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Penny Arcade - Comic - Shot Caller, Brawler

DogDog Registered User, Administrator, Vanilla Staff admin
edited April 2021 in The Penny Arcade Hub
imagePenny Arcade - Comic - Shot Caller, Brawler

Videogaming-related online strip by Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins. Includes news and commentary.

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    Anon von ZilchAnon von Zilch Registered User regular
    I'm horny for that vax, but we're still at "vaccinating the olds" over here.

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    AldoAldo Hippo Hooray Registered User regular
    I'm horny for that vax, but we're still at "vaccinating the olds" over here.

    If we wait long enough, we will be the olds and finally receive our vax.

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    RingoRingo He/Him a distinct lack of substanceRegistered User regular
    And suddenly I understand people who fear needles just a bit more

    Huh

    Sterica wrote: »
    I know my last visit to my grandpa on his deathbed was to find out how the whole Nazi werewolf thing turned out.
    Edcrab's Exigency RPG
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    Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The sunny beaches of CanadaRegistered User regular
    Aldo wrote: »
    I'm horny for that vax, but we're still at "vaccinating the olds" over here.

    If we wait long enough, we will be the olds and finally receive our vax.

    We either wait 'til were olds, or just olds enough.

    My parents have been vaccinated (yey) and I will need to look into it soon enough. I'm almost Tycho olds, but not quite yet.

    H9f4bVe.png
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    DjiemDjiem Registered User regular
    As a Canadian, I'm hoping to be old enough in 12 years when I hit 50. By then the vax might have reached that age group.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    I used to be freaked out by needles, but allergy therapy got me over that. It was needles all the way down.

    I got the Pfizer, and I literally didn't even feel that needle go in. I think it must have went in just the right spot to miss any nerves.

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    BremenBremen Registered User regular
    edited April 2021
    Vaccine/injection needles don't bother me at all. Blood draws or donations are deeply unpleasant for me, though.

    Maybe my body is just greedy and doesn't like anyone taking its stuff.

    Bremen on
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    Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Bremen wrote: »
    Vaccine/injection needles don't bother me at all. Blood draws or donations are deeply unpleasant for me, though.

    Maybe my body is just greedy and doesn't like anyone taking its stuff.

    Same. I think I just instinctively have an issue seeing blood leaving my body like that.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
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    MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    Bremen wrote: »
    Vaccine/injection needles don't bother me at all. Blood draws or donations are deeply unpleasant for me, though.

    Maybe my body is just greedy and doesn't like anyone taking its stuff.

    Same. I think I just instinctively have an issue seeing blood leaving my body like that.

    That's why you need to bring your blood cup.
    "Just put it in here when your done."

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    TofystedethTofystedeth Registered User regular
    Yeah I'm okay for the standard amount drawn at my yearly physical. As long as I don't look it filling the vial.

    I gave blood once in college and I was doing fine until they took the sample for testing, when I made the mistake of looking down and seeing it fill the container, at which point I threw up. A lot. Then passed out a couple times.

    steam_sig.png
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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Bremen wrote: »
    Vaccine/injection needles don't bother me at all. Blood draws or donations are deeply unpleasant for me, though.

    Yearly blood draws are what got me over the fear of big needles.

    Watching the blood doesn't bother me as much. I actually find it interesting.

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    LucedesLucedes might be real Registered User regular
    i have the exact problem from the news post and it sucks a lot. it's good to know i'm not the only one, though.

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    PeriSoftPeriSoft Registered User regular
    215171966_YZmR2-L-2.jpg

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Lucedes wrote: »
    i have the exact problem from the news post and it sucks a lot. it's good to know i'm not the only one, though.

    Have you tried a blindfold?

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    zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    Fuck spiders. I know of people who refuse shots at doctors offices. I don't know how to refuse spiders in my bathroom.

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    BropocalypseBropocalypse Registered User regular
    I'm okay with spiders, generally speaking. No reason to be afraid. Then again, I don't live in Australia

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    H3KnucklesH3Knuckles But we decide which is right and which is an illusion.Registered User regular
    edited April 2021
    The thing about spiders is, they won't damage your stuff, but they catch and eat things that could. So I generally don't mind them, though I'll tear down a web if it's in an inconvenient place. When a spider gets somewhere I don't want them, I usually try to use something like an index card of flattened bit of cardboard from the recycling to catch it and relocate it, rather than smooshing them.

    Bugs used to freak me out as a kid, but somewhere along the way I stopped being bothered so much. Now I follow this forums entomology-related threads out of interest in nature. I still find centipedes creepy, but I've learned to just look the other way because they hoover up lots of more troublesome pests.

    Pretty much every adult in my family has gotten a shot, but most of us are still waiting for round two, except my brother who was lucky enough to got the one-dose J&J vaccine. My dad & I got Moderna, and didn't suffer any side effects, but the ones who got Pfizer had some mild sickness for a day or two after. I did have a weird delayed-reaction to the shot where I had a bruise that didn't really show for a few days, then a week after the injection the bicep below that shoulder became really sore & stiff for about a day and a half.

    H3Knuckles on
    If you're curious about my icon; it's an update of the early Lego Castle theme's "Black Falcons" faction.
    camo_sig2-400.png
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    ZomagicZomagic Registered User regular
    edited April 2021
    On the topic of 'vaccinating the olds', man, I just don't get it. I don't get why they're group 1. I mean, I kind of do. I do know that they're more likely to die, and I feel like that's really important, but it also seems to turn a blind eye to the social aspects.

    The majority of these people should be retired. They should be prime candidates for staying at home. They were probably doing a lot of that BEFORE the quarantines started. It's something that the majority probably even PLANNED to do a lot of in this period of their lives. So why are we giving all those vaccines to them, when there are people out there, other high risk people, who do not have retirement funds to allow them to spend time at home? It boggles the mind. There are people who must work to survive, who have to put themselves outside, every day, and come into contact with people, no matter how much they might want to quarantine themselves.

    Stuff sucks for everyone, but I do wonder about the logic of vaccinating people who, as a group, should be the ones who are the most capable of isolating themselves. Front facing workers with high risk factors should have been group 1, not group 2 or 3. The grocery store clerk who stays asymptomatic for a week is more likely to spread covid than grandma sitting at home, doing her knitting. And I hope people can see that I'm not trying to be ageist here, this stuff just doesn't check out from a logical standpoint. Maybe it would make more sense if the old people in question were people in retirement homes, who are in exposed communities where covid has ravaged and killed huge populations. But not just anyone who's elderly. THAT I would get.

    Zomagic on
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    YoungFreyYoungFrey Registered User regular
    Zomagic wrote: »
    On the topic of 'vaccinating the olds', man, I just don't get it. I don't get why they're group 1. I mean, I kind of do. I do know that they're more likely to die, and I feel like that's really important, but it also seems to turn a blind eye to the social aspects.

    The majority of these people should be retired. They should be prime candidates for staying at home. They were probably doing a lot of that BEFORE the quarantines started. It's something that the majority probably even PLANNED to do a lot of in this period of their lives. So why are we giving all those vaccines to them, when there are people out there, other high risk people, who do not have retirement funds to allow them to spend time at home? It boggles the mind. There are people who must work to survive, who have to put themselves outside, every day, and come into contact with people, no matter how much they might want to quarantine themselves.

    Stuff sucks for everyone, but I do wonder about the logic of vaccinating people who, as a group, should be the ones who are the most capable of isolating themselves. Front facing workers with high risk factors should have been group 1, not group 2 or 3. The grocery store clerk who stays asymptomatic for a week is more likely to spread covid than grandma sitting at home, doing her knitting. And I hope people can see that I'm not trying to be ageist here, this stuff just doesn't check out from a logical standpoint. Maybe it would make more sense if the old people in question were people in retirement homes, who are in exposed communities where covid has ravaged and killed huge populations. But not just anyone who's elderly. THAT I would get.

    By prioritizing older people, you drastically reduce Covid-19 deaths.

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    FireballDragonFireballDragon Registered User regular
    PeriSoft wrote: »
    215171966_YZmR2-L-2.jpg

    Though he doesn't seem to have qualms with the giant spider boss from Devil May Cry.

    214616325_r5Wnj-XL-2.jpg

    And as far as people with the power of spiders go...

    215167036_n6KLX-L-2.jpg

    Hmm... Gabe seems to have a long, complicated relationship with spiders.

    Real talk, after getting my first shot, my shoulder felt a little heavy the day after, but only for a few hours. As of now, my second one's due in like, a week. This might be a little tasteless, but after getting my first shot, I joked "Gee, I hope this doesn't make me autistic- Oh, wait!" Full disclosure, I have Asperger's, so it was more of a "It's okay for us to make those jokes" sort of thing, though I don't support shit like using autism as an insult or whatever.

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    RatherDashing89RatherDashing89 Registered User regular
    Zomagic wrote: »
    On the topic of 'vaccinating the olds', man, I just don't get it. I don't get why they're group 1. I mean, I kind of do. I do know that they're more likely to die, and I feel like that's really important, but it also seems to turn a blind eye to the social aspects.

    The majority of these people should be retired. They should be prime candidates for staying at home. They were probably doing a lot of that BEFORE the quarantines started. It's something that the majority probably even PLANNED to do a lot of in this period of their lives. So why are we giving all those vaccines to them, when there are people out there, other high risk people, who do not have retirement funds to allow them to spend time at home? It boggles the mind. There are people who must work to survive, who have to put themselves outside, every day, and come into contact with people, no matter how much they might want to quarantine themselves.

    Stuff sucks for everyone, but I do wonder about the logic of vaccinating people who, as a group, should be the ones who are the most capable of isolating themselves. Front facing workers with high risk factors should have been group 1, not group 2 or 3. The grocery store clerk who stays asymptomatic for a week is more likely to spread covid than grandma sitting at home, doing her knitting. And I hope people can see that I'm not trying to be ageist here, this stuff just doesn't check out from a logical standpoint. Maybe it would make more sense if the old people in question were people in retirement homes, who are in exposed communities where covid has ravaged and killed huge populations. But not just anyone who's elderly. THAT I would get.

    To my understanding, (so apply many grains of salt), ultimately in most cases getting the vaccine is not going to appreciably impact your personal safety. But as a society we need as many people to take it as possibly can so we can eliminate the threat of the virus as a whole. So what really matters for the health of grandma and the grocer is for us all to get it in a timely manner. But the average person cannot be convinced to even mildly inconvenience themselves for a generic good of us all: they need to think it's going to immediately and measurably make their life better. That, I think, is the thinking behind things like vaccine passports: just to provide an incentive to do the right thing even though your block party is probably not any safer because you got the vaccine. The problem is that people feel like they are getting mixed signals because the politicians say "get a vaccine so you can get back to normal" and the health professionals say "get the vaccine but keep your mask and social distance".

    All that to say I don't know that it hugely matters who gets it first, so we give it to the olds on the off chance that some of them are prevented from lethal cases due to having the vaccine.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    Zomagic wrote: »
    On the topic of 'vaccinating the olds', man, I just don't get it. I don't get why they're group 1. I mean, I kind of do. I do know that they're more likely to die, and I feel like that's really important, but it also seems to turn a blind eye to the social aspects.

    The majority of these people should be retired. They should be prime candidates for staying at home. They were probably doing a lot of that BEFORE the quarantines started. It's something that the majority probably even PLANNED to do a lot of in this period of their lives. So why are we giving all those vaccines to them, when there are people out there, other high risk people, who do not have retirement funds to allow them to spend time at home? It boggles the mind. There are people who must work to survive, who have to put themselves outside, every day, and come into contact with people, no matter how much they might want to quarantine themselves.

    Stuff sucks for everyone, but I do wonder about the logic of vaccinating people who, as a group, should be the ones who are the most capable of isolating themselves. Front facing workers with high risk factors should have been group 1, not group 2 or 3. The grocery store clerk who stays asymptomatic for a week is more likely to spread covid than grandma sitting at home, doing her knitting. And I hope people can see that I'm not trying to be ageist here, this stuff just doesn't check out from a logical standpoint. Maybe it would make more sense if the old people in question were people in retirement homes, who are in exposed communities where covid has ravaged and killed huge populations. But not just anyone who's elderly. THAT I would get.

    To my understanding, (so apply many grains of salt), ultimately in most cases getting the vaccine is not going to appreciably impact your personal safety. But as a society we need as many people to take it as possibly can so we can eliminate the threat of the virus as a whole. So what really matters for the health of grandma and the grocer is for us all to get it in a timely manner. But the average person cannot be convinced to even mildly inconvenience themselves for a generic good of us all: they need to think it's going to immediately and measurably make their life better. That, I think, is the thinking behind things like vaccine passports: just to provide an incentive to do the right thing even though your block party is probably not any safer because you got the vaccine. The problem is that people feel like they are getting mixed signals because the politicians say "get a vaccine so you can get back to normal" and the health professionals say "get the vaccine but keep your mask and social distance".

    All that to say I don't know that it hugely matters who gets it first, so we give it to the olds on the off chance that some of them are prevented from lethal cases due to having the vaccine.

    I think it changes over time. At first, you're a loooooong way from herd immunity so you're really mainly protecting the people who would have a really bad case if they got it. Hence the vulnerable getting the first vaccines. After that, you're just trying to get herd immunity so yeah, makes more sense to vax those who mingle more.

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    Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    Zomagic wrote: »
    On the topic of 'vaccinating the olds', man, I just don't get it. I don't get why they're group 1. I mean, I kind of do. I do know that they're more likely to die, and I feel like that's really important, but it also seems to turn a blind eye to the social aspects.

    The majority of these people should be retired. They should be prime candidates for staying at home. They were probably doing a lot of that BEFORE the quarantines started. It's something that the majority probably even PLANNED to do a lot of in this period of their lives. So why are we giving all those vaccines to them, when there are people out there, other high risk people, who do not have retirement funds to allow them to spend time at home? It boggles the mind. There are people who must work to survive, who have to put themselves outside, every day, and come into contact with people, no matter how much they might want to quarantine themselves.

    Stuff sucks for everyone, but I do wonder about the logic of vaccinating people who, as a group, should be the ones who are the most capable of isolating themselves. Front facing workers with high risk factors should have been group 1, not group 2 or 3. The grocery store clerk who stays asymptomatic for a week is more likely to spread covid than grandma sitting at home, doing her knitting. And I hope people can see that I'm not trying to be ageist here, this stuff just doesn't check out from a logical standpoint. Maybe it would make more sense if the old people in question were people in retirement homes, who are in exposed communities where covid has ravaged and killed huge populations. But not just anyone who's elderly. THAT I would get.

    We're now far along enough to see the effects of different vaccination strategies in different areas. Italy went the way of prioritizing public facing workers over the elderly and has had a much higher death toll since the start of their vaccinations than other countries. Government officials have expressed regret at their approach. While prioritizing public facing workers does have a logic behind it, in practice it didn't end up working so well. There are a lot of factors involved as well as even between states in on country the day to day life of the elderly and young can greatly vary but Italy is a big data point on how an approach that doesn't prioritize the elderly can turn out.

    Big Dookie wrote: »
    I found that tilting it doesn't work very well, and once I started jerking it, I got much better results.

    Steam Profile
    3DS: 3454-0268-5595 Battle.net: SteelAngel#1772
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    Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The sunny beaches of CanadaRegistered User regular
    i-68rHN2W.jpg

    H9f4bVe.png
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    Anon von ZilchAnon von Zilch Registered User regular
    Getting my first dose on the 23rd! Looks like being a big ol' tub-o-lard finally came in handy.

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    seanscytheseanscythe Registered User regular
    "On the topic of 'vaccinating the olds', man, I just don't get it. I don't get why they're group 1. I mean, I kind of do. I do know that they're more likely to die, and I feel like that's really important, but it also seems to turn a blind eye to the social aspects.

    The majority of these people should be retired. They should be prime candidates for staying at home. They were probably doing a lot of that BEFORE the quarantines started. It's something that the majority probably even PLANNED to do a lot of in this period of their lives. So why are we giving all those vaccines to them, when there are people out there, other high risk people, who do not have retirement funds to allow them to spend time at home? It boggles the mind. There are people who must work to survive, who have to put themselves outside, every day, and come into contact with people, no matter how much they might want to quarantine themselves.

    Stuff sucks for everyone, but I do wonder about the logic of vaccinating people who, as a group, should be the ones who are the most capable of isolating themselves. Front facing workers with high risk factors should have been group 1, not group 2 or 3. The grocery store clerk who stays asymptomatic for a week is more likely to spread covid than grandma sitting at home, doing her knitting. And I hope people can see that I'm not trying to be ageist here, this stuff just doesn't check out from a logical standpoint. Maybe it would make more sense if the old people in question were people in retirement homes, who are in exposed communities where covid has ravaged and killed huge populations. But not just anyone who's elderly. THAT I would get."

    Because people under 70 have 99.7% chance to recover on their own. As long as they don't have High Blood Pressure, Obesity, or immune deficiency.

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    dennisdennis aka bingley Registered User regular
    seanscythe wrote: »
    ...

    Your quote error had me really questioning my sanity.

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    ConundrumConundrum Registered User regular
    @seanscythe It's not just that they're the high risk group, they're also the REASON so many of us are stuck at home. Without the 60+ group, casualties from Covid would be so small it wouldn't even be an issue. Yes Covid can be very dangerous and can have lasting effects, but they're extremely rare for healthy people. Vaccinating our highest risk people makes them less at risk from the rest of us. Besides vaccine production has ramped up remarkedly, basically anyone can get one now.

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    Eat it You Nasty Pig.Eat it You Nasty Pig. tell homeland security 'we are the bomb'Registered User regular
    I mean a lot of public facing workers were given priority, at least in lots of places in the states. Just, not higher priority than health care workers, people in nursing/assisted living facilities, people with acute medical issues, etc.

    also it's not like retirees are all shut ins, or don't have basically the same need to go out to get food/necessities/medical care/etc that we all do

    it was the smallest on the list but
    Pluto was a planet and I'll never forget
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