As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/
Options

New guitar

thorpethorpe Registered User regular
edited December 2007 in Help / Advice Forum
So Christmastime is coming up, and I've been informed by my parents that now would be the time to ask for a new guitar. I'm pretty proficient with acoustic (I've got a steel-stringed Martin right now), and I've been thinking about trying my hand with an electric. The thing is, I am utterly clueless when it comes to what would be a good model or amp. I'm not looking for anything too expensive: 500-600 is the limit, and even that's pushing it.

Recommend me a good, cheap electric guitar/amp combo H/A!

[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
thorpe on

Posts

  • Options
    RemingtonRemington Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Aww man. I JUST sold a guitar on E-Bay for 450 bucks and I would have much rather delt with a PA person than that jackass.

    This is the one I sold.

    9890098a.jpg

    I'm not a guitar guy, I was selling it for a friend, but I've seen nothing but good reviews for that guitar (and it was bought for 800 bucks new). There's plenty more on EBay, too if it interests you. It's a Epiphone Zakk Wylde Les Paul Custom Electric Guitar Bulls-Eye. My friend bought it from here originally:

    http://www.guitarcenter.com/Epiphone-Zakk-Wylde-Les-Paul-Custom-Electric-Guitar-Bulls-Eye-101892289-i1150007.gc

    I don't know anything about amps, though.

    Remington on
  • Options
    limester816limester816 Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    It all depends on what you want to play, hollowbodies are great for jazz, but feedback in rock, solidbodies are great for rock, but in some cases don't have the tonality required for jazz. For first guitars, I personally like semi-hollow guitars, like the gibson es-335 - I think PRS has a semihollow SE that would be worth checking out, and strats are always great. Go for the mexican strat and upgrade, rather than the usa strat.

    As far as amps go, you can get some good modeling amps for cheap, the Roland Cubes sound really good, but I personally like Fender tube amps. The Blues Jr. in my opinion sounds great with any guitar.

    limester816 on
  • Options
    PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2007
    Don't buy a modelling amp, especially not an affordable one. They're shit in a box.

    If you're just practicing solo, get whatever 20 W amp works and is cheapest. It'll be solid state and it'll therefore probably survive a very long time with the worst that could happen being a blown fuse that any idiot can replace. If you're going to use it for practicing with a drummer and a bassist, you'll want something bigger. 60 W or more, with an efficient set of drivers in it, 100 W or more if you're getting a low quality amp. Higher quality speakers push more volume with less power but cost more (and weigh less and depreciate slower).


    That aside, if you're new to an electric, spend no more than $400 and no less than $200. And for the love of god buy used. New guitars are unreasonably priced (see the above poster whose pretty minty looking $800 guitar just sold for $450). Used guitars will re-sell for what you pay for it as long as you're gentle on it. So spend $400 on a used guitar that's seen light use and it'll be juuuust fine.

    And if you're going to look at pedals, only buy one, and make it a distortion pedal, preferably of the overdrive style. Spend $75 or so and don't buy something that has more than one effect built in and don't buy anything labeled as "digital". You want either a transistor or a tube based overdrive pedal. Tube sounds better but costs far more and transistor pedals like Boss's DS line are great. Boss makes pedals that won't break. You can buy one used and not get screwed.

    As to what brand/type of guitar you want, that will depend heavily on what style you want to play. A few pointers for buying used though:
    Squier guitars have bodies that are made from two pieces, glued together. They're cost effective and work, but over time will warp in ways that guitars which are properly constructed (from a single piece of wood) will not. They will warp sooner and more severely and this will affect sound and ruin the instrument. So I wouldn't buy one used.

    This does not apply to proper Fender guitars. I do not know if the same happens between Epiphone vs. Gibson, but I would not be in any way surprised if they were pulling the exact same trick to keep costs down.

    Cheaper guitars have cheaper soldering and general construction and you'll need to spend the $50 you saved taking it in to a tech to have the thing re-wired inside. Don't cheap out. Buy something by a proper company. This does not apply nearly so much to amplifiers.

    Peavey guitars are generally an exception, and are cheap because they're not marketed very well but typically hold up just fine. Ibanez and Gibson guitars are marketed too well and cost too much. Get a Fender, Peavey or a Yamaha. Yes, Yamaha makes good instruments.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • Options
    MishraMishra Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I got my american strat on craig's list for $600 of course if that's your upper limit you might want to go a bit lower so you can get an amp. You might be able to find one cheaper.

    Mishra on
    "Give a man a fire, he's warm for the night. Set a man on fire he's warm for the rest of his life."
    -Terry Pratchett
  • Options
    oldsakoldsak Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I also recommend getting a used guitar if you can find one you like. Ebay is a great resource, but pawn shops and local music stores sometimes have good finds as well.

    If you go used, you're going to need to take it to a guitar tech and have it set up properly to get the most out of it.

    I second DrDizaster's recommendation of peavey guitars. I've owned several electrics and the best bang for my buck was definitely a used peavey faux telecaster I got off ebay for $200.

    oldsak on
  • Options
    PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2007
    oldsak wrote: »
    I also recommend getting a used guitar if you can find one you like. Ebay is a great resource, but pawn shops and local music stores sometimes have good finds as well.

    If you go used, you're going to need to take it to a guitar tech and have it set up properly to get the most out of it.

    Unless you know how to do it yourself, you'll need to have this done on a new instrument too, so make sure the shop agrees to do this for you if you buy new. You'll be overspending by such a degree that they should be happy to do it for free.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • Options
    Lord YodLord Yod Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Third'ing the Peavey recommendation. Several of my friends have 'em and love 'em. My sister started playing with a Peavey bass, and it sounds awesome.

    My recommendation would be to not worry too much about the various options that you can get on an electric. You don't really need a 5-way effects switch or 3 different types of pickups. You can get something cheaper and work your way into it just fine.

    Now as for pickups, you'll want to get them matched to what you play, if you play a specific style. If you want to play a lot of heavy rock/metal type stuff, humbuckers are usually the easiest to get that sound with. Single-coil pickups tend to have a brighter, cleaner tone, and work great for more jazzy or softer stuff. That said, tone comes from the hands, so you can make do with either one.

    Bonus points if you get an amp that goes to 11.

    Lord Yod on
    steam_sig.png
  • Options
    flatlinegraphicsflatlinegraphics Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    used if at all possible. keep an eye on your local craigslist.

    if not, rondomusic has passible entry level electrics. hell, some electronics and hardware upgrades and they are more than passible.

    avoid beginner packs. they are a tremendous waste of money. you will never sell the amp, and the guitar is nigh on useless.

    as for specifics, it really depends on what you play. go to a store and physically sit down and play everything in your range. find the one that plays the best. playablility can vary widely among the same brand. american fenders and gibsons are going to be out of your range. if you can find a g&l tribute, great. squires are really hit or miss, and usually require modifications to really be good. this may not even be noticed on a first electric, but its something to consider. as for single coils vrs humbuckers.. thats a giant debate... huge. really depends on your playing style, and what you are trying to get. you can do anything with anything (tone is in the fingers), but its easier to get particular sounds with different pickups.

    as for amps, the epiphone valve juniors, at around $100, are great. add a $40 eq pedal, and you have a really nice little tube amp. past that, peaveys can usually be found cheap, and good. the classic 30 is a great sleeper, but those usually clock in around 300ish. modellers are ok, but the cheap ones a really a bag of ass. the newer, higher end models can be ok to good, but they take some work to dial in.

    flatlinegraphics on
  • Options
    DirtyDirtyVagrantDirtyDirtyVagrant Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I like my dean. Just make sure if you get one that you aren't buying one with a floyd rose build. It's a mess to tune.

    DirtyDirtyVagrant on
  • Options
    Blake TBlake T Do you have enemies then? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
  • Options
    DirtyDirtyVagrantDirtyDirtyVagrant Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Nope.

    DirtyDirtyVagrant on
  • Options
    thorpethorpe Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Thanks duders! This should be enough info, methinks. Feel free to lock, mods.

    thorpe on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Blaket wrote: »

    No way, you can get one of those in a guitar center during a good sale for that price, and get to play it first.

    Alright, here's my advice, and I've repeated it a lot in these threads...

    1) Go to a guitar shop, find a guitar you like, play it, play it hard, decide it's the one you want, and get THAT guitar. Don't let them go walking to the back and find you one in a box. Buy the guitar you just finished wailing on and you enjoy.

    2) On amps: The amp is just important as the guitar, but you're still learning/on a budget, so don't go crazy. I'm always going to plug the line six series of amps, because I love them. I've used them all from the starter models to the high ends, and never has one let me down. Cheap too...


    Good luck, and have fun.

    amateurhour on
    are YOU on the beer list?
  • Options
    thorpethorpe Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    For those interested, btw, I'm looking strongly at this model on Peavey's website. http://peavey.com/products/browse.cfm/action/detail/cat/43/item/105558/number/00489450/RaptorSeries.cfm

    thorpe on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2007
    Play one in a store before you decide.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • Options
    cliffskicliffski Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Ibanez are the best make all round IMHO. In the long run, a guitar is only as good as the quality of its neck. You can always get a new guitar, but adapting to a new neck can be tricky, so get one with the best quality fretboard you can, and that's ibanez.

    cliffski on
  • Options
    SamSam Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    DrDizaster wrote: »
    Don't buy a modelling amp, especially not an affordable one. They're shit in a box.

    If you're just practicing solo, get whatever 20 W amp works and is cheapest. It'll be solid state and it'll therefore probably survive a very long time with the worst that could happen being a blown fuse that any idiot can replace. If you're going to use it for practicing with a drummer and a bassist, you'll want something bigger. 60 W or more, with an efficient set of drivers in it, 100 W or more if you're getting a low quality amp. Higher quality speakers push more volume with less power but cost more (and weigh less and depreciate slower).


    That aside, if you're new to an electric, spend no more than $400 and no less than $200. And for the love of god buy used. New guitars are unreasonably priced (see the above poster whose pretty minty looking $800 guitar just sold for $450). Used guitars will re-sell for what you pay for it as long as you're gentle on it. So spend $400 on a used guitar that's seen light use and it'll be juuuust fine.

    And if you're going to look at pedals, only buy one, and make it a distortion pedal, preferably of the overdrive style. Spend $75 or so and don't buy something that has more than one effect built in and don't buy anything labeled as "digital". You want either a transistor or a tube based overdrive pedal. Tube sounds better but costs far more and transistor pedals like Boss's DS line are great. Boss makes pedals that won't break. You can buy one used and not get screwed.

    As to what brand/type of guitar you want, that will depend heavily on what style you want to play. A few pointers for buying used though:
    Squier guitars have bodies that are made from two pieces, glued together. They're cost effective and work, but over time will warp in ways that guitars which are properly constructed (from a single piece of wood) will not. They will warp sooner and more severely and this will affect sound and ruin the instrument. So I wouldn't buy one used.

    This does not apply to proper Fender guitars. I do not know if the same happens between Epiphone vs. Gibson, but I would not be in any way surprised if they were pulling the exact same trick to keep costs down.

    Cheaper guitars have cheaper soldering and general construction and you'll need to spend the $50 you saved taking it in to a tech to have the thing re-wired inside. Don't cheap out. Buy something by a proper company. This does not apply nearly so much to amplifiers.

    Peavey guitars are generally an exception, and are cheap because they're not marketed very well but typically hold up just fine. Ibanez and Gibson guitars are marketed too well and cost too much. Get a Fender, Peavey or a Yamaha. Yes, Yamaha makes good instruments.

    Aren't some Fenders (and a few Gibsons) cheaper than some Squier and Epiphone models?

    Sam on
  • Options
    SamSam Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I've had a Mexican Fender strat for a couple years. I like it it, ran me about 300.

    Sam on
  • Options
    HlubockyHlubocky Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Man, I went to the guitar center looking at amps the other day and the Blues Jr. blew me away. Too bad it is too loud for my condo... dang. I'll have to stick with the Microcube for now. That little tube amp blew me away however. It has unbelievable tone if you like that warm tube sound with a bit of overdrive.

    Hlubocky on
  • Options
    themightypuckthemightypuck MontanaRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Deleted.

    themightypuck on
    “Reject your sense of injury and the injury itself disappears.”
    ― Marcus Aurelius

    Path of Exile: themightypuck
  • Options
    SpackleSpackle Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Hlubocky wrote: »
    Man, I went to the guitar center looking at amps the other day and the Blues Jr. blew me away. Too bad it is too loud for my condo... dang. I'll have to stick with the Microcube for now. That little tube amp blew me away however. It has unbelievable tone if you like that warm tube sound with a bit of overdrive.

    I have this amp. It's not to loud, you just can't really crank it which does suck as part of owning a tube amp is getting that overdriven authentic tube sound. I often put a DS-1 in front to give it some extra crunch which helps at lower volumes.

    It's been a great amp, plenty of power and lots of life.

    Spackle on
    Taco Bell does win the franchise war according to the tome of knowledge that is Demolition Man. However, I've watched Demolition Man more then a few times and never once did I see WoW. In conclusion Taco Bell has more lasting power then WoW.
    D&D Metal Thread: HERE
Sign In or Register to comment.