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So I want to immigrate to the best damn country in the world

TetsugenTetsugen Registered User regular
edited July 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
For a little bit of background info, I just plan to be a Culinary Artist but would like to immigrate to America. Does anyone have experience going through the process? I've heard its extremely difficult right now, but I would just like to gain some insight.

Tetsugen on

Posts

  • FirstComradeStalinFirstComradeStalin Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Do you have any family in the States? That would help immensely in getting you through the system.

    FirstComradeStalin on
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  • DeusfauxDeusfaux Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    asd

    Deusfaux on
  • tofutofu Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    He would be immigrating to the US and emigrating from whatever country he's in now.

    Out of curiosity, why do you want to move to the US?

    tofu on
  • variantvariant Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    I'm going through it right now, it's pretty painless but then again, I'm on a green card so I'm just naturalizing, not immigrating. The immigration process was done by my parents and that took a good 11 years according to them, they say it's double now.

    variant on
  • TetsugenTetsugen Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    I have no relatives in the states at all, and I currently live in Canada.

    I find the Culinary scene up here to be a bit slow compared to America. There is a type of cooking style called Molecular Gastronomy which is basically 'Science cooking' and the top restaurants in the world are located in Europe and America. Although I would do my best to try getting into one of these restaurants, the reality is that my skill level isn't as high as the requirements, so I would most likely just jump from kitchen to kitchen in the states until either I've been accepted or just get better until I get accepted at my dream job.

    Now I know someone here is going to tell me I should just stay up in Canada until my skills develop to the point where I need them to be in order to get one of these jobs, but regardless many kitchens in America won't go out of their way to handle immigration paperwork for a starting Culinary Artist. My best bet (as also told from a few of my mentors and teachers up here in Edmonton) is to just work at kitchens that are close to the Molecular Gastronomy restaurants I want to get into and keep trying until they accept me.

    Now I'm done my rant, so please help me come up with ways I can get down into the states without getting married or hiding in someones trunk. Just imagine me to be some form of Pixar Rat except better looking and human.

    Tetsugen on
  • TetsugenTetsugen Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Also, it is out of the question that I move to Spain or England as I would like for my family to have easy access to visit me while I'm going through the process.

    Tetsugen on
  • FarseerBaradasFarseerBaradas Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    http://www.grasmick.com/canimfaq.htm

    According to this FAQ, it's apparently a lot easier for a Canadian citizen to immigrate here, there are some special privileges that you get.

    FarseerBaradas on
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  • DaricDaric Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Mostly it's because very few people want to leave Canada and come to America.

    Daric on
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  • LewishamLewisham Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    variant wrote: »
    I'm going through it right now, it's pretty painless but then again, I'm on a green card so I'm just naturalizing, not immigrating. The immigration process was done by my parents and that took a good 11 years according to them, they say it's double now.

    This is an entirely different situation. Please don't say it is easy when, for the majority, it is not. Anyone who has read H&A for a while will know that I am British in NZ on a work permit, and want to move to the USA in a couple of years.

    Emigrating is a very difficult process. It is not something that the home country considers lightly. Emigrating, and being allowed the privileges of a citizen of the country, is not the same as having a work permit and simply being allowed to stay there and take jobs. Being granted a work permit is a bit easier, but it will probably come with lots of strings attached as to where you can work, how long you can work there, proof that the job you are doing couldn't have been done by citizens of the country.

    However, it does look like the TN visa for Canadian citizens will be helpful, but you need to look at the limitations. It appears you need a degree of some description for a start.

    Going to the UK is relatively smooth as you are a member of the commonwealth, but again, work permits will come with a lot of strings attached.

    You will need to have a very good reason to go through all this. It is tiring and wears me down quite quickly.

    Lewisham on
  • ASimPersonASimPerson Cold... and hard.Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Have a look at these sites:
    http://travel.state.gov/
    http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis

    Summary from like two minutes worth of reading: unless you already have a job lined up, it's going to be difficult to get a visa that will allow you to work (and establish permanent resident in) the US.

    ASimPerson on
  • cfgausscfgauss Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Daric wrote: »
    Mostly it's because very few people want to leave Canada and come to America.

    No, it's because, believe it or not, we have a close relationship with Canada, and lots of agreements with them regarding these kinds of things.

    IIRC, part of the reason its so difficult is because we have quotas on how many people can come from each country here. So we end up only being to accept people with things like jobs/school/family already waiting for them here.

    cfgauss on
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  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited July 2007
    cfgauss wrote: »
    Daric wrote: »
    Mostly it's because very few people want to leave Canada and come to America.

    No, it's because, believe it or not, we have a close relationship with Canada, and lots of agreements with them regarding these kinds of things.

    IIRC, part of the reason its so difficult is because we have quotas on how many people can come from each country here. So we end up only being to accept people with things like jobs/school/family already waiting for them here.

    It's pretty much the same both ways, really. If you want to move to the USA and you're Canadian, you'd be insane to move somewhere else first.

    Pheezer on
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  • RhinoRhino TheRhinLOL Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Are you going to college of any type? There are some programs (via college) that let you Study in another country, even if you aren't a citizen. If you just want to study our Culinary scene then that might be a good and fast way to do it. Talk to your concealer about it.

    Rhino on
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  • TetsugenTetsugen Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Thanks for the many responses.

    Rhino:

    Unfortunately I have already completed my tenature at a culinary technical institute here in Canada. Not to brag but my ability to cook is quite advanced for my age (I had started working at my parents restarant helping around the kitchens when I was in Elementary school), and to re-take anything at an institution again is literally mental. Its not that I don't enjoy school, its that they don't teach anything out of common sense, and I usually get paired with a class whom the majority doesn't know what to do in life but "Just like to eat".

    And this isn't to bash America, but from my understanding the whole romance with the country is to be able to achieve something without the bias of where you come from and who you are. I am literally chasing a dream of gaining the ability to cook with molecular gastronomy, but still don't understand how come its so hard when the whole concept (belief and morals) is the that you can achieve anything if you set your minds to it. O_o

    Yet anyways, I was told today from my mother that I have an uncle on my father's side that is now a citizen in America. How does this help my chances of getting over the border?

    Tetsugen on
  • LewishamLewisham Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Tetsugen wrote: »

    And this isn't to bash America, but from my understanding the whole romance with the country is to be able to achieve something without the bias of where you come from and who you are. I am literally chasing a dream of gaining the ability to cook with molecular gastronomy, but still don't understand how come its so hard when the whole concept (belief and morals) is the that you can achieve anything if you set your minds to it. O_o

    Man, when has it ever been like that in the US in the last 20 years?
    Yet anyways, I was told today from my mother that I have an uncle on my father's side that is now a citizen in America. How does this help my chances of getting over the border?

    Not sure on this one; the only help I've seen relatives be is when they are immediate family or dependants.

    Lewisham on
  • Steel AngelSteel Angel Registered User regular
    edited July 2007
    Tetsugen wrote: »
    And this isn't to bash America, but from my understanding the whole romance with the country is to be able to achieve something without the bias of where you come from and who you are. I am literally chasing a dream of gaining the ability to cook with molecular gastronomy, but still don't understand how come its so hard when the whole concept (belief and morals) is the that you can achieve anything if you set your minds to it. O_o

    The reality of what happens when you mix immigration with many programs using government money started to become apparent after a while, among other reasons.
    Yet anyways, I was told today from my mother that I have an uncle on my father's side that is now a citizen in America. How does this help my chances of getting over the border?

    It certainly won't hurt. The cousin/niece of some family friends was able to at least get some sort of permission to come over a few years ago. While she was a college student, she was going to school at a community college so I'm not sure if it was only because of a student visa.

    Steel Angel on
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