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Out of State Jobs

ArsonistArsonist Registered User regular
edited January 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
First post to the forums so I do apologize to begin with. It is much easier to read and not respond. And here is hoping no one does this to my thread.

Anyhow. My dilemma. I am a beginner in the I.T field. Hopefully, to these also in the field, this issue may already be obvious (can be rough times to begin). To compound this issue, I live in Buttfuck, Alabama, working for a small privately owned company who cares not one iota for their employees. I work for this group of neanderthals in suits due to lack of options. I am in a small population that relates Information Technology to being the fancy new signs they just installed at the local Sonic fast-food restaurant.

Now on to my hope - A comparable, if not better job, out of state. In a city that you can actually see on a U.S. Map.

So I am hoping that someone has done this before and can offer some advice, how do you get a job in another state when you are at fairly entry-level point in your life? The three potential employers I have spoken to some serious extent with have all practically cackled in my face at the idea of hiring for my position, only to wait the week or more for me to relocate myself and all of my random shit a few hundred miles.

Are we all forced to become specialists in a given field where we are born before we can attempt to seal positions that are outside walking distance?

Arsonist on

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    KhavallKhavall British ColumbiaRegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    As a general rule, you have to move where the industry is to get jobs.

    Yeah, you'll have some startup costs that you'll need to find a way to cover when you first move in some place and don't have a job yet, but you'll be much more likely to get jobs.

    Khavall on
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    ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited January 2008
    ege02 on
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    BlochWaveBlochWave Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    So I am hoping that someone has done this before and can offer some advice, how do you get a job in another state when you are at fairly entry-level point in your life? The three potential employers I have spoken to some serious extent with have all practically cackled in my face at the idea of hiring for my position, only to wait the week or more for me to relocate myself and all of my random shit a few hundred miles.

    Well that's just bad, my first job outta college I moved and their offer letter had me starting two months later, I had to call and ask to start earlier, and I got 1500 dollars in relocation expenses(well I was reimbursed for up to 1500 dollars)

    BlochWave on
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    ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Arsonist wrote: »
    First post to the forums so I do apologize to begin with. It is much easier to read and not respond. And here is hoping no one does this to my thread.

    Anyhow. My dilemma. I am a beginner in the I.T field. Hopefully, to these also in the field, this issue may already be obvious (can be rough times to begin). To compound this issue, I live in Buttfuck, Alabama, working for a small privately owned company who cares not one iota for their employees. I work for this group of neanderthals in suits due to lack of options. I am in a small population that relates Information Technology to being the fancy new signs they just installed at the local Sonic fast-food restaurant.

    Now on to my hope - A comparable, if not better job, out of state. In a city that you can actually see on a U.S. Map.

    So I am hoping that someone has done this before and can offer some advice, how do you get a job in another state when you are at fairly entry-level point in your life? The three potential employers I have spoken to some serious extent with have all practically cackled in my face at the idea of hiring for my position, only to wait the week or more for me to relocate myself and all of my random shit a few hundred miles.

    Are we all forced to become specialists in a given field where we are born before we can attempt to seal positions that are outside walking distance?
    You are essentially where I was six months ago right before I decided to move to Seattle (only I liked my job, and was in Buttfuck, California instead of Alabama). Here's what I would recommend: Stick with the job you've got until you've got several months worth of expenses saved up. Personally, I had about $8,000 in the bank before I moved to Seattle (which has a low cost-of-living for a coastal state) and ended up very glad I did. It was probably overkill, but it allowed me to be picky about the job I wanted.

    If you're looking for an entry-level job, one of your biggest assets is the ability to start immediately, so you're going to have to start looking after you move. This has the advantage of being able to pick where you want to go instead of having it picked for you. Research cities while you're saving up your cushion, and see where you like that has a good job market. I ended up up here because I had a college friend who was moving here, and asked if he wanted a roommate. Sometimes, things like that just fall in your lap.

    Once you get to where you want to be, start applying all over the place, including every staffing agency you can find (I start my one-year temp-to-hire Project Manager position next Wednesday thanks to a staffing agency). Take temp jobs to help pay the bills while you're job-hunting (I'm assuming you can type fast and use Microsoft Office). The bigger your financial cushion, the pickier you can afford to be about the job you take.

    Also, those small towns tend to be black holes, so congratulations on trying to get the fuck out. I know how tough it can be, but I know it was the best decision I ever made. Something else to keep in mind is that you're going to run into a lot more diversity of opinion and culture no matter where you go (frankly, it doesn't get much more homogeneous than small-town Alabama), so make sure you keep an open mind.

    Thanatos on
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