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The $21/week Food Stamp Challenge

SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
edited September 2007 in Debate and/or Discourse
Some of you already might have heard about this:
Ryan and three other members of Congress have pledged to live for one week on $21 worth of food, the amount the average food stamp recipient receives in federal assistance. That's $3 a day or $1 a meal. They started yesterday.

Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) and Rep. Jo Ann Emerson (R-Mo.), co-chairmen of the House Hunger Caucus, called on lawmakers to take the "Food Stamp Challenge" to raise awareness of hunger and what they say are inadequate benefits for food stamp recipients. Only two others, Ryan and Janice Schakowsky (D-Ill.), took them up on it.

I guess there's also a blog: http://foodstampchallenge.typepad.com/

So here's the challenge. You have $21. Plan out one full week's worth of groceries for one person.

If you want to buy a long term staple, then try to consider how much the item costs, and then consider how many weeks you can make it last. e.g., "I'm going to spend $5 on Olive oil, which should last me about 2 months." So that's roughly 60 cents a week."

What can you come up with? The healthier and tastier your plan, the fewer the number of stores you need to visit, the better.

Schrodinger on
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Posts

  • FirstComradeStalinFirstComradeStalin Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Didn't some senators try this already and basically end up living like hobos?

    FirstComradeStalin on
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  • StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited September 2007
    Bread and Peanut Butter were about three bucks and can easily suffice as dinner/lunch. Oatmeal is cheap for breakfast unless we're also counting the water bill. Seriously, an off-brand tub of the shit is quite inexpensive. And of course, the old standby: Ramen.

    It's not hard, as I had to live off that for three weeks. But it's also not fun. Actually, the fact I no working computer to take my mind off the lack of decent food is what drove me nuts. Well...watching Food Network didn't help.

    I have no idea how long one can live off that, but the point is to, eventually, get a job and buy real food, yes?

    Sterica on
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  • FirstComradeStalinFirstComradeStalin Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Oh wait, I think before that it was some Senators trying to live entirely off of welfare, as in paying for housing and utlities and everything else. I'm pretty sure they ended up in the shittiest conditions imaginable. But yeah, $21 a week isn't that bad for simply groceries. Hell, you could even add meat into the equation assuming you have electricity and kitchenware covered already. That much money nets you a decent amount of chicken breast that you can cook up and eat with the ramen. Food is pretty cheap, though eating out and certain products are still pretty expensive compared to third-world nations.

    FirstComradeStalin on
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  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Well let's see... we got your meats covered, your grains covered, your proteins and fats covered... but it's almost as though we're forgetting something?

    Schrodinger on
  • FirstComradeStalinFirstComradeStalin Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Fruits and sum drank. Just grab some OJ or that delicious Minute Maid Fruit Punch.

    FirstComradeStalin on
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  • LiveWireLiveWire Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    You can definitely live on a $21/week food allowance. It's just not good living.

    Isn't that the point of welfare? Giving you the necessities without removing the incentive to go out and earn yourself a proper living? I don't see what the deal is, here.

    LiveWire on
  • StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited September 2007
    Well let's see... we got your meats covered, your grains covered, your proteins and fats covered... but it's almost as though we're forgetting something?
    The grocery store I work at sells bananas for one buck a bunch. I'd say meat is the most pricey food to buy.

    With such a small food budget, you'd likely have to alternate your diet to "rotate in" necessary things. Meat one week...maybe veggies the next.

    Sterica on
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  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Fruits and sum drank. Just grab some OJ or that delicious Minute Maid Fruit Punch.

    Most fruit juices are high in sugar, and not so much with the nutritional content.
    LiveWire wrote: »
    You can definitely live on a $21/week food allowance. It's just not good living.

    Isn't that the point of welfare? Giving you the necessities without removing the incentive to go out and earn yourself a proper living? I don't see what the deal is, here.

    So vitamins and nutrients don't qualify as a necessity?

    Schrodinger on
  • The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited September 2007
    LiveWire wrote: »
    You can definitely live on a $21/week food allowance. It's just not good living.

    Isn't that the point of welfare? Giving you the necessities without removing the incentive to go out and earn yourself a proper living? I don't see what the deal is, here.

    The problem is, I'd guess, that most people aren't good enough at planning to remain remotely healthy on that $21 a week. And that there are a number of people, like the disabled, who'll never be able to get off the payment.

    The Cat on
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  • Ant000Ant000 Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Man three dollars a meal, maybe. But I don't think I could ever manage this. How many people actually have to rely on food stamps that they couldn't up it to 40 dollars a week? I think a certain level of human dignity should be factored in to the whole necessity thing...


    Nowadays I wouldn't mind spending that entire weeks amount on a good breakfast... :oops:


    With 200 billion dollars being requested by the President for Iraq for 2008 alone... "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed." - Eisenhower

    Ant000 on
  • StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited September 2007
    The Cat wrote: »
    LiveWire wrote: »
    You can definitely live on a $21/week food allowance. It's just not good living.

    Isn't that the point of welfare? Giving you the necessities without removing the incentive to go out and earn yourself a proper living? I don't see what the deal is, here.
    The problem is, I'd guess, that most people aren't good enough at planning to remain remotely healthy on that $21 a week. And that there are a number of people, like the disabled, who'll never be able to get off the payment.
    You can't feed the people too well, as there has to be incentive to work, but I guess we can't have them starve either.

    Maybe Food Stamps and such should come with a list of recommended diets/budgets that are generally cheap at the major grocery chains?

    Sterica on
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  • StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited September 2007
    Ant000 wrote: »
    With 200 billion dollars being requested by the President for Iraq for 2008 alone... "Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies, in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed." - Eisenhower
    I'm not fan of the war myself, but that will end. The billions we get screwed out of via pointless pork projects has been going on forever, and yet so little outrage.

    But that's an issue for another thread.

    Sterica on
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  • FirstComradeStalinFirstComradeStalin Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Healthy living that isn't unsatisfying seems impossible to me at $21 a day. You could just drink water and eat plain fruit and maybe some beans for protein, but jazzing it up gets very complicated with those limits.

    FirstComradeStalin on
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  • StericaSterica Yes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited September 2007
    Healthy living that isn't unsatisfying seems impossible to me at $21 a day. You could just drink water and eat plain fruit and maybe some beans for protein, but jazzing it up gets very complicated with those limits.
    If you want to "jazz it up", you get a fucking job. I know there are special cases, but c'mon.

    Sterica on
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  • The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited September 2007
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    The Cat wrote: »
    LiveWire wrote: »
    You can definitely live on a $21/week food allowance. It's just not good living.

    Isn't that the point of welfare? Giving you the necessities without removing the incentive to go out and earn yourself a proper living? I don't see what the deal is, here.
    The problem is, I'd guess, that most people aren't good enough at planning to remain remotely healthy on that $21 a week. And that there are a number of people, like the disabled, who'll never be able to get off the payment.
    You can't feed the people too well, as there has to be incentive to work, but I guess we can't have them starve either.

    Maybe Food Stamps and such should come with a list of recommended diets/budgets that are generally cheap at the major grocery chains?
    I'm going to gently suggest at this point that there are vanishingly few people on this planet truly content to do nothing because they have just enough money for a little food and nothing else. Unless welfare paid $40000 a year, you're not going to get people flocking to it.

    Nutritional education should be a core school subject, far as I'm concerned. Food stamp programs also need to stop being subverted by lobbyists into becoming clearinghouses for surplus food products. That's why a lot of them are so bad; they'll let you buy all sorts of horrible unhealthy stuff and pretty much railroad poor people onto the get-diabetes-in-under-a-year diet.

    The Cat on
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  • Ant000Ant000 Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    I think the idea that if you give people too much money in food stamps they'll be unmotivated to work is pretty retarded. I mean even if you doubled it to 42 dollars a week, that's still poverty level eating. Yet, it would go a long way to enabling healthy eating habits and elevating people out of some pretty sub-human living standards. There's a myriad of other incentives for people to get out there and work if they're capable, such as not having to live in a fucking box; I don't think ensuring everyone has access to adequate food is going to negatively impact society :).

    Ant000 on
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    BTW, just to make this more interesting, you can go to Safeway.com, select "browse," and gather actual prices. So for starters:

    Quaker Hot Cereal Oatmeal Regular - 42 Oz: $2.50 (Sale price, normally $4.49).
    Safeway/Vons Peanut Butter Reduced Fat Chunky - 18 Oz: $1.85 (Normally $2.05)
    Safeway/Vons Round Top Enriched Wheat Bread - 24 Oz: $1.79 (Normally $2.09)
    5.50 LB Safeway Chicken Thighs Extreme Value - $4.35
    Bananas: $0.40/each
    Tropicana Premium Pure Orange Juice - 64 Fl. Oz.: $3.00 (Normally $4.69)

    So without the bananas, that's somewhere between $13.49 - 17.67, depending on whether or not the stuff happens to be on sale. Also, I seriously doubt that a single loaf of bread can last a single person through a week, if he's constantly eating peanut butter sandwiches as a main source of nutrition. Oh, and do you want anything on your oatmeal, like brown sugar or cinnamon? Or are you content with eating it plain?

    One banana a day would be $2.80, two bananas a day would be $5.40. And bananas aren't even that nutritionally dense, as far as fruit goes.

    And we still don't have any vegetables.

    Schrodinger on
  • Grid SystemGrid System Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    I'm going to try to do this. Not actually live for a week on $21 but maybe try a budget. Are there any sites other than Safeway that give actual prices? Just 'cause I'm pretty sure Safeway isn't the cheapest gorcery store out there.

    Grid System on
  • FirstComradeStalinFirstComradeStalin Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Rorus Raz wrote: »
    Healthy living that isn't unsatisfying seems impossible to me at $21 a day. You could just drink water and eat plain fruit and maybe some beans for protein, but jazzing it up gets very complicated with those limits.
    If you want to "jazz it up", you get a fucking job. I know there are special cases, but c'mon.

    And I agree. But my point is that there really isn't any reason to expect these people on welfare to eat healthy when it's just more satisfying to eat whatever the fuck you want.

    FirstComradeStalin on
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  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    I'm going to try to do this. Not actually live for a week on $21 but maybe try a budget. Are there any sites other than Safeway that give actual prices? Just 'casue I'm pretty sure Safeway isn't the cheapest gorcery store out there.

    Maybe not, but it's a pretty common store that a lot of poor people will shop at. If you have to drive 30 miles for a better price, then it's not a realistic scenario.

    Anyway, it would also be interesting to hear this from a Canadian perspective. Would $21 go any further in Canada than it does in the US?

    Schrodinger on
  • IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Seriously.

    Burritos.

    1lb=$3=10 mini-burritos=3000 calories

    You'll be gassy as hell, but you can sure as heck survive on rather little.

    There's a website somewhere where a woman feeds her entire family of four on $200 a month without feeding them utter filth.

    I don't pay that much more, myself.

    I've even read of someone getting a month of groceries at -organic- stores for like $270.

    The only major issue here is the tendency for ignorance and/or stupidity/laziness being associated with joblessness.

    Really, if you just dodge brand names and such, you're on a great start.

    Incenjucar on
  • Marty81Marty81 Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    So they're taking the national average food stamp benefit and trying to survive on it in one of the more expensive-to-live areas of the nation? That doesn't make a lot of sense to me, but maybe some good will come of it.

    Marty81 on
  • NexelauNexelau Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    From what I've seen posted here it seems very possible to feed yourself on that amount (I don't really understand how much US$ buys, so have to go by what people who do say).. it doesn't really surprise me however, I know from experience that you can live healthily on welfare. I think the main problem is the tendency for people to try and eat convenient and quick foods, be unwilling to shop around for their ingredients, and be totally ignorant of their dietary needs

    I really think that it would be a good idea for governments to produce some sort of "budget diet" guides, that got handed out with benefits like these... simple recipes that are almost universally affordable, perhaps with a small amount of extra cash available if someone is in a situation where they don't have even basic cooking utensils.

    Nexelau on
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Incenjucar wrote: »
    There's a website somewhere where a woman feeds her entire family of four on $200 a month without feeding them utter filth.

    Apparently she does it buy buying huge quantities of food at a time, like 100-200 pounds worth, and vacuum sealing it.

    Which requires somewhat of a hefty initial investment that most poor people can't afford. Not to mention the problems that will occur in the event of a blackout. Assuming that their freezer is even big enough.

    It also requires that you have a personal garden for growing your own vegetables. Again, not practical for a lot of poor people.

    Schrodinger on
  • IncenjucarIncenjucar VChatter Seattle, WARegistered User regular
    edited September 2007
    I'm not saying that replicating her exactly is feasible. But there's some serious money you can save with things unlikely to parish.

    But, again, there's the ignorance issue.

    Incenjucar on
  • Grid SystemGrid System Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    I can't seem to find any useful Canadian sites so I guess I'll stick with Safeway for now.

    Safeway Lentil Beans - 16 Oz - $1.05
    Carrots Prepacked - 2 Lb - $1.29
    Safeway SELECT Verdi Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 17 Fl. Oz. - $4.49
    Organic Celery - 1 Lb - $.99

    All that and a bit of salt and pepper is enough to make a lentil soup that's reasonably healthy. Some tomatoes would make it better. If everything is used to make one batch, there should be enough for seven meals right there (assuming refrigeration is an option). The olive oil will last way more than a week, of course.

    Quaker Hot Cereal Oatmeal Quick - 42 Oz - $2.50
    Milk - Quart - $1.59
    Plums - 1.5 Lb - $2.34

    I dunno, something like that could work for breakfast, right? The oatmeal will also last way past a week.

    Ovenjoy Bread Wheat Roundtop - 16 Oz - $0.89
    Safeway/Vons Peanut Butter Creamy - 28 Oz - $2.50
    Smuckers Concord Grape Jelly Value Pack - 48 Oz - $3.00

    And there's lunch.

    That brings me to a total of $20.64, but the longer uses of the olive oil, oatmeal, peanut butter, and jelly should count for something. Only $8.15 worth of goods will need to be replaced every week, which certainly leaves a decent amount of cash free for buying other items to supplement the diet like fruit juices, canned vegetables, fish or meat, etc. And, once that's being done, each meal type will be able to last that much longer.

    It isn't a wonderful diet, but a person can live on it I think.

    Grid System on
  • VeegeezeeVeegeezee Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    from safeway.com:
      pasta - $0.77 / lb, 700 calories
      rice - $0.65 / lb, 800 calories
      beans - $0.60 / lb, 200 calories
      eggs - $2.39 / dozen, 960 calories
      potatoes - $0.53 / lb, 800 calories

    Budgeting some permutation of these and some fruits and meats, you can eat at the rate of six or seven hundred calories per dollar. Alternatively, you could comfortably spend $0.75 / lb on dry dog food at as much as 1500 calories per pound. :P

    Veegeezee on
  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    It occurs to me that the conclusion "you can but it's not fun" (that at least some people have drawn here) would at least seem to indicate the program might be exactly where you want it to be. I mean, if you could live well off only food stamps, I'm not entirely sure that'd be a good thing.

    electricitylikesme on
  • KeamienKeamien Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    I'm not entirely sure how it worked 20 some years ago, but food stamps + welfare kept my family going for roughly 11 years. My father was part of the Air Force, my mother worked various oddjobs in the service industry. Every photo I have ever seen of this period of their lives, my parents are emaciated. Us kids were fine because we were always fed first. This is not a good way to live, and often they got by on the help of friends and family (Grandparents, who lived on the other side of the country, showing up with a car full of groceries).

    What I am focusing on here is that not everyone on foodstamps is jobless. Sometimes the job doen't cover all the bills.


    EDIT: Jobless? rather, Unemployed

    Keamien on
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    It occurs to me that the conclusion "you can but it's not fun" (that at least some people have drawn here) would at least seem to indicate the program might be exactly where you want it to be. I mean, if you could live well off only food stamps, I'm not entirely sure that'd be a good thing.

    There's really no upper limit to how much better/expensive food can get. Even if you could get everything you needed for a tasty/healthy diet on a food stamp budget, that doesn't mean you don't have an incentive to earn even more money so that you can eat something even tastier/healthier. Especially when you factor in the desire to go out every now and then. And the need for non-food related luxuries, like a better living space, or a nicer car.

    As other people have pointed out, they can spend $21 for a decent breakfast. I doubt it's because you need to spend $21 for something tasty/healthy. So the incentive to earn more for better food is always there.

    Edit: And Keamien brings up a good point. What happens to the children, who are too young to get a job? Should they be forced to suffer because their parents can't afford healthy foods?

    Schrodinger on
  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    I can't seem to find any useful Canadian sites so I guess I'll stick with Safeway for now.

    Safeway Lentil Beans - 16 Oz - $1.05
    Carrots Prepacked - 2 Lb - $1.29
    Safeway SELECT Verdi Extra Virgin Olive Oil - 17 Fl. Oz. - $4.49
    Organic Celery - 1 Lb - $.99

    All that and a bit of salt and pepper is enough to make a lentil soup that's reasonably healthy. Some tomatoes would make it better. If everything is used to make one batch, there should be enough for seven meals right there (assuming refrigeration is an option). The olive oil will last way more than a week, of course.

    Quaker Hot Cereal Oatmeal Quick - 42 Oz - $2.50
    Milk - Quart - $1.59
    Plums - 1.5 Lb - $2.34

    I dunno, something like that could work for breakfast, right? The oatmeal will also last way past a week.

    Ovenjoy Bread Wheat Roundtop - 16 Oz - $0.89
    Safeway/Vons Peanut Butter Creamy - 28 Oz - $2.50
    Smuckers Concord Grape Jelly Value Pack - 48 Oz - $3.00

    And there's lunch.

    That brings me to a total of $20.64, but the longer uses of the olive oil, oatmeal, peanut butter, and jelly should count for something. Only $8.15 worth of goods will need to be replaced every week, which certainly leaves a decent amount of cash free for buying other items to supplement the diet like fruit juices, canned vegetables, fish or meat, etc. And, once that's being done, each meal type will be able to last that much longer.

    It isn't a wonderful diet, but a person can live on it I think.

    Yeah, as I said, things like Olive oil should already be factored as a longterm expense.

    Really, I don't even know why grape jelly is on this list. It's 14% of your budget, and it basically adds nothing but pure sugar. You could spend the same money on extra fruit or vegetables or something.

    foodchart.php?id=14

    foodchart.php?id=35

    But anyway, thanks for making a solid effort, and participating in this thread.

    Schrodinger on
  • JimmyJimmy __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2007
    Ok, so my grocery list from Friday:

    4 Roast Chicken Ramen
    1 Large Onion
    1 6 Pack Dole Pineapple Juice
    1 Bag Iceburg lettuce
    2lbs Ground Hamburger
    1/2 Galon Milk
    1 Loaf of White Bread
    1 Can Manwhich
    1 Soft Taco kit
    1 Pack Oscar Meyer Roast Turkey Breast
    1 Ben & jerry's Karamel Sutra Ice Cream
    1 Smoked Sausage Kielbasa
    2 Large Potatoes
    1 Box Nutrigrain bars

    Grand Total - $29.38

    Cutting out the Ice Cream and getting a cheaper brand of lunch meat and sausage, getting a head of lettuce instead of the premade and getting a large can of Pineapple juice instead of the 6 prepacked cans and Im right about at the $21 dollar mark.

    Im a single 25yr old, so most of the meals I make will last me 2 days anyway. If I had it my way, people would be given 7 MRE's a week instead of food stamps. There are over 3000 calories per MRE and they cost roughly $3.50 a piece. If its good enough for us troops at war, why isnt it good enough for the people ?

    Jimmy on
  • Ant000Ant000 Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Jimmy wrote: »
    Im a single 25yr old, so most of the meals I make will last me 2 days anyway. If I had it my way, people would be given 7 MRE's a week instead of food stamps. There are over 3000 calories per MRE and they cost roughly $3.50 a piece. If its good enough for us troops at war, why isnt it good enough for the people ?


    That's an intriguing idea ... or at least have MREs make up the bulk, with some supplemental food stamps for some occasional obscurity. Are they meant to be consumed over long periods of time though? Nutritionally (vitamins etc) speaking? Or are they just calorie bags until you can get back to base?

    Ant000 on
  • Torso BoyTorso Boy Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Eat at Ikea.

    Torso Boy on
  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Ant000 wrote: »
    Jimmy wrote: »
    Im a single 25yr old, so most of the meals I make will last me 2 days anyway. If I had it my way, people would be given 7 MRE's a week instead of food stamps. There are over 3000 calories per MRE and they cost roughly $3.50 a piece. If its good enough for us troops at war, why isnt it good enough for the people ?


    That's an intriguing idea ... or at least have MREs make up the bulk, with some supplemental food stamps for some occasional obscurity. Are they meant to be consumed over long periods of time though? Nutritionally (vitamins etc) speaking? Or are they just calorie bags until you can get back to base?
    Wikipedia wrote:
    Each meal provides approximately 1,200 Calories (1,200 kcal or 5,000 kJ). General contents include: a main course high in starch; crackers; a cheese, peanut butter, or jelly spread; a dessert or snack; powdered beverage mix; an accessory packet; a plastic spoon; a beverage bag; and a flameless ration heater (FRH). However, not every MRE contains all listed items. They are intended to be eaten for a maximum of twenty-one days, and have a shelf life of three years.[2]

    EDIT: Everything I've ever heard about MRE's starting from about the Vietnam era and moving forwards suggests that if you can get something else, do so (which is why the Australians were well liked because for a while we had dehydrated food which was a lot better apparently).

    electricitylikesme on
  • JeanJean Heartbroken papa bear Gatineau, QuébecRegistered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Let me see if you could do this in Canada

    I'm doing my ''shopping'' at Metro BTW and i'm taking whats in special this week

    Yogurt - 8x100g - $2
    Strawberries - 1lb - $2
    Spagethini - 1,800g - $2
    100% pure orange juice - 2L - $2
    Italian sausages - 1kg - $4
    Pita bread - 500g - $2
    Apples - 4lb - $3
    Diced Tomatoes - 2x540mL - $2

    I'm right at $21 and I have something from every food group and no junk food. Obviously tough you're very dependant of what's in special that week, especially for meat.

    Jean on
    "You won't destroy us, You won't destroy our democracy. We are a small but proud nation. No one can bomb us to silence. No one can scare us from being Norway. This evening and tonight, we'll take care of each other. That's what we do best when attacked'' - Jens Stoltenberg
  • The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited September 2007
    Food seems awfully cheap in the US, even accounting for exchange rates

    The Cat on
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  • RegrettableRegrettable Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Outlandish over-production is a great thing.

    Regrettable on
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  • AridholAridhol Daddliest Catch Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    From a canadian perspective here's what I came up with.


    1lb green beens, raw not canned from farmers market $2
    3lbs bannanas $1
    10lbs rice $7
    2lbs beef (half ground half stir fry) $5
    soya sauce $0.80 / week
    "western family" juices usually about $1.80 for 2L so....$3 / week say
    Cheap off brand puffed wheat or bran flakes and milk $2/week


    So no lunches, barely enough meat, no butter, no bread.

    Living on $21 a week is fucking rediculous. I would not feed myself or any kids I'd have on less than $50.

    Aridhol on
  • RegrettableRegrettable Registered User regular
    edited September 2007
    Why is everyone putting fruit juices on these lists?

    Regrettable on
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