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Penny Arcade - Comic - Father Of The Year

DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
edited January 2021 in The Penny Arcade Hub
imagePenny Arcade - Comic - Father Of The Year

Videogaming-related online strip by Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins. Includes news and commentary.

Read the full story here

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    BropocalypseBropocalypse Registered User regular
    Global Pandemic? That's old news! Nobody cares about that anymore! Let's get video games back on the grill.

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    FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    Is this actually based on reality?

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
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    MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited January 2021
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    FiendishrabbitFiendishrabbit Registered User regular
    I have to say their caricature of the dad is extremely accurate.

    "The western world sips from a poisonous cocktail: Polarisation, populism, protectionism and post-truth"
    -Antje Jackelén, Archbishop of the Church of Sweden
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    MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited January 2021
    Gabe does have a lot of experience drawing bell ends.

    MichaelLC on
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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    "Kids are addicted to video games! They wouldn't know what to do if they didn't have them!"
    -someone who had a meltdown over not being able to go to bars or high school football games

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    And if he'd spent 40 hours a week watching sports, reading about sports, talking about sports with his friends, making sports statistics spreadsheets and said "sports are my whole life"? Well, then he's just plain normal.

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    LttlefootLttlefoot Registered User regular
    PA has been covering “parents and media dislike video games” for 20 years now. Maybe in another 10 they won’t need to anymore

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    V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Lttlefoot wrote: »
    PA has been covering “parents and media dislike video games” for 20 years now. Maybe in another 10 they won’t need to anymore

    There's a class of person who is absolutely attacked by the idea that someone likes other stuff than them. And if that other person is someone they think owes them parental "respect", oh boy...

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    LucascraftLucascraft Registered User regular
    Yeah, I feel like snobbishness about one's hobbies have not caught up to 2021 yet. The hypocrisy is kind of astounding. People will look down their noses at gamers, while investing countless hours in imaginary fantasy sports.

    It's 2021. I'm a man. But I have no f'n clue how to change the oil in my car. But you know what? It doesn't f'n matter cause I can pay someone to do it for me. I don't need to personally know that skill, because someone else does. So don't judge me. Don't judge me because I enjoy video games and you enjoy playing with spreadsheets and imaginary sports numbers.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    I'm not much of a fan of the usual "just post a quote from the thing you're commenting on", but I feel like I have to. There were so many amazing ones in the newspost, but this was the one that I really felt the most:
    One of the things you'll learn is that you don't know your children very well. These are the people who are going to bury you. Make an effort.

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    CambiataCambiata Commander Shepard The likes of which even GAWD has never seenRegistered User regular
    Lucascraft wrote: »
    Yeah, I feel like snobbishness about one's hobbies have not caught up to 2021 yet. The hypocrisy is kind of astounding. People will look down their noses at gamers, while investing countless hours in imaginary fantasy sports.

    It's 2021. I'm a man. But I have no f'n clue how to change the oil in my car. But you know what? It doesn't f'n matter cause I can pay someone to do it for me. I don't need to personally know that skill, because someone else does. So don't judge me. Don't judge me because I enjoy video games and you enjoy playing with spreadsheets and imaginary sports numbers.

    I'm a woman. I DO know how to change the oil in my car. But it's a fucking annoying job and I also pay someone to do it for me.

    The NY Times article is so tone deaf it sounds like it came from another decade (specifically the 90s). I was particularly amused about them considering what other hobby junior might get into, like knitting. Because knitting and a lot of other DIY hobbies can be learned on Youtube. But we can't have that since screen time is evil. I guess junior should just stare at the walls instead of getting any sort of enrichment in his life because SCREEN TIME. Ugh.

    Peace to fashion police, I wear my heart
    On my sleeve, let the runway start
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    Moridin889Moridin889 Registered User regular
    A+ Newspost. Full of good stuff

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    alex473xalex473x Registered User new member
    People still play Halo?

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    RingoRingo He/Him a distinct lack of substanceRegistered User regular
    You can't just fail your children the way your dad failed you and call it a day.

    Oh, Tycho, did you already forget that 40% of American adults demand the right to do that very thing? Adults who will resist change even if it kills themselves and half a million of their neighbors? Of course you *shouldn't* fail your kids by making the same mistakes your parents did, but you absolutely *can* and a portion of the country will do it with zeal.

    This is the course of history when people ascribe to a philosophy of "change is bad"

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
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    KoopahTroopahKoopahTroopah The koopas, the troopas. Philadelphia, PARegistered User regular
    News post is aces. Bravo, Tycho!

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    MarcinMNMarcinMN Registered User regular
    edited January 2021
    I guess they need to fall back on older doom-and-gloom topics now that Trump is out of office. Perhaps next we can resurrect the one about D&D being satanic.

    I didn't need this new information to lose respect for the NYT though. That happened a long time ago. :)

    EDIT: Ah, I see the newspost even mentions D&D. Ha. I swear I didn't know that when I wrote that comment.

    MarcinMN on
    "It's just as I've always said. We are being digested by an amoral universe."

    -Tycho Brahe
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    CuriousPencilCuriousPencil Registered User regular
    Floored by the majesty of Jerry's newspost; his use of language is so often a log fire to an alphabetless winter. Wish I could find the post where he talked about his first-born's arrival, that had a punch like this one, a primal paternal protective gutpunch of beauty. This feels like an arc from there. It's so rewarding as a consumer-of-this when talent-like-that gets riled enough to write so sharply and passionately. Bravo sir!

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    il biggoil biggo Registered User regular
    "Parenting should involve a licensing process". Will I look bad if I say this has been my view on the world for a few decades now?
    It's amazing how some humans manage to actually *evolve* in a photocopier-style educational environment, where you receive the instructions to the world from someone who didn't pay attention when they were explained to them.

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    InTheTrenchesInTheTrenches Registered User regular
    I'm just wandering what the parents are doing at the same time. Watching tv?

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    DjiemDjiem Registered User regular
    I'm just wandering what the parents are doing at the same time. Watching tv?

    They can't; junior is using it to play videogames. Why do you think the parents are upset?

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    InTheTrenchesInTheTrenches Registered User regular
    You might have a point there. If parents cant watch tv, they need to do something else. And that's is to complaint about children playing video games. So bring out the board games. :)

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    TheSchaefTheSchaef Registered User regular
    edited January 2021
    Ringo wrote: »
    Oh, Tycho, did you already forget that 40% of American adults demand the right to do that very thing? Adults who will resist change even if it kills themselves and half a million of their neighbors?

    Half the shops in the small town where I live are still shuttered nearly a year later. Many of them will never open again. I think it does them a great disservice to be told they are "not essential", made to sit at home and watch the businesses their parents and grandparents built collapse in front of them, while our town starts to wither despite that whopping $600 we all got (and nowhere to spend it), and to be told now that they just "don't like change".

    Especially now that administrations have changed and suddenly everyone's all gung-ho about getting the country opened up and suddenly studies are coming out saying oh, the lockdowns didn't really help that much.

    While turnover is fresh in my mind:
    il biggo wrote: »
    "Parenting should involve a licensing process". Will I look bad if I say this has been my view on the world for a few decades now?

    The last guy to sit in the big chair made a number of actions currently empowered to the executive branch, and half the country lost their minds over it, sometimes just because he's the one who did it. A new guy sits in the chair, and the first thing he does is sign a bunch more orders for the sake of un-ordering what was previously ordered. In more than a few cases, they're long-standing policy orders that have been flipped on and off like a light switch depending on whose turn it is in the chair.

    All of this to say, I think the last group of people that should have a say in determining parental competence is a regulatory body. People already get Children's Services weaponized against them as it is. I don't relish the day when whether we can or cannot have a family is managed by a body whose orders are going to change every four years and who are showing more than a little penchant for political reprisals.

    TheSchaef on
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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Cambiata wrote: »
    But we can't have that since screen time is evil. I guess junior should just stare at the walls instead of getting any sort of enrichment in his life because SCREEN TIME. Ugh.

    My 9 y.o. son has ADHD and is on the spectrum (which always sounds like a wireless technology to me). So we've grappled with how much we should let him sit in front of a screen. There are very real repercussions for him with activities that are mostly sedentary. But... what are you going to do? His favorite hobbies are coding in Scratch/python/Lego Boost, legos, building circuits (soldering chips mostly now, though he use to wire stuff up a lot with breadboards before), and playing video games with me and his little sister.

    I don't want to say "sorry, son, but that's too much programming for the day." As a programmer myself, I know that he's getting a big head start on his skillset. He wants to go play outside about as much as *I* did as a kid (hint: not much). Plus we're in Minnesota so it's a frozen hellscape for at least another couple of months. And he loves playing games with me (we're having a blast with Luigi's mansion) and his sister. In fact, given some of his spectrum-related triggers, it's one of the ways he can interact with his sister the best.

    That doesn't mean we have no limits. He can't sit on the couch playing video games for an hour. But we try to rotate activities so at least he has to move from one side of the room to the other. That's good parenting, right?
    Djiem wrote: »
    I'm just wandering what the parents are doing at the same time. Watching tv?

    They can't; junior is using it to play videogames. Why do you think the parents are upset?

    As funny as that may be, I'm pretty sure we're in a screen-rich environment these days. Plus a big part of what they were complaining about was using his phone all the time.

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    syclicksyclick Registered User new member
    As a parent of a child on the spectrum, I can echo the sentiment of dealing with "experts" when dealing with my son's autism. Doctors, family... even fellow autism parents who felt they'd figured it all out... they all threw their convictions (and sometimes judgements) our way. But the most progress we've seen came when we decided to focus on our happiness as a family. Suddenly my son's socialization and spontaneous speech took off.

    Sure we still do stuff like ABA and speech/occupational therapy, but going with our gut was probably the best decision we've made so far.

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    SatsumomoSatsumomo Rated PG! Registered User regular
    I just watched "The Social Dilemma" last night, and well I think you need to limit specific types of screen time. It's very different letting your child endlessly scroll Instagram vs. learning Python.

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    Mac_RMac_R Registered User new member
    I disagree with Jerry, in this particular issue. I think it's tone-deaf to see people worrying about how the pandemic is changing people's behavior (kids and adults) and just act like it's Jack Thompson rising from his grave to whine about murder simulators.

    I know I don't have much right to talk, since I don't have any kids, but the way I see it, not worrying that something they're overindulging it might have negative consequences counts more as "failing as a parent" than just ignoring it.

    It's a complicated discussion because some people say it's just a rehash of the old paranoia, and in some aspects it might be, but I think circunstances, right now, are a bit extreme.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Satsumomo wrote: »
    I just watched "The Social Dilemma" last night, and well I think you need to limit specific types of screen time. It's very different letting your child endlessly scroll Instagram vs. learning Python.

    As a parent who has started having to worry about this, I've found the tools for limiting this kind of thing on a granular level to be kind of crap. And I say that as someone with a solid chunk of IT experience. Either they're useless or require a decent chunk of time to set up and administer on an ongoing basis. If anyone has a suggestion of one they actually love that doesn't require dedicating days to it, please feel free to send me a PM.

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    PreacherPreacher Registered User regular
    il biggo wrote: »
    "Parenting should involve a licensing process". Will I look bad if I say this has been my view on the world for a few decades now?
    It's amazing how some humans manage to actually *evolve* in a photocopier-style educational environment, where you receive the instructions to the world from someone who didn't pay attention when they were explained to them.

    This always seems like a good idea until you remember that what you think should be on a parenting license and what Ted Cruz or Noah Hawley does are vastly different things and the government deciding who can have a child is a fucking terrifying thing even with the amount of bad parents in the world.

    I would like some money because these are artisanal nuggets of wisdom philistine.

    pleasepaypreacher.net
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    H3KnucklesH3Knuckles But we decide which is right and which is an illusion.Registered User regular
    edited January 2021
    Satsumomo wrote: »
    I just watched "The Social Dilemma" last night, and well I think you need to limit specific types of screen time. It's very different letting your child endlessly scroll Instagram vs. learning Python.

    That's something Mike and/or Jerry have talked about in the past; this false equivalency that underlies 'screen time' limitations. Not all screen time is created equal. If a kid is doing something productive and learning then why should we limit it, beyond making sure they get a reasonable amount of physical activity each week?

    It would be like setting a limit on book time.

    H3Knuckles on
    If you're curious about my icon; it's an update of the early Lego Castle theme's "Black Falcons" faction.
    camo_sig2-400.png
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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    H3Knuckles wrote: »
    Satsumomo wrote: »
    I just watched "The Social Dilemma" last night, and well I think you need to limit specific types of screen time. It's very different letting your child endlessly scroll Instagram vs. learning Python.

    That's something Mike and/or Jerry have talked about in the past; this false equivalency that underlies 'screen time' limitations. Not all screen time is created equal. If a kid is doing something productive and learning then why should we limit it, beyond making sure they get a reasonable amount of physical activity each week?

    It would be like setting a limit on book time.

    My first thought was "magazine time". Because of those magazines. You know the ones.





    (Yes, I mean the knitting ones.)

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    AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    H3Knuckles wrote: »
    Satsumomo wrote: »
    I just watched "The Social Dilemma" last night, and well I think you need to limit specific types of screen time. It's very different letting your child endlessly scroll Instagram vs. learning Python.

    That's something Mike and/or Jerry have talked about in the past; this false equivalency that underlies 'screen time' limitations. Not all screen time is created equal. If a kid is doing something productive and learning then why should we limit it, beyond making sure they get a reasonable amount of physical activity each week?

    It would be like setting a limit on book time.

    Indeed, Mike held a talk at his kid's school and talked about it here. The idea that some games were more enriching than other games was apparently mind-blowing to some parents. The idea that games are dumb was very prevalent.

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    hurricane567hurricane567 Registered User new member
    "New York Times to Sublease Office Space in Revenue Search"-Bloomberg, 4 years ago. NYT was renting out 8 floors of its own building to keep the lights on in the rest of it. Not enough people were buying its fishwrapper or paying to access their website to make ends meet then. It might be worse now, depending on how much of what they publish is bull chips or news.

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    SolventSolvent Econ-artist กรุงเทพมหานครRegistered User regular
    For what it's worth, I'll also point out that however many cool and different things you can do in front of a screen, there are also opportunity costs here. It's important to the physical development of kids that they do get up and move around. Interacting with the natural world is also pretty important (before someone brings up Wii Sports or whatever is up-to-date there).

    I don't know where he got the scorpions, or how he got them into my mattress.

    http://newnations.bandcamp.com
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    V1mV1m Registered User regular
    Mac_R wrote: »
    I disagree with Jerry, in this particular issue. I think it's tone-deaf to see people worrying about how the pandemic is changing people's behavior (kids and adults) and just act like it's Jack Thompson rising from his grave to whine about murder simulators.

    I know I don't have much right to talk, since I don't have any kids, but the way I see it, not worrying that something they're overindulging it might have negative consequences counts more as "failing as a parent" than just ignoring it.

    It's a complicated discussion because some people say it's just a rehash of the old paranoia, and in some aspects it might be, but I think circunstances, right now, are a bit extreme.

    You know what? After the last 5 years I am absolutely and 100% utterly fucking done with catering to the tender feelings of people who are stupid shit-heads and want to impose their stupid shittiness on others. Tone Deaf? Nope. Tone Don't Give Any More Fucks

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    TofystedethTofystedeth Registered User regular
    dennis wrote: »
    H3Knuckles wrote: »
    Satsumomo wrote: »
    I just watched "The Social Dilemma" last night, and well I think you need to limit specific types of screen time. It's very different letting your child endlessly scroll Instagram vs. learning Python.

    That's something Mike and/or Jerry have talked about in the past; this false equivalency that underlies 'screen time' limitations. Not all screen time is created equal. If a kid is doing something productive and learning then why should we limit it, beyond making sure they get a reasonable amount of physical activity each week?

    It would be like setting a limit on book time.

    My first thought was "magazine time". Because of those magazines. You know the ones.





    (Yes, I mean the knitting ones.)

    Some "won't somebody think of the children " purl clutching going on here.

    steam_sig.png
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    RingoRingo He/Him a distinct lack of substanceRegistered User regular
    TheSchaef wrote: »
    Ringo wrote: »
    Oh, Tycho, did you already forget that 40% of American adults demand the right to do that very thing? Adults who will resist change even if it kills themselves and half a million of their neighbors?

    Half the shops in the small town where I live are still shuttered nearly a year later. Many of them will never open again. I think it does them a great disservice to be told they are "not essential", made to sit at home and watch the businesses their parents and grandparents built collapse in front of them, while our town starts to wither despite that whopping $600 we all got (and nowhere to spend it), and to be told now that they just "don't like change".

    Especially now that administrations have changed and suddenly everyone's all gung-ho about getting the country opened up and suddenly studies are coming out saying oh, the lockdowns didn't really help that much.
    The change I am talking about very much includes the ability to change your thinking on "the economic prosperity of my town/family business" vs 3-4 million dead fellow citizens. That the last administration did nothing to help making the correct choice easier on citizens doesn't change the fact that it was and still is the correct choice. Your right to prosperity ends when it gets other people killed.

    Also, the change of political power has very little to do with the latest talk of "opening up" the country and everything to do with there being a vaccine now. It's almost like you're not paying attention and just have an axe to grind about politics!

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
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    Eat it You Nasty Pig.Eat it You Nasty Pig. tell homeland security 'we are the bomb'Registered User regular
    it's a false choice anyway; letting everything open and the hospital system collapse would also be detrimental to the economy

    hold your head high soldier, it ain't over yet
    that's why we call it the struggle, you're supposed to sweat
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    EddyEddy Gengar the Bittersweet Registered User regular
    edited January 2021
    You're the ones who dragged these kids from non-being into being. The least you could do is make them feel welcome.

    As an anti-natalist, I applaud this closing line. I fucking despise parents who don't fucking care about their fucking kids, who they owe fucking EVERYTHING to for forcing them into this hellish dying world.

    Kids deserve compassion and acceptance, and that so many disgustingly selfish parents will never give them either is something that ignites every negative emotion I have. I wish I could believe that they eventually recognize how much their kids loathe and hate them, and beg for forgiveness, but parents who just mindlessly procreate for no other reason than pure selfishness will never find that level of self-awareness.

    Eddy on
    "and the morning stars I have seen
    and the gengars who are guiding me" -- W.S. Merwin
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    DjiemDjiem Registered User regular
    To those agreeing (in part) with the article to the extent that kids need a balance in life between physical activity and sedentary fun, between real life socializing and gaming:

    Cool story. You might not have noticed, but there's a pandemic out there. Yeah.

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