As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/
Options

New computer running hot

Caliban42Caliban42 Registered User regular
edited January 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
I just got done building a new PC and am having some problems with the processor temperature. I used an Intel Core 2 Quad processor and there's an Nvidia 8600 video card. I used the heatsink/fan that came with the processor and made sure to apply some thermal paste. The heatsink is also seated properly and isn't loose. There is a fan on the back of the case and a vent in the side that has a tube that's pointed directly at the processor. There's no fan in the vent.

The Intel desktop utility that came with the motherboard keeps giving an error saying the processor is getting too hot. Using the SpeedFan program, with nothing running the processor temp is 46/46/47/50 (for each of the cores). If I do anything more than web browsing, I get the error message. For example, if I start the Folding @ Home client, the temp quickly goes up to 72/80/77/82. It isn't just folding that does it, even iTunes gives the error. To contrast this, my old computer never had any problems folding and doing other things at the same time.

The only other thing I noticed that's odd is the rear fan. It has an LED built in and sometimes the light shows solid and sometimes it kind of strobes, which seems like the fan isn't always running at the right speed.

So, does anyone have any ideas how I can fix this?

Caliban42 on

Posts

  • Options
    TychoCelchuuuTychoCelchuuu PIGEON Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    You might want to the thermal paste off with isopropyl and reapply it, because you probably have too much: the stock heatsink for Intel processors comes with a thermal pad already applied. It's possible that the excess goop is just screwing with the heat transfer.

    Also, are you sure it's spinning? Take the side of teh case off while it's running and make sure the heatsink fan is working.

    TychoCelchuuu on
  • Options
    Caliban42Caliban42 Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    I've just got a very thin layer of paste applied. Originally I didn't use any paste because of the stuff on the bottom of the heatsink. So when I first noticed the problem, I wiped it all off and applied some more. And I did take the side off the case while it was turned on to make sure all the fans were spinning. But is it normal for the rear fan to be a variable speed? Since I've never had one with an LED before, I've never noticed.

    Caliban42 on
  • Options
    AresProphetAresProphet Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Caliban42 wrote: »
    I've just got a very thin layer of paste applied. Originally I didn't use any paste because of the stuff on the bottom of the heatsink. So when I first noticed the problem, I wiped it all off and applied some more. And I did take the side off the case while it was turned on to make sure all the fans were spinning. But is it normal for the rear fan to be a variable speed? Since I've never had one with an LED before, I've never noticed.

    Yeah, using thermal paste without removing the existing thermal pad on an Intel HSF is a big no-no. I know that common sense dictates "if one thermal paste is good two must be better!" but it doesn't work that way. The ideal heat transfer situation requires the thinnest possible layer of thermal compound between the HSF and the CPU die, adding more stuff just makes it thicker and ruins heat transfer.

    What you need to do is unseat the HSF, thoroughly clean the heatsink surface and the CPU surface with rubbing alcohol (some people recommend a light brushing with 3000grit sandpaper to get it perfectly clean, but this is a good way to make things much worse if you don't do it right), and reseat the HSF with a proper amount of thermal paste. If you don't apply it properly you'll screw up the heat transfer again, so make sure you use the right amount (about the size of a grain of rice) and apply it correctly (I usually just seat the heatsink directly on the blob, the pressure spreads it out just fine. You can use the edge of a credit card to smear it over the CPU die, too).

    Remember that the role of thermal grease is not to create a layer between the heatsink and the CPU, it's to fill the microscopic grooves and scratches on the aluminum surfaces and create a perfect seal between the two components so that there's no air to insulate between them. Aluminum itself is more conductive than thermal grease, so you want as little paste as possible between the two aluminum parts, but you will notice an increase by using it (properly) because it fills those little spaces between the metal.

    If you're still having heat issues after reseating the heatsink correctly it could be fans, but you'll want to check the temps on other parts first: if it's just the CPU then it's an issue with the CPU/HSF itself, not case fans, but if the GPU and the mobo sensors are showing high temps ("high" will vary; my 8800 runs at 70+ under load and that's normal with my clock speeds, while a stock 8600 will still probably hit 60+) then it may br a fan/airflow problem.

    Honestly though, fif your case fans are running then they're probably fine, the biggest problem with case temps is airflow. Too many power cables blocking airflow, improperly-installed fans (intake in the front/lower part of the case, exhaust in the back/top/sides), or something else that's keeping cool air coming in and hot air going out. This is trickier to diagnose.

    AresProphet on
    ex9pxyqoxf6e.png
Sign In or Register to comment.