38thDoE on steam
    🦀🦑🦀🦑🦀🦑🦀🦑🦀🦑🦀🦑🦀
    
  • Options
    DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    I've got a 2013 Leaf. It predates the e pedal, but it has a "B" driving mode that seems to mimic it, in that it starts breaking as soon as I lift off the gas pedal, though the breaking is generally not aggressive enough to fully allow one pedal driving. It is nice, and I imagine the e pedal should be a better version of that.

    I haven't had any problems with the battery overheating at all. Range definitely takes a beating on the coldest winter days, though that is shared across any EV to some degree. And with the increased range of the newer models I personally wouldn't have an issue with that. The 2013 advertised range is only like 75-80 miles, so when it's <0 degrees Fahrenheit and that range is more like 40 it's annoying.

  • Options
    Donovan PuppyfuckerDonovan Puppyfucker A dagger in the dark is worth a thousand swords in the morningRegistered User regular
    Here in Australia the Leafs are fucking lemons, the batteries die within a few years. Are the US-spec models any better?

  • Options
    tinwhiskerstinwhiskers Registered User regular
    Is there a reason you aren't looking at a Tesla? The standard model 3, has more range than the leaf and is actually a bit cheaper. Also the super charger network is really nice, especially in winter.

    6ylyzxlir2dz.png
  • Options
    RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited August 2020
    Is there a reason you aren't looking at a Tesla? The standard model 3, has more range than the leaf and is actually a bit cheaper. Also the super charger network is really nice, especially in winter.

    Trunk space, first of all. Having children, I need something that can take a folded-up stroller with room to spare. The Model 3 has 400L of trunk space, well below the 550L to 660L of the other models on my list.

    And second, the standard model 3 wouldn't be what we'd be getting. If we go in that direction we'd want all the bells and whistles that make the Model 3 a fun and unique driving experience, and so the price would also be well above the others on the list.

    Richy on
    sig.gif
  • Options
    DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    Here in Australia the Leafs are fucking lemons, the batteries die within a few years. Are the US-spec models any better?

    Well, I'm only N=1, but my 2013 is doing fine. Battery meter in the car still at full, no problems detected with the annual battery checkup at the Nissan dealer, and no problems with decreasing range or anything that I've noticed.

  • Options
    KetarKetar Come on upstairs we're having a partyRegistered User regular
    Richy wrote: »
    Is there a reason you aren't looking at a Tesla? The standard model 3, has more range than the leaf and is actually a bit cheaper. Also the super charger network is really nice, especially in winter.

    Trunk space, first of all. Having children, I need something that can take a folded-up stroller with room to spare. The Model 3 has 400L of trunk space, well below the 550L to 660L of the other models on my list.

    And second, the standard model 3 wouldn't be what we'd be getting. If we go in that direction we'd want all the bells and whistles that make the Model 3 a fun and unique driving experience, and so the price would also be well above the others on the list.

    My 2012 Sonata Hybrid has about 300L of trunk space and we never had a problem fitting in 2 folded-up strollers with plenty of room to spare for other things. 400L is already going to be more than enough for the vast majority of usage. And the standard Model 3 is already going to be way more fun to drive than the options you listed, no need to add any bells and whistles.

    That said, I've been considering a Kona as a replacement for that Sonata Hybrid some time in the next year or two. I had an Elantra before this, and have had nothing but good experiences with Hyundai and the reviews for the Kona have been really good from what I've seen.

  • Options
    Phoenix-DPhoenix-D Registered User regular
    I have a Kona PHEV, which has done great since I bought it. Fits mom's wheelchair in the back easily, EV range is dead on what was advertised, fairly comfortable.

    Note that you don't want to get the top end if you get the Kia- it comes with extremely bright headlights that are blinding to other road users.

  • Options
    furlionfurlion Riskbreaker Lea MondeRegistered User regular
    Not sure what those cars actually cost but BMW makes 2 different PHEV models. The X3 and the X5. The 5 is much more expensive but also much larger. Couldn't tell you the specifics on either car as I just build them. Thought I would mention them though since they are both large enough for a family with stroller with room left over.

    sig.gif Gamertag: KL Retribution
    PSN:Furlion
  • Options
    BouwsTBouwsT Wanna come to a super soft birthday party? Registered User regular
    Our employee drives a Hyundai Ioniq full EV, and he loves it. No reliability concerns (2018), and good range in summer. He does have standard, non EV winter tires however, and in the winter will lose upwards of 30% of his range due to the cold and the comparatively high rolling resistance... I think he said the tires alone accounted for ~10% drop in range.

    Between you and me, Peggy, I smoked this Juul and it did UNTHINKABLE things to my mind and body...
  • Options
    mRahmanimRahmani DetroitRegistered User regular
    Tires make a shocking difference; replacing the high-efficiency tires on the Cruze with a set of Continental DWS dropped my highway economy average from 42 to 38mpg. The Continentals ride and handle vastly better in both dry and wet, but the fuel economy hit sucks.

  • Options
    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    Can't speak to the 2020 versions, but I can compare:
    2. Kia Niro Touring
    4. Hyundai Kona Preferred

    for the 2019 versions.

    The Niro EV and the Kona EV are basically the same car, with two differences: the Niro's got better leg room in the back, the Kona has slightly better battery life. We got the Niro because we'll frequently be the one driving folks to lunch (hence adults in the back seat), and it's amazing how much of a difference that little bit makes. Not sure how much difference it'd make with kids/how things work with carseats, but something to think about.

    Also maybe look into leasing instead of buying - it's a common thing with EVs because of how battery progress is going, etc, etc.

    Also also, look into tax breaks with your local electrical company, as an FYI. We got a free level 2 charger (had to pay for it to be installed, but still), and get a discounted electricity rate between midnight and 6am.

  • Options
    RichyRichy Registered User regular
    Jragghen wrote: »
    Also maybe look into leasing instead of buying - it's a common thing with EVs because of how battery progress is going, etc, etc.

    Also also, look into tax breaks with your local electrical company, as an FYI. We got a free level 2 charger (had to pay for it to be installed, but still), and get a discounted electricity rate between midnight and 6am.

    I'm in Québec, so the combined Federal and Provincial tax breaks for buying a new EV is $13,000. Which is great. But also really hurt the used EV market, and made dealers pretty much uninterested in leasing EVs.

    sig.gif
  • Options
    JragghenJragghen Registered User regular
    Oh, if you're in Quebec, look into battery HEATING more than the cooling.

    Winter range takes a big hit in cold weather. Like in Canada, you might see 1/3-1/2 the range cut off without good heating.

  • Options
    mRahmanimRahmani DetroitRegistered User regular
    edited August 2020
    Edit: The Leaf does have a battery heater, though it seems like it only activates when the car isn’t charging? And there’s no active cooling like the other EVs.

    mRahmani on
  • Options
    BlazeFireBlazeFire Registered User regular
    mRahmani wrote: »
    Edit: The Leaf does have a battery heater, though it seems like it only activates when the car isn’t charging? And there’s no active cooling like the other EVs.

    Maybe the idea is the batteries generate their own heat when charging.

  • Options
    RichyRichy Registered User regular
    BlazeFire wrote: »
    mRahmani wrote: »
    Edit: The Leaf does have a battery heater, though it seems like it only activates when the car isn’t charging? And there’s no active cooling like the other EVs.

    Maybe the idea is the batteries generate their own heat when charging.

    I asked the dealer about it. When driving, the battery receives recirculated hot air from the cabin. Since the new Leaf has battery cells spread farther apart, the air circulates between them and heats the battery. They do recommend that we warm up the car a few minutes before driving off. So it's nice that the car's phone app allows remote starting.

    sig.gif
  • Options
    DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    I have a 2020 Niro EV. It's fine. We bought it primarily for my wife to drive, planning on using it to commute (we normally carpool), but we've been working from home since February. Womp.

    Range is as advertised.

    The 2020 model backup beep is loud as hell, though. There were complaints that the 2019 one was barely audible, and they over-corrected.

    I'm super tall (6'6") and the seat doesn't lower far enough to give me a comfortable view of the road, especially under the rear view mirror. My car is a 2003 Subaru Forester (I don't care much about nice cars since my Audi debacle in the mid 2000s), and honestly it's a lot more comfortable for me to drive than the Niro. Plus my car has more trunk capacity. I'd summarize it as "it's definitely more of a station wagon than an SUV."

    If you asked her, she'd say she's very happy with it. I'm meh, but I'm also not the one we had in mind while car shopping. When I replace my car, I'm going to look at something more on the SUV side of things, or at least something tailored to my height.

Sign In or Register to comment.