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Whats a good breakfest?

EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
edited January 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
Don't say Oatmeal because the only way I can eat that is with lots of fruit and besides I can't eat that everyday. Starting in spring I plan to ride my bike to school about 12 miles there and 12 miles back. It is in central FL so its really not that bad of a ride and takes me about an hour to do but I know after about 3 weeks of riding I could get it down to 30-45 min. The problem is I need something that won't take more then 10-15 min to make. I usually eat Life cereal and it is great but not for a ride I would run out of energy so fast. I am also trying to lose weight too. Oh any suggestions on what to eat for the ride home because the school has nothing healthy to eat.

I am so excited on how much weight I will lose from this and how much money in gas I will save riding over 100 miles a week. All the back and forth from school really kills things for me.

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  • The Black HunterThe Black Hunter The key is a minimum of compromise, and a simple, unimpeachable reason to existRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    weetbix.jpg

    That or your equivelant.

    3 or 4, more if you can, fill it halfway with milk and wack some honey on there.

    Then eat.

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  • ChopperDaveChopperDave Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    i'm told by my sports-playing friends that a bagel w/ cream cheese, a hard boiled egg, and two cups of Gatorade will cover you pretty well as far as morning energy is concerned. I don't know how much I would trust them, being college jocks and all :P

    A breakfast burrito can be a really good, healthy source of energy too. Wholegrain tortilla, refried beans, avocado, and some salsa's all you need. Just heat up the beans, or cook them along with the tortilla in a skillet for 2-3 minutes, add everything else and you're good to go.

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  • Mike DangerMike Danger "Diane..." a place both wonderful and strangeRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    In my experience bicycling, I'll usually have a breakfast burrito (the microwaveable kind), some sausages, and some cereal with milk or the aforementioned bagel w/ cream cheese and juice if I'm in more of a hurry.

    I highly recommend investing in a Platypus/Camelbak if you haven't done so already, and the biking becomes a thing for you. I got one for Christmas one year before they were really popular, and it's got to be one of the most useful things I've ever received.

    Good things for while you're out there: trail mix (buy it or make it yourself), granola bars (some people swear by Powerbars and that "goop" junk--I find that the goop is pretty gross, and the Powerbars just aren't worth the $$.), water. Again, Platypus--but even if you don't want to buy one, bring the water anyhow. Getting dehydrated is no fun at all, and you won't look like the cool, refreshed biker guy when you get there. ;)

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  • Not SarastroNot Sarastro __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    At the moment, you have:

    Eat X calories + burn no calories = fat

    The way to fix that is:

    Eat X calories + burn X calories = not fat

    (Which is what you would do if you rode your bike, and kept eating what you do at the moment)

    What you are proposing is:

    Eat 2X calories, + burn X calories = ?


    Obviously not accurate, but if you up what you are eating to compensate for the extra exercise, it's probable you won't lose weight like you want. Cycling doesn't actually do much for weight loss unless you are doing hundreds of miles a week, because it doesn't use nearly as much energy as running etc. For example, if you stuck that burrito thing & sausages into your diet, you are adding hundreds of calories that will probably offset the amount you lose cycling. Also, cycling 12 miles at those paces shouldn't kill you energy-wise, and if you are a bit overweight already, you have the reserves to burn.

    You are going to need to go a little hungry, and feel a little tired to start off with - that's how you lose the weight and get back into doing exercise, it's pretty unavoidable.

    MikeDanger is right about water though, it is much, much more important for avoiding feeling drained than food is, so take plenty.

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  • EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Cereal is great for you because it's so fortified, but it can take a while to eat. Bananas are SUPER quick and really, really good for you if you're bike riding. When the weather was nicer I would typically bookend my work day with bananas, and I felt really good.

    There's a lot of casual research out there, but typically the way to do it "best" is to sort the food you eat into categories, and eat it in that order. The sorting method is based on when you'll be at peak energy and when the energy from the food is available. I personally think it's partial quack science, but it makes some sense. The basic idea is that meats and nuts take longer to digest and be available for energy compared to sugars, so you want to start with meats and finish with carbs. I personally skip on carbs for breakfast so when I do a "power breakfast" it's fried slices of ham (deli ham or breakfast ham, fried about 5 minutes to firm it up), a scrambled egg, and a banana. You eat it in that order (ham, then egg, then banana), and then get ready to go (about 10 minutes before you actually get on the bike). I definitely feel energized on those mornings, BUT I do it infrequently so I can't compare to a slower, cereal breakfast.

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  • MidshipmanMidshipman Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I attended a very interesting lecture by a nutritionist from Stanford. One of his recommendations for breakfast was an apple, some yogurt, and some non-sugary cereal.

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  • ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    You are biking 12 miles to... UCF? Just a guess. But if you are, fuck man. I fear for your safety.

    But I applaud your initiative. Good luck.

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  • Pizza&CoffeePizza&Coffee Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I hope you plan on taking a shower when you get to school. It's not going to be fun to sweat like a pig through class, for you and those sitting around you.

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  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    You probably want some fruit (for some faster energy), a bowl of healthy cereal (Kashii Go Lean is pretty awesome), and protein of some sort (hard-boiled eggs are about the easiest/fastest).

    Thanatos on
  • EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    You are biking 12 miles to... UCF? Just a guess. But if you are, fuck man. I fear for your safety.

    But I applaud your initiative. Good luck.


    No, not quite so central FL. I bike to UF and one time I rode all the way there just to fall off my bike when I caught the edge of the sidewalk..


    I already have a Water Pack and the damn Pouch got mold in because I left water in it. I think I was drinking too much water because you don't need almost 2 litters of water for 20 something miles but I do miss it. I used to fill it up with ice and water, god so refreshing.

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  • EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    I hope you plan on taking a shower when you get to school. It's not going to be fun to sweat like a pig through class, for you and those sitting around you.


    That was one of my huge problems especially coming up here in the spring and the fact that I wear ugly mtn bike shorts and a white work out shirt thats slightly reflective but just think if I did this everyday until summer I will once again be thin. Another thing I am thinking about doing is going to the gym before I leave college but I fear it might wear me out too much before the ride home. Maybe I could work out at the gym, then do homework at school, eat a little then ride home.

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  • supabeastsupabeast Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Fifteen minutes is ample time to scramble three or four eggs and make two slices of whole-wheat toast. Throw in a banana spoonful of peanut butter and you’ll have all the nutrients you need to get through the ride and hold you untill lunch.

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  • EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    supabeast wrote: »
    Fifteen minutes is ample time to scramble three or four eggs and make two slices of whole-wheat toast. Throw in a banana spoonful of peanut butter and you’ll have all the nutrients you need to get through the ride and hold you untill lunch.


    I didn't think eggs often was very good for you?

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  • DasUberEdwardDasUberEdward Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Considering how much riding you'll be doing I don't think the eggs will be terrible for you. Personally i'd go for grilled chicken with eggs for breakfast. Throw in a fruit or veggie of your choice and orange juice (not from concentrate). That should power you up just fine, you can either by the previously prepared chicken breast or just grill it up in advance. So basically you can make scrambled eggs an omelet or whatever type of egg you prefer with healthy and delicious chicken breast as your meat.

    Throw in toast as you'd like and you'll basically have a damn healthy breakfast. It's what I ate when I had to drop weight classes and it worked pretty well for me with a good amount of activity in my day.

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  • Fizban140Fizban140 Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    Just eat once you get to school that way it doesn't really matter what you eat.

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  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Fizban140 wrote: »
    Just eat once you get to school that way it doesn't really matter what you eat.
    Getting up and immediately riding 12 miles without having had anything to eat or drink in the past eight hours is what we call a "bad idea."

    Thanatos on
  • EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    weetbix.jpg

    That or your equivelant.

    3 or 4, more if you can, fill it halfway with milk and wack some honey on there.

    Then eat.


    Where do I get these, what are they made of and what do they taste like? Are they like the old school mini wheats?

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  • Logan's HeroesLogan's Heroes Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Ugh... going to school and getting there with major case of sweat and swamp ass...


    Don't sit near the hotties.


    Personally, I'm a big fan of the nature valley bars and vitamin water. There's a sweet and salty peanut bar that they make that gives me some energy and isn't bad on protein to boot. They're probably not the best thing though, that's for sure. I'm horrible with breakfast. I would say, as was mentioned earlier, that a bagel with cream cheese and a good helping of juice should hold you over really well.

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  • EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    I really like Vitamin water might have to pick a ton up at sams but is it as good or better then water? I know some people get carried away with GatorAde thinking it is good for you but it has tons of sugar and water is just as good. Don't really know the specs on Vitamin Water.

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  • saltinesssaltiness Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Remember to bring some good-smelling deodorant with you to school. I ride my bike to school a few times a week in San Francisco. I only go about 4.5 miles each way but there are a lot of hills. I get pretty sweaty but I bring an extra shirt and a stick of old spice deodorant to throw on when I get to school. It takes care of the stinks. Honestly though, most people don't care here, they see that I rode my bike and they appreciate the fact that I'm saving gas and staying in good shape so being a little smelly doesn't matter.

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  • Dark MoonDark Moon Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    EliteLamer wrote: »
    supabeast wrote: »
    Fifteen minutes is ample time to scramble three or four eggs and make two slices of whole-wheat toast. Throw in a banana spoonful of peanut butter and you’ll have all the nutrients you need to get through the ride and hold you untill lunch.


    I didn't think eggs often was very good for you?

    They're one of the healthiest things you can eat for breakfast. Just don't scramble them in reams of butter - that's what makes them unhealthy. If you scramble them with just a little pan lubricant or boil them, they're pretty much the best thing you can eat for breakfast.

    Don't listen to Not Sarastro. You should not be eating a small breakfast. It is by far the most important meal of the day, and should be your largest. Eggs, whole wheat toast and some fruit is an excellent breakfast. A good breakfast in the morning gets your metabolism going and will cause you to burn far more calories than if you don't eat breakfast.

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  • Fizban140Fizban140 Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    Thinatos wrote: »
    Fizban140 wrote: »
    Just eat once you get to school that way it doesn't really matter what you eat.
    Getting up and immediately riding 12 miles without having had anything to eat or drink in the past eight hours is what we call a "bad idea."
    Riding 12 miles isn't that bad, I have ran 5 or so miles right after waking up. Is there any real problem with doing it?

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  • ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    EliteLamer wrote: »
    weetbix.jpg

    That or your equivelant.

    3 or 4, more if you can, fill it halfway with milk and wack some honey on there.

    Then eat.
    Where do I get these, what are they made of and what do they taste like? Are they like the old school mini wheats?
    You get them in places that aren't the North American continent.

    Thanatos on
  • EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    Thinatos wrote: »
    EliteLamer wrote: »
    weetbix.jpg

    That or your equivelant.

    3 or 4, more if you can, fill it halfway with milk and wack some honey on there.

    Then eat.
    Where do I get these, what are they made of and what do they taste like? Are they like the old school mini wheats?
    You get them in places that aren't the North American continent.

    That makes it kinda hard.

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  • EggyToastEggyToast Jersey CityRegistered User regular
    edited December 2007
    They sell Weetabix in the US; I get them at Trader Joes and have seen them at Whole Foods. They're amazingly bland, though, and IMO don't qualify at all as "fast."

    Also, you need to realize that consuming calories before expending a great amount of energy is a very good thing. Athletes eat huge meals of pasta and other carbs before an event to keep their energy levels up. And whenever I go on long rides (20+ miles), I always have a very carb-oriented breakfast with some meats in there for my muscles. If I wake up and just go, without eating anything, even my short rides (2 miles to work) are more painful, and my legs get sore sooner.

    Gatorade is actually better for you than water if you're an athlete (it hydrates you very well). Vitamin water is worse than a glass of water and a multivitamin. If you're going to try to eat a very calorie light breakfast and then bike for 12 miles, I'd seriously suggest you get a calorie calculator and figure out how much you're going to burn, and use that as a guide for how much you need to eat. If your body is burning through its store of calories in the first 5 miles, those last 7 miles are going to be pretty much metabolizing muscle, and not fat, because it metabolizes faster. That, with the buildup of lactic acid, means that after the first day, you'll be in such pain you won't be able to ride to class.

    You're essentially going to be training for "touring" and should adopt a similar eating schedule. If you're working out that much, you'll naturally lose the fat unless you're eating mcdonalds everyday.

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  • Not SarastroNot Sarastro __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    Yeees, in response to Dark Moon etc, I've spent plenty of days in my life eating sub-2500 calories per day (that would be a good 1000 less than the RDA for high exercise), sleeping a couple of hours and doing a lot of running around carrying heavy things. I can pretty much guarantee that having a light breakfast is not going to kill you, harm you or prevent you from riding your 12 miles unless they are up a very steep mountain (not too many of those in Florida I believe). I can also guarantee you that the equation I posted before for losing weight is correct, though anyone else is free to disagree with: eat the same + more exercise = lose weight. This does not mean starve yourself, but it does mean be wary that you may compensate for the extra stuff you are burning off by eating more, and a changed breakfast would be a prime candidate for that.

    In other news:
    Athletes eat huge meals of pasta and other carbs before an event to keep their energy levels up.

    But not before their everyday training routine, which is what we're talking about here. They have a carefully balanced amount of food that they take in to contrast their calculated expenditure.
    Gatorade is actually better for you than water if you're an athlete (it hydrates you very well)

    Just bollocks. The extra sugar just gives you an early boost then leaves you drained. If you are drinking it during a race / training, then you are just sticking sugar straight into your system when what you want is water. This leads to dehydration and the sugar boosts aren't good for you. I don't know any athletes who drink Gatorade before or during exercise, it's a fucking marketing gimmick.

    Also, just in case anyone missed it: water fucking hydrates you. Gatorade = less water & more sugar (which dehydrates you, less than salt but nonetheless), how does that help you exactly? Fucks sake.
    That, with the buildup of lactic acid, means that after the first day, you'll be in such pain you won't be able to ride to class.

    Again, rubbish. Whatever you eat/drink, after the first day of new exercise, you're going to ache. You work through it slowly, and it goes away. There is no magical formula to persuade your muscles that this new exercise isn't new and exercise, and therefore causes aches.

    Also, I don't know what bizarre world EggyToast lives in, but 24 miles a day on a bike is not touring, it's a commute. Tourers would knock out 24 miles in an hour or so.
    Fizban140 wrote:
    Riding 12 miles isn't that bad, I have ran 5 or so miles right after waking up. Is there any real problem with doing it?

    Finally, some sense. As long as you aren't desperately unfit, you can get up and ride 12 miles without eating any day of the week, and it isn't going to hurt you (I do pretty much that most days), though I wouldn't recommend it (you probably won't go very fast & would do better by having a small breakfast). That isn't to say that you won't initially be hungry & notice a difference, but if you want to start a new exercise regime & lose weight, well, isn't that rather what you'd expect?

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  • DJ-99DJ-99 Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Gatorade is actually better for you than water if you're an athlete (it hydrates you very well)

    Just bollocks. The extra sugar just gives you an early boost then leaves you drained. If you are drinking it during a race / training, then you are just sticking sugar straight into your system when what you want is water. This leads to dehydration and the sugar boosts aren't good for you. I don't know any athletes who drink Gatorade before or during exercise, it's a fucking marketing gimmick.

    Also, just in case anyone missed it: water fucking hydrates you. Gatorade = less water & more sugar (which dehydrates you, less than salt but nonetheless), how does that help you exactly? Fucks sake.

    You clearly don't know many athletes. At least not many who work out for extended periods of time. While you're correct that water hydrates you (obviously) and that Gatorade has less water (also pretty obvious), that doesn't mean you shouldn't drink Gatorade. You also seem to think that consuming salt is bad for performance. For performance you need things that water can't provide. Marathoners drink Gatorade during a race, because without the electrolytes your body shuts down. Usually, you can get electrolytes from your meals, but you can't do that during a sporting event.

    Athletes put extra salt on their food during intense training times because they need to keep their bodies in prime shape, and you can't get salt from water. Water is important, but it's certainly not the only thing that matters to an athlete.

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  • Dark MoonDark Moon Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    Yeees, in response to Dark Moon etc, I've spent plenty of days in my life eating sub-2500 calories per day (that would be a good 1000 less than the RDA for high exercise), sleeping a couple of hours and doing a lot of running around carrying heavy things. I can pretty much guarantee that having a light breakfast is not going to kill you, harm you or prevent you from riding your 12 miles unless they are up a very steep mountain (not too many of those in Florida I believe). I can also guarantee you that the equation I posted before for losing weight is correct, though anyone else is free to disagree with: eat the same + more exercise = lose weight. This does not mean starve yourself, but it does mean be wary that you may compensate for the extra stuff you are burning off by eating more, and a changed breakfast would be a prime candidate for that.

    Groovy, but you're not burning fat when you're exercising without a proper size breakfast. As soon as you burn through any energy readily available in the food you just consumed, you're going to be off to the next most readily available source - muscle tissue. Sure, you'll lose plenty of weight, but it'll be the wrong kind of weight. "Losing weight" overall is a dumb goal. "Losing fat" is good, as is "Gaining muscle," but these two together do not end in overall body weight loss if you're doing it right, especially when first beginning.
    Gatorade is actually better for you than water if you're an athlete (it hydrates you very well)

    Just bollocks. The extra sugar just gives you an early boost then leaves you drained. If you are drinking it during a race / training, then you are just sticking sugar straight into your system when what you want is water. This leads to dehydration and the sugar boosts aren't good for you. I don't know any athletes who drink Gatorade before or during exercise, it's a fucking marketing gimmick.

    Also, just in case anyone missed it: water fucking hydrates you. Gatorade = less water & more sugar (which dehydrates you, less than salt but nonetheless), how does that help you exactly? Fucks sake.

    I had something similar to what DJ-99 has written here, but he beat me to it, so I'll just back up DJ-99 by saying he's completely correct.
    That, with the buildup of lactic acid, means that after the first day, you'll be in such pain you won't be able to ride to class.

    Again, rubbish. Whatever you eat/drink, after the first day of new exercise, you're going to ache. You work through it slowly, and it goes away. There is no magical formula to persuade your muscles that this new exercise isn't new and exercise, and therefore causes aches.

    Yup. What you eat will not affect lactic acid build up in you muscles. It's caused when you can't deliver oxygen quickly enough to your muscles, which triggers them to begin using primarily anaerobic energy production (the normal, most efficient kind of energy production is an aerobic process). This anaerobic process' byproduct is lactic acid, which will build up on your muscles and slowly be taken away by your blood. As you grow more fit, you'll become more efficient at delivering oxygen to your muscles, which means less anaerobic energy production and so less lactic acid.
    Fizban140 wrote:
    Riding 12 miles isn't that bad, I have ran 5 or so miles right after waking up. Is there any real problem with doing it?

    Finally, some sense. As long as you aren't desperately unfit, you can get up and ride 12 miles without eating any day of the week, and it isn't going to hurt you (I do pretty much that most days), though I wouldn't recommend it (you probably won't go very fast & would do better by having a small breakfast). That isn't to say that you won't initially be hungry & notice a difference, but if you want to start a new exercise regime & lose weight, well, isn't that rather what you'd expect?

    No, it won't hurt you, but eating a small breakfast is still a bad idea. Even if, for some silly reason, you decide to eat below maintenance calories for your current exercise regime, a good majority of those calories should still be consumed at breakfast. Which means a big breakfast. So eat a big breakfast.

    Dark Moon on
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  • The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2007
    DJ-99 wrote: »
    Gatorade is actually better for you than water if you're an athlete (it hydrates you very well)
    Just bollocks. The extra sugar just gives you an early boost then leaves you drained. If you are drinking it during a race / training, then you are just sticking sugar straight into your system when what you want is water. This leads to dehydration and the sugar boosts aren't good for you. I don't know any athletes who drink Gatorade before or during exercise, it's a fucking marketing gimmick.

    Also, just in case anyone missed it: water fucking hydrates you. Gatorade = less water & more sugar (which dehydrates you, less than salt but nonetheless), how does that help you exactly? Fucks sake.

    You clearly don't know many athletes. At least not many who work out for extended periods of time. While you're correct that water hydrates you (obviously) and that Gatorade has less water (also pretty obvious), that doesn't mean you shouldn't drink Gatorade. You also seem to think that consuming salt is bad for performance. For performance you need things that water can't provide. Marathoners drink Gatorade during a race, because without the electrolytes your body shuts down. Usually, you can get electrolytes from your meals, but you can't do that during a sporting event.

    Athletes put extra salt on their food during intense training times because they need to keep their bodies in prime shape, and you can't get salt from water. Water is important, but it's certainly not the only thing that matters to an athlete.

    None of that changes the fact that the OP is not an athlete. PSA, people: riding your bike to school does not make you an athlete. Working out on a regular basis does not make you an athlete. If you're not in a competition on a regular basis, you don't need the myriad stupid supplements that are sold to people on the lie that moderate physical activity is somehow horribly taxing on the body. Your body is adapted to work a lot harder than you think, and the only reason it seems like you're pushing yourself during these kinds of activites is that modern life involves a crazy amount of sitting around doing nothing. The only time you should need gatorade at all, even watered down, is if you're spending 4-6 hours plus a day in the heat doing hard physical work. A commute or workout does not meet this requirement.

    The Cat on
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  • EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    I have talked to a ton of people who cycle and almost none of them drink Gatorade. Some do but only if they are going to ride for hours on end.

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  • Not SarastroNot Sarastro __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    DJ-99 wrote: »
    You clearly don't know many athletes. At least not many who work out for extended periods of time. While you're correct that water hydrates you (obviously) and that Gatorade has less water (also pretty obvious), that doesn't mean you shouldn't drink Gatorade. You also seem to think that consuming salt is bad for performance. For performance you need things that water can't provide. Marathoners drink Gatorade during a race, because without the electrolytes your body shuts down. Usually, you can get electrolytes from your meals, but you can't do that during a sporting event.

    Athletes put extra salt on their food during intense training times because they need to keep their bodies in prime shape, and you can't get salt from water. Water is important, but it's certainly not the only thing that matters to an athlete.

    Yes, key point being (which is why I specifically eliminated it in my previous post) afterwards. Don't drink it before or during. Show me these marathon runners who drink Gatorade during races please, because every coach & athlete I've known say you take the energy/salt drinks afterwards, but never before, and only very specialised stuff during, and only for extreme endurance to replace salts - which, lest it need to be said, != fucking Gatorade. 12 miles is not extreme endurance. The guy said he was planning on 30-45 minutes. Comparatively that's a fucking warmup.

    Oh, Cat got there before me.
    The only time you should need gatorade at all, even watered down, is if you're spending 4-6 hours plus a day in the heat doing hard physical work. A commute or workout does not meet this requirement.

    Thank you. As a tip, when you find yourself habitually licking the sweat from your face, then you probably need sports drinks.

    Dark Moon: I've seen this stuff about eating muscle quoted here a lot. I'm not a nutritionist or sports science guy, but I've done a fair amount of this stuff under pretty harsh conditions, eating less than the recommended amount (certainly a lot worse than cycling for an hour and a half), and neither I or any of my mates turned into concentration camp victims.

    I'm pretty sure it is being totally overstated here, and he isn't in any danger of losing any amount of muscle from cycling 24 miles a day, so long as he does the occasional pressup or two & doesn't let particular muscles atrophy. In fact, judging from when I started cycling ages back (doing 200-250 miles a week), I'll bet he gains a stone or two in quad & calf muscles.

    My problem with the advice in this thread is that it seems to be dealing out overstated principles that might possibly apply to top athletes trying to achieve tiny performance or body improvements, but has fuck all to do with a bloke cycling to and from school. It's needlessly complex. Whether it's breakfast or not, eat the same, exercise more = win.

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  • RegrettableRegrettable Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I ride a similar distance to and from school and I'll just say that a cup of black tea and some baked beans on toast is perfectly adequate. 12 miles is not very far at all, and as long as your route is fairly simple it shouldn't take any longer than 45 minutes of pretty cruisy riding, which means there is no reason to significantly alter your breakfast routine on the grounds of increasing your energy supplies or electrolyte replenishment or whatever.

    Regrettable on
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  • EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    I think I am going to go with this..

    Life Cereral
    1 over easy egg
    1 toast
    Some pinepple or grapefruit
    And 1 cup of OJ


    I think I will feel much better on that then compared to just Life.

    EliteLamer on
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  • EliteLamerEliteLamer __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    Not Sarastro I will be riding about 116 miles a week do you think just from that I will see weight loss? I have never ate like a fat ass at all I just had a few summers where I sat around and played video games.

    EliteLamer on
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  • The CatThe Cat Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2007
    My problem with the advice in this thread is that it seems to be dealing out overstated principles that might possibly apply to top athletes trying to achieve tiny performance or body improvements, but has fuck all to do with a bloke cycling to and from school. It's needlessly complex. Whether it's breakfast or not, eat the same, exercise more = win.


    Guess why I ignore 90% of the fitness thread these days...

    The Cat on
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  • DJ-99DJ-99 Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    DJ-99 wrote: »
    You clearly don't know many athletes. At least not many who work out for extended periods of time. While you're correct that water hydrates you (obviously) and that Gatorade has less water (also pretty obvious), that doesn't mean you shouldn't drink Gatorade. You also seem to think that consuming salt is bad for performance. For performance you need things that water can't provide. Marathoners drink Gatorade during a race, because without the electrolytes your body shuts down. Usually, you can get electrolytes from your meals, but you can't do that during a sporting event.

    Athletes put extra salt on their food during intense training times because they need to keep their bodies in prime shape, and you can't get salt from water. Water is important, but it's certainly not the only thing that matters to an athlete.

    Yes, key point being (which is why I specifically eliminated it in my previous post) afterwards. Don't drink it before or during. Show me these marathon runners who drink Gatorade during races please, because every coach & athlete I've known say you take the energy/salt drinks afterwards, but never before, and only very specialised stuff during, and only for extreme endurance to replace salts - which, lest it need to be said, != fucking Gatorade. 12 miles is not extreme endurance. The guy said he was planning on 30-45 minutes. Comparatively that's a fucking warmup.

    Well, actually you do need to drink/eat salts before/during the event, because during the event is when you need them. If you do it after, that's all great too, but it didn't help your performance during the race/game/whatever.

    Anyways, you're right in that biking 12 miles isn't as intense as being a serious athlete, but I simply pointed out what I did because you specifically said "athlete". I still stand by that, because I know plenty of distance runners, pro athletes, and NFL trainers who all agree that Gatorade is the way to go, and in my personal experience it's been very helpful. Also, drinking a couple beers the night before a marathon is good, too (yet another example of how hydration is not everything). Sorry I can't "show" you any marathoners, but I promise you I know plenty.

    But I DO agree with you that for biking 12 miles it's probably not necessary, I just wanted to point out that the issue is not so black and white. So you're right in that regard, but I still say that my advice is apt for serious athletes.

    DJ-99 on
  • Dark MoonDark Moon Registered User regular
    edited December 2007
    I'm just trying to give a "best possible" suggestion. I agree that you won't see a big loss of performance or muscle or what have you if you don't eat an ideal breakfast. It's just good to know that, if you have the time and the resources handy, what an ideal breakfast would be so you can have it or as near it as possible as often as possible. Doing so will result in you seeing the best possible results, which he naturally wants to see.

    I'm also personally a big fan of large breakfasts, think they are the most lovely way to start the day, and feel that everyone should try them so they too can experience the joy that is three eggs, a bunch of toast, some fruit and a bowl of delicious cereal at the beginning of their day. Mornings are so much less of a chore when you're nice and plump with morning food.

    Dark Moon on
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  • ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    Sausage or salami omlette. (15 minutes)

    Hard-boiled eggs and cereal with slices of fruit in it. (10 minutes)

    2 Slices of whole wheat bread with natural peanut butter and honey. (5 minutes)

    Protein bar, apple or banana, pint of milk. (2 minutes)

    --

    Also, I recommend coffee if you have time to make it, or to stop by a coffee shop on the way.

    ege02 on
  • Not SarastroNot Sarastro __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    EliteLamer wrote: »
    Not Sarastro I will be riding about 116 miles a week do you think just from that I will see weight loss? I have never ate like a fat ass at all I just had a few summers where I sat around and played video games.

    You should see fat loss, but I'm not sure about weight loss - if you haven't cycled much, you'll put on leg muscle within a few months, and being the largest muscles in the body, that can mean a couple of stone. Should get less fat, more muscle though. If you want to maximise the fat loss, make sure that you really push yourself on one commute (the ride home presumably, or you'll end up looking unpleasant at school).

    Also, don't go straight into 24 miles a day if you haven't been cycling much or at all. Take at least a couple of weeks to work it up to that distance, or you'll likely pull something and set yourself back.

    DarkMoon & DJ: It's just needlessly complex like I said. So much fitness advice is needlessly complex that it just puts up more barriers to people actually getting out there and doing it, so in my opinion the best advice is often the simplest & tailored to the actual situation. Also, large breakfasts might be nice, but not if you're exercising straight afterwards, and beers before a marathon? I'm all for 'get totally pissed then tab 10 miles' as a man-test, but I don't see it actually improving your performance O_o
    The Cat wrote:
    Guess why I ignore 90% of the fitness thread these days...

    Yeah, I looked in there once, then figured I'd just get infracted if I joined in and left.

    Not Sarastro on
  • LondonBridgeLondonBridge __BANNED USERS regular
    edited December 2007
    I wouldn't suggest bacon or sausage suggest as burping that stuff up during cardio is nasty. Happened a lot to me in USCG boot camp as we ate breakfast before physical training.

    LondonBridge on
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