As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/

House/Homeowner Thread: 6 months late and 50k over budget

11920212224

Posts

  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    String trimmers usually use the same battery packs as other tools from the same manufacturer, so in addition to picking a company for that, keep in mind you might be able to share batteries with other cordless tools you own/might want to own.

    Also, I've got a Black & Decker trimmer that's fine. I wouldn't, like, anti-recommend it or anything, but the 20V Max 1.5Ah battery it comes with doesn't last long enough to be useful. I'd get halfway through doing along the fence line in my small back yard and it would die. I wound up buying a 3Ah battery and between that and the 1.5 I could actually get through edging and such without having to take a recharge break. Dunno what Ryobi's battery capacity is like or how much trimming you do, but maybe consider that.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    StarZapperMegaMan001
  • GdiguyGdiguy San Diego, CARegistered User regular
    We got an Ego one (along with a lawnmower and hedge trimmer) a month or so ago, and we've been reasonably happy with it

    As noted, biggest thing with those is really battery compatibility with what you currently have / want to have (which is not shocking as the battery costs nearly as much / potentially more than the trimmer does)

    MichaelLCMadpoet
  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    Any recommendations for a battery powered string trimmer?

    Ego Power+ is what I use for lawn equipment.

  • MadpoetMadpoet Registered User regular
    I'll jump on the Ego train. I have the string trimmer, but wish I'd got the pole system with interchangeable heads.

  • shadowaneshadowane Registered User regular
    Madpoet wrote: »
    I'll jump on the Ego train. I have the string trimmer, but wish I'd got the pole system with interchangeable heads.

    I just started looking at trimmers and hedge stuff and saw this. What's the deal with it? Just a pole that you can change heads on vs. having set tools for the task?

    Rich on Beer - I talk about drinking beer. You read about it.
  • jmcdonaldjmcdonald I voted, did you? DC(ish)Registered User regular
    Any recommendations for a battery powered string trimmer?

    i have gone pretty heavy into the greenworks 60v line and have been super impressed with it. currently have the dual battery walk behind mower, string trimmer, leaf blower. hedge clipper, 10" tiller, and snowthrower.

    they've all been tanks, and the fact that i don't have to rebuild carbs every couple years, muck around with oil/gas mixing, keep gas in the garage, etc is just amazing. push button and go.

    it's the future

    OneAngryPossumStarZapper
  • GilgaronGilgaron Registered User regular
    shadowane wrote: »
    Madpoet wrote: »
    I'll jump on the Ego train. I have the string trimmer, but wish I'd got the pole system with interchangeable heads.

    I just started looking at trimmers and hedge stuff and saw this. What's the deal with it? Just a pole that you can change heads on vs. having set tools for the task?

    Yeah it isn't an entirely new idea, you can get gas powered equivalents. Essentially you have a coupling on the shaft that lets you put various different business ends, like a line trimmer, a hedge trimmer, pole saw, etc.

    ElvenshaeBullheadMadpoet
  • shadowaneshadowane Registered User regular
    Gilgaron wrote: »
    shadowane wrote: »
    Madpoet wrote: »
    I'll jump on the Ego train. I have the string trimmer, but wish I'd got the pole system with interchangeable heads.

    I just started looking at trimmers and hedge stuff and saw this. What's the deal with it? Just a pole that you can change heads on vs. having set tools for the task?

    Yeah it isn't an entirely new idea, you can get gas powered equivalents. Essentially you have a coupling on the shaft that lets you put various different business ends, like a line trimmer, a hedge trimmer, pole saw, etc.
    Is it just to save space?

    Rich on Beer - I talk about drinking beer. You read about it.
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    shadowane wrote: »
    Gilgaron wrote: »
    shadowane wrote: »
    Madpoet wrote: »
    I'll jump on the Ego train. I have the string trimmer, but wish I'd got the pole system with interchangeable heads.

    I just started looking at trimmers and hedge stuff and saw this. What's the deal with it? Just a pole that you can change heads on vs. having set tools for the task?

    Yeah it isn't an entirely new idea, you can get gas powered equivalents. Essentially you have a coupling on the shaft that lets you put various different business ends, like a line trimmer, a hedge trimmer, pole saw, etc.
    Is it just to save space?

    The idea is that you don't need to replicate the powerplant portion of the tool, just the working head.

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
    HappylilElfElvenshaeBullheadGilgaronzepherinShadowfireN1tSt4lkerMadpoet
  • BullheadBullhead Registered User regular
    Gilgaron wrote: »
    shadowane wrote: »
    Madpoet wrote: »
    I'll jump on the Ego train. I have the string trimmer, but wish I'd got the pole system with interchangeable heads.

    I just started looking at trimmers and hedge stuff and saw this. What's the deal with it? Just a pole that you can change heads on vs. having set tools for the task?

    Yeah it isn't an entirely new idea, you can get gas powered equivalents. Essentially you have a coupling on the shaft that lets you put various different business ends, like a line trimmer, a hedge trimmer, pole saw, etc.

    Yeah I have a gas-powered trimmer that I have extra edger and pole-saw attachments for. It's great, and cuts down on the amount of equipment in the garage (and saves $$ as hedgie points out, since you don't need to re-buy the engine).

    96058.png?1619393207
    Elvenshae
  • PailryderPailryder Registered User regular
    i have the dewalt which uses the same batteries as my other tools which is nice. changing the string is kind of a pain.

    zepherin
  • OptyOpty Registered User regular
    I went with Ryobi because I needed both a string trimmer and a mulcher and Ryobi was the only option at Home Depot with both at the time (I got a gift card from my parents so I had to buy from there).

  • HappylilElfHappylilElf Registered User regular
    Pailryder wrote: »
    i have the dewalt which uses the same batteries as my other tools which is nice. Changing the string is kind of a pain.

    This is pretty much universal to string trimmers.

    PailryderShadowfireBullheadCptHamiltonThawmusMegaMan001ElvenshaeAbsoluteZerozepherin
  • BullheadBullhead Registered User regular
    Pailryder wrote: »
    i have the dewalt which uses the same batteries as my other tools which is nice. Changing the string is kind of a pain.

    This is pretty much universal to string trimmers.

    Yes. Literally the worst.

    96058.png?1619393207
    ThawmusjmcdonaldPailryderzepherin
  • Trajan45Trajan45 Registered User regular
    Advise on Wet/Dry Vacs. With my old house, I bought way too large of one, it was never full and was a pain to lug around. For our new townhome I'm debating between a traditional plug in vs battery. Watching the same guy who tested the drywall anchors do shop vacs, the Rigids seemed to do well and the larger hose size seems like a plus.

    Plug In: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-Portable-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4070/202077241#overlay

    Battery: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-5-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-ProPack-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Expandable-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4522/100638389

    On one hand, this is a townhome that is mostly done, so the plug in should be fine. No need to worry about batteries and save money. But there is a part of me that after lugging my large old one around likes the idea of not having to find an outlet and drag a cord everywhere. Of course throwing the batteries and charger in adds another $100. My other worry is losing power over time. I just had to replace our dyson's battery after 3 years due to it basically having no charge left.

    Anyone have experience with the battery box vacs? recommendations?

    Origin ID\ Steam ID: Warder45
  • AngelHedgieAngelHedgie Registered User regular
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    Advise on Wet/Dry Vacs. With my old house, I bought way too large of one, it was never full and was a pain to lug around. For our new townhome I'm debating between a traditional plug in vs battery. Watching the same guy who tested the drywall anchors do shop vacs, the Rigids seemed to do well and the larger hose size seems like a plus.

    Plug In: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-Portable-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4070/202077241#overlay

    Battery: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-5-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-ProPack-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Expandable-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4522/100638389

    On one hand, this is a townhome that is mostly done, so the plug in should be fine. No need to worry about batteries and save money. But there is a part of me that after lugging my large old one around likes the idea of not having to find an outlet and drag a cord everywhere. Of course throwing the batteries and charger in adds another $100. My other worry is losing power over time. I just had to replace our dyson's battery after 3 years due to it basically having no charge left.

    Anyone have experience with the battery box vacs? recommendations?

    Check to see if your preferred battery ecosystem makes a wet/dry vac (several do.)

    XBL: Nox Aeternum / PSN: NoxAeternum / NN:NoxAeternum / Steam: noxaeternum
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Pailryder wrote: »
    i have the dewalt which uses the same batteries as my other tools which is nice. Changing the string is kind of a pain.

    This is pretty much universal to string trimmers.

    Yes. Literally the worst.

    Husqvarna figured it out. Press in two tabs to remove the head cover, slide the spool off the spindle, wind 8 feet of line on the spool and snap the ends into two indentations to retain it while you slide the spool back on the spindle, click click the cover and it's done. Completely toolless.

    nibXTE7.png
    ThawmusPailryderzepherin
  • ThawmusThawmus +Jackface Registered User regular
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Pailryder wrote: »
    i have the dewalt which uses the same batteries as my other tools which is nice. Changing the string is kind of a pain.

    This is pretty much universal to string trimmers.

    Yes. Literally the worst.

    Husqvarna figured it out. Press in two tabs to remove the head cover, slide the spool off the spindle, wind 8 feet of line on the spool and snap the ends into two indentations to retain it while you slide the spool back on the spindle, click click the cover and it's done. Completely toolless.

    I can't buy a Husqvarna weed wacker!

    My Husqvarna lawnmower would get suspicious!

    steam_sig.png
    Twitch: Thawmus83
    Youtube: Thawmus
    ElvenshaePailryderzepherinMugsleyShadowfireStarZapper
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    Anybody got experience with metal roofed sheds?

    My house came with a little, ~12x12, corrugated-steel-roof shed. I'd like to either replace the roof or at least make it not leak but I've no experience with these sort of roofs. If I can figure out where it's leaking, do I caulk it/slap some flex seal on it? Or is it "once it leaks, replace it" sort of deal? Also, is it safe to walk on such a roof? The pitch isn't too steep but it seems like pretty thin metal and I have no idea whether the wooden structure beneath is intended to hold up the weight of a human.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    Gilgaron wrote: »
    Any breakers I've interacted with have Off further than Tripped? Or is this something different from the Off, Tripped, and On states I'm used to?

    The arc fault breakers I replaced, at least, had "Off, On, Tripped, and Shrug Emoji". If they were On you'd flip them straight to Off. If they were Off you'd flip straight to On. But once they tripped, just pushing the switch over toward On or Off would move the switch without actually transitioning the breaker into an On or Off state. You'd have to push it toward Off (and it would click over and come to a stop), then push it some more at which point it would actually go to Off.

    I guess technically the weird "Off-Esque" state was really just the end of the play in the mechanism while in Tripped state but it certainly felt like turning it off...and then turning it off some more.

    I was always taught that the breaker reset procedure was to always push it down as far as it would possibly go and then flip it back up

    I write you a story
    But it loses its thread
    Gilgaron
  • Trajan45Trajan45 Registered User regular
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    Advise on Wet/Dry Vacs. With my old house, I bought way too large of one, it was never full and was a pain to lug around. For our new townhome I'm debating between a traditional plug in vs battery. Watching the same guy who tested the drywall anchors do shop vacs, the Rigids seemed to do well and the larger hose size seems like a plus.

    Plug In: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-Portable-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4070/202077241#overlay

    Battery: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-5-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-ProPack-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Expandable-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4522/100638389

    On one hand, this is a townhome that is mostly done, so the plug in should be fine. No need to worry about batteries and save money. But there is a part of me that after lugging my large old one around likes the idea of not having to find an outlet and drag a cord everywhere. Of course throwing the batteries and charger in adds another $100. My other worry is losing power over time. I just had to replace our dyson's battery after 3 years due to it basically having no charge left.

    Anyone have experience with the battery box vacs? recommendations?

    Check to see if your preferred battery ecosystem makes a wet/dry vac (several do.)

    No battery ecosystem so far. The only battery tool I have is my Bosch drill, which is over 10 years old, so I'm not sure the batteries would be interchangeable to current stuff.

    Origin ID\ Steam ID: Warder45
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    JebusUD wrote: »
    Gilgaron wrote: »
    Any breakers I've interacted with have Off further than Tripped? Or is this something different from the Off, Tripped, and On states I'm used to?

    The arc fault breakers I replaced, at least, had "Off, On, Tripped, and Shrug Emoji". If they were On you'd flip them straight to Off. If they were Off you'd flip straight to On. But once they tripped, just pushing the switch over toward On or Off would move the switch without actually transitioning the breaker into an On or Off state. You'd have to push it toward Off (and it would click over and come to a stop), then push it some more at which point it would actually go to Off.

    I guess technically the weird "Off-Esque" state was really just the end of the play in the mechanism while in Tripped state but it certainly felt like turning it off...and then turning it off some more.

    I was always taught that the breaker reset procedure was to always push it down as far as it would possibly go and then flip it back up

    Pretty much. Just every breaker I've ever interacted with, once it tripped you flicked it toward "Off", then back to "On". It's the 'you flick it and it stops but isn't actually off and requires additional force to push into the Off position' behavior that's weird to me. Maybe all the breakers I've previously interacted with were the weird ones!

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    edited May 13
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    Advise on Wet/Dry Vacs. With my old house, I bought way too large of one, it was never full and was a pain to lug around. For our new townhome I'm debating between a traditional plug in vs battery. Watching the same guy who tested the drywall anchors do shop vacs, the Rigids seemed to do well and the larger hose size seems like a plus.

    Plug In: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-Portable-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4070/202077241#overlay

    Battery: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-5-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-ProPack-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Expandable-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4522/100638389

    On one hand, this is a townhome that is mostly done, so the plug in should be fine. No need to worry about batteries and save money. But there is a part of me that after lugging my large old one around likes the idea of not having to find an outlet and drag a cord everywhere. Of course throwing the batteries and charger in adds another $100. My other worry is losing power over time. I just had to replace our dyson's battery after 3 years due to it basically having no charge left.

    Anyone have experience with the battery box vacs? recommendations?

    Check to see if your preferred battery ecosystem makes a wet/dry vac (several do.)

    I have a plug-in Rigid. Power has never been a problem, but I'll say one advantage of battery is it will work if the power is out which is a situation that's likely to need a vacuum.

    I got the car kit that came with a much better flexible orange hose. Recommend that if you go with a Rigid.

    Edit: this one: RIDGID 6 Gal. 3.5-Peak HP NXT Wet/Dry Shop Vacuum with Filter, Hose and Accessories.

    MichaelLC on
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    Anybody got experience with metal roofed sheds?

    My house came with a little, ~12x12, corrugated-steel-roof shed. I'd like to either replace the roof or at least make it not leak but I've no experience with these sort of roofs. If I can figure out where it's leaking, do I caulk it/slap some flex seal on it? Or is it "once it leaks, replace it" sort of deal? Also, is it safe to walk on such a roof? The pitch isn't too steep but it seems like pretty thin metal and I have no idea whether the wooden structure beneath is intended to hold up the weight of a human.

    If it's the type where it's affixed to the roof by screwing through the metal, the rubber washer on those screws only last about ten years. You can replace them, or just cover the heads with sealant. If it's the screwless type where the sheets hook together on the sides, you can always try running a bead of sealant down that seam. You can walk on metal fine, but stay in the flats, not on the ridges, as much as possible. But be careful because even a small amount of dirt or dust on the roof, or the soles of your shoes, make it incredibly slick.

    nibXTE7.png
    CptHamilton
  • N1tSt4lkerN1tSt4lker Registered User regular
    I have a Ryobi and really like it.
    Trajan45 wrote: »
    Advise on Wet/Dry Vacs. With my old house, I bought way too large of one, it was never full and was a pain to lug around. For our new townhome I'm debating between a traditional plug in vs battery. Watching the same guy who tested the drywall anchors do shop vacs, the Rigids seemed to do well and the larger hose size seems like a plus.

    Plug In: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-Portable-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4070/202077241#overlay

    Battery: https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-4-5-Gallon-5-0-Peak-HP-ProPack-Wet-Dry-Shop-Vacuum-with-Fine-Dust-Filter-Expandable-Hose-and-Accessories-WD4522/100638389

    On one hand, this is a townhome that is mostly done, so the plug in should be fine. No need to worry about batteries and save money. But there is a part of me that after lugging my large old one around likes the idea of not having to find an outlet and drag a cord everywhere. Of course throwing the batteries and charger in adds another $100. My other worry is losing power over time. I just had to replace our dyson's battery after 3 years due to it basically having no charge left.

    Anyone have experience with the battery box vacs? recommendations?

    Um. I don't have any insight. Mine is the Harbor Freight version which is...fine.
    I just need to say: I did not realize they made these compact wet/dry vacs that aren't giant canisters on wheels. What are these cute, portable majobbers? Why did no one tell me they existed and there's more than one for my battery ecosystem?

    MichaelLC
  • MegaMan001MegaMan001 CRNA Rochester, MNRegistered User regular
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Pailryder wrote: »
    i have the dewalt which uses the same batteries as my other tools which is nice. Changing the string is kind of a pain.

    This is pretty much universal to string trimmers.

    Yes. Literally the worst.

    Husqvarna figured it out. Press in two tabs to remove the head cover, slide the spool off the spindle, wind 8 feet of line on the spool and snap the ends into two indentations to retain it while you slide the spool back on the spindle, click click the cover and it's done. Completely toolless.

    My Stihl trimmer has the same setup and I think your minimizing how hard it is to push in the tabs.

    I also seem to wind the string too tight which gets pulled very tightly and refuses to release more line.

    I am in the business of saving lives.
  • SiliconStewSiliconStew Registered User regular
    Having a small wet/dry vac is handy at times, and for an apartment or rental where you aren't doing any renovation or shop work it's fine. But in my opinion, the lack of suction power compared to a full size shop vac makes it far less useful for cleaning up actual shop or construction debris and dust. And a battery powered one is unsuited for long periods of use such as dust collection from a sanding block while sanding drywall or various woodworking tools.

    Just remember that half the people you meet are below average intelligence.
    Trajan45
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Pailryder wrote: »
    i have the dewalt which uses the same batteries as my other tools which is nice. Changing the string is kind of a pain.

    This is pretty much universal to string trimmers.

    Yes. Literally the worst.

    Husqvarna figured it out. Press in two tabs to remove the head cover, slide the spool off the spindle, wind 8 feet of line on the spool and snap the ends into two indentations to retain it while you slide the spool back on the spindle, click click the cover and it's done. Completely toolless.

    My Stihl trimmer has the same setup and I think your minimizing how hard it is to push in the tabs.

    I also seem to wind the string too tight which gets pulled very tightly and refuses to release more line.

    I don't have experience with the Stihl one, but I can one handed thumb and middle finger the tabs on my Husqvarna.

    nibXTE7.png
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    MegaMan001 wrote: »
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Pailryder wrote: »
    i have the dewalt which uses the same batteries as my other tools which is nice. Changing the string is kind of a pain.

    This is pretty much universal to string trimmers.

    Yes. Literally the worst.

    Husqvarna figured it out. Press in two tabs to remove the head cover, slide the spool off the spindle, wind 8 feet of line on the spool and snap the ends into two indentations to retain it while you slide the spool back on the spindle, click click the cover and it's done. Completely toolless.

    My Stihl trimmer has the same setup and I think your minimizing how hard it is to push in the tabs.

    I also seem to wind the string too tight which gets pulled very tightly and refuses to release more line.

    I don't have experience with the Stihl one, but I can one handed thumb and middle finger the tabs on my Husqvarna.

    I don't have Stihl or Husqvarna but my Black & Decker also has two squeeze tabs which I can also one-hand squeeze. The biggest issue with it is that, rather than winding line onto a permanent spool, you just load a whole, disposable spool onto the spindle. Which seems great, except that the spools are wound very tight and, combined with spending a year or two in a garage since they come in a 3-pack and I don't use that much line, the line gets stuck to itself and won't unspool, so every few feet I have to take the spool out, yank some more line off, wind it back up, and stick it back in.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    PailryderAbsoluteZero
  • StraygatsbyStraygatsby Registered User regular
    It warms my tough guy heart to read that the stupid weed whacker string is kind of universally reviled. It always makes me feel incredibly deficient in the landed gentry arts when I have to change one out and can never get it work exactly right. I inevitably let it out too far and end up whacking my ankle painfully, only getting it back to the right size by running it up against a sprinkler head or something else hard (and maybe breaking that while we're accruing dummy points).

    PailryderAbsoluteZerozepherinBullheadAim
  • MichaelLCMichaelLC In what furnace was thy brain? ChicagoRegistered User regular
    The Worx 20v model I have is great for loading string, it's just underpowered.

    Simpsonia
  • CptHamiltonCptHamilton Registered User regular
    It warms my tough guy heart to read that the stupid weed whacker string is kind of universally reviled. It always makes me feel incredibly deficient in the landed gentry arts when I have to change one out and can never get it work exactly right. I inevitably let it out too far and end up whacking my ankle painfully, only getting it back to the right size by running it up against a sprinkler head or something else hard (and maybe breaking that while we're accruing dummy points).

    Does your whacker not have a guard on it? I avoid the ankle whacking by keeping the guard between me and it while it cuts off the excess string.

    PSN,Steam,Live | CptHamiltonian
    PailryderElvenshaeStarZapper
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    I have a Ryobi one and there's just a big knob on the bottom. You put it in the correct position, thread the string through so it's dangling out half and half, then turn the knob a bunch to wind it onto the spool.

    Seems like a pretty good system though the threading part can take a few tries to get it out the far hole.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
    Opty
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    What do we like better for Ryobi? The 18v line or the 40v line?

    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • jmcdonaldjmcdonald I voted, did you? DC(ish)Registered User regular
    What do we like better for Ryobi? The 18v line or the 40v line?

    18v let’s you merge with their regular power tool line, which gets a lot of online hate but is perfectly cromulent for the average homeowner/DIYer

    AbsoluteZero
  • MugsleyMugsley Registered User regular
    edited May 13
    The Milwaukee and DeWalt vacs are reviewed well. I have a super small DeWalt vac that works well but the filter hates drywall dust. I want to get a 3-5 gal one but I'm waiting on a sale. I *think* there's a Milwaukee vac that connects to their Packout system, if that matters.

    Mugsley on
  • AiouaAioua Ora Occidens Ora OptimaRegistered User regular
    jmcdonald wrote: »
    What do we like better for Ryobi? The 18v line or the 40v line?

    18v let’s you merge with their regular power tool line, which gets a lot of online hate but is perfectly cromulent for the average homeowner/DIYer

    I have both, 40 for yard tools, but that's because i have a mower.

    If you're not using a mower the 18 might be fine.

    life's a game that you're bound to lose / like using a hammer to pound in screws
    fuck up once and you break your thumb / if you're happy at all then you're god damn dumb
    that's right we're on a fucked up cruise / God is dead but at least we have booze
    bad things happen, no one knows why / the sun burns out and everyone dies
    zepherinjmcdonaldAbsoluteZero
  • TomantaTomanta Registered User regular
    edited May 13
    I have the 40v Ryobi and like it. String is easy to change. But I also have a mower and wanted a second battery; I probably would have gone 18v otherwise.

    I also have an 18v leaf blower and it doesn't last very long so maybe 40 is better.

    Tomanta on
    zepherinAbsoluteZero
  • zepherinzepherin Russian warship, go fuck yourself Registered User regular
    Tomanta wrote: »
    I have the 40v Ryobi and like it. String is easy to change. But I also have a mower and wanted a second battery; I probably would have gone 18v otherwise.

    I also have an 18v leaf blower and it doesn't last very long so maybe 40 is better.

    7dko2l3m5a7p.jpeg

    ShadowfirePailryderMichaelLCMugsleyThawmus
  • BullheadBullhead Registered User regular
    Bullhead wrote: »
    Pailryder wrote: »
    i have the dewalt which uses the same batteries as my other tools which is nice. Changing the string is kind of a pain.

    This is pretty much universal to string trimmers.

    Yes. Literally the worst.

    Husqvarna figured it out. Press in two tabs to remove the head cover, slide the spool off the spindle, wind 8 feet of line on the spool and snap the ends into two indentations to retain it while you slide the spool back on the spindle, click click the cover and it's done. Completely toolless.

    My Toro one is similar - it's the winding of the line part I despise. It's just a pita to wind it tight enough on, but not so tight it fuses together and then won't feed out. And tbh it hurts my hands. Though it does make for a nice A/c break mid-yardwork!

    96058.png?1619393207
Sign In or Register to comment.