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What does HD-Ready mean on my TV?

quaker0quaker0 Registered User regular
edited January 2008 in Games and Technology
Ok, I was given a flatscreen (not flat panel) 32" Sony Trinitron HD-Ready television.

It accepts and uses the 480p signal from my PC's video card (S-Video) and looks very nice while doing so. The TV has S-Video, Component, and RCA inputs.

My question is, what does HD-Ready even mean? Will it display 720 and 1080 at those resolutions and look awesome doing it? I realize this will mean upgrading to a component display setup, as S-Video is limited to 480p. I'm looking for a DVI to Component converter now, but Fry's is sold out in the entire Los Angeles area, so I have to go online.


tl;dr - Is it an HD TV or what? I'm so confused.

quaker0 on

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    Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Ho Ho Ho Disconnecting from Xbox LIVERegistered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Unless the TV has a VGA input, I'm tempted to say that it might not display higher than 480p. It could go as high as 720p maybe. I suggest you use the model number and check with the manufacturer's support site for more concrete information.

    Santa Claustrophobia on
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    scootchscootch Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    it means it goes up to 1080i and have either dvi or hdmi capable of DRM.

    scootch on
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    Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
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    slash000slash000 Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    In the USA, "HD Ready" refers to any display that is capable of accepting and displaying a high-definition signal at either 720p, 1080i or 1080p using a component video or digital input, and does not have a built-in HD-capable tuner.

    That last bit is the main reason why it's called "HD-Ready" in the USA. It's capable of hi-def resolution and even has inputs for it. But these TVs typically do not come with HD tuners.


    Most HDTVs on the market nowadays come with the tuners built-in. But back when HD tvs were relatively new, you'd be saving yourself a couple o' hundred bucks by getting an "HD Ready" tv as opposed to an "HDTV" that actually included an HD tuner.

    slash000 on
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    quaker0quaker0 Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    slash000 wrote: »
    In the USA, "HD Ready" refers to any display that is capable of accepting and displaying a high-definition signal at either 720p, 1080i or 1080p using a component video or digital input, and does not have a built-in HD-capable tuner.

    That last bit is the main reason why it's called "HD-Ready" in the USA. It's capable of hi-def resolution and even has inputs for it. But these TVs typically do not come with HD tuners.


    Most HDTVs on the market nowadays come with the tuners built-in. But back when HD tvs were relatively new, you'd be saving yourself a couple o' hundred bucks by getting an "HD Ready" tv as opposed to an "HDTV" that actually included an HD tuner.



    So... what does an HD Tuner do?

    quaker0 on
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    shrykeshryke Member of the Beast Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    Tunes your HD obviously.

    If your HD isn't tuned properly? Oh boy.

    shryke on
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    meatflowermeatflower Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    quaker0 wrote: »
    slash000 wrote: »
    In the USA, "HD Ready" refers to any display that is capable of accepting and displaying a high-definition signal at either 720p, 1080i or 1080p using a component video or digital input, and does not have a built-in HD-capable tuner.

    That last bit is the main reason why it's called "HD-Ready" in the USA. It's capable of hi-def resolution and even has inputs for it. But these TVs typically do not come with HD tuners.


    Most HDTVs on the market nowadays come with the tuners built-in. But back when HD tvs were relatively new, you'd be saving yourself a couple o' hundred bucks by getting an "HD Ready" tv as opposed to an "HDTV" that actually included an HD tuner.



    So... what does an HD Tuner do?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atsc_tuner

    Read.

    meatflower on
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    slash000slash000 Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    quaker0 wrote: »
    slash000 wrote: »
    In the USA, "HD Ready" refers to any display that is capable of accepting and displaying a high-definition signal at either 720p, 1080i or 1080p using a component video or digital input, and does not have a built-in HD-capable tuner.

    That last bit is the main reason why it's called "HD-Ready" in the USA. It's capable of hi-def resolution and even has inputs for it. But these TVs typically do not come with HD tuners.


    Most HDTVs on the market nowadays come with the tuners built-in. But back when HD tvs were relatively new, you'd be saving yourself a couple o' hundred bucks by getting an "HD Ready" tv as opposed to an "HDTV" that actually included an HD tuner.



    So... what does an HD Tuner do?



    It will receive high definition digital signals and display them on the screen.

    For example, most HDTVs that include tuners will allow you to hook up an antenna to it. Then you can receive HDTV over the air for free. In crystal clear digital HD quality.


    I think that it's possible that you could transmit digital HD signals over regular cable, but right now cable companies do not do this to my knowledge. They'd rather have you pay extra for "digital cable" and have a cable box. Which defeats the purpose of having an HD tuner in the first place.

    Some newish HDTVs come with 'cable cards' which are supposed to work with cable companies' services to basically do the same thing as digital cable boxes. But they are extremely finicky and depend on whether the cable service uses them.


    Ultimately, I consider HD tuners only useful in a practical sense if you are going to get HDTV over the air. For example, my friend pays $20 a month for regular cable. No hd channels. But if he wants to watch prime time TV in HD, he switches to his antenna. Boom. Crystal clear 1080i.

    slash000 on
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    FaceballMcDougalFaceballMcDougal Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
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    Dark ShroudDark Shroud Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    slash000 wrote: »
    It will receive high definition digital signals and display them on the screen.

    For example, most HDTVs that include tuners will allow you to hook up an antenna to it. Then you can receive HDTV over the air for free. In crystal clear digital HD quality.


    I think that it's possible that you could transmit digital HD signals over regular cable, but right now cable companies do not do this to my knowledge. They'd rather have you pay extra for "digital cable" and have a cable box. Which defeats the purpose of having an HD tuner in the first place.

    Some newish HDTVs come with 'cable cards' which are supposed to work with cable companies' services to basically do the same thing as digital cable boxes. But they are extremely finicky and depend on whether the cable service uses them.


    Ultimately, I consider HD tuners only useful in a practical sense if you are going to get HDTV over the air. For example, my friend pays $20 a month for regular cable. No hd channels. But if he wants to watch prime time TV in HD, he switches to his antenna. Boom. Crystal clear 1080i.

    This is very correct. I have a 32" HDTV that needs some type of receiver box. Stores like Best Buy refer to this (or used to) as HD capable. If I put an HD antenna on my roof I wouldn't be able to receive them. My sister's on the other hand has a tuner built in. I believe DirectTV sends the HD signal for channels, they boast about it on their advertising and have already been sued by Time Warner. Time Warner lost the case, thus why Comcast only boasts about having more HD by counting their On Demand service (It stinks in quality).

    Dark Shroud on
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    FaceballMcDougalFaceballMcDougal Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    To be fair nobody's HD broadcast looks like what it should be unless it's something like Sunrise Earth that doesn't move very fast.

    Some providers even take the MPEG4 local stuff and compress it down making it look crappier than if you just used a regular antenna.

    FaceballMcDougal on
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    LovingFFXILovingFFXI Registered User regular
    edited January 2008
    slash000 wrote: »
    It will receive high definition digital signals and display them on the screen.

    For example, most HDTVs that include tuners will allow you to hook up an antenna to it. Then you can receive HDTV over the air for free. In crystal clear digital HD quality.


    I think that it's possible that you could transmit digital HD signals over regular cable, but right now cable companies do not do this to my knowledge. They'd rather have you pay extra for "digital cable" and have a cable box. Which defeats the purpose of having an HD tuner in the first place.

    Some newish HDTVs come with 'cable cards' which are supposed to work with cable companies' services to basically do the same thing as digital cable boxes. But they are extremely finicky and depend on whether the cable service uses them.


    Ultimately, I consider HD tuners only useful in a practical sense if you are going to get HDTV over the air. For example, my friend pays $20 a month for regular cable. No hd channels. But if he wants to watch prime time TV in HD, he switches to his antenna. Boom. Crystal clear 1080i.

    This is very correct. I have a 32" HDTV that needs some type of receiver box. Stores like Best Buy refer to this (or used to) as HD capable. If I put an HD antenna on my roof I wouldn't be able to receive them. My sister's on the other hand has a tuner built in. I believe DirectTV sends the HD signal for channels, they boast about it on their advertising and have already been sued by Time Warner. Time Warner lost the case, thus why Comcast only boasts about having more HD by counting their On Demand service (It stinks in quality).

    Comcast has free HD channels right now. You just need either a External QAM tuner or if your TV has a QAM tuner like mine. I have a 37" Vizio that I bought from Costco and I get at least 20 free HD channels and 40 or so music channels with my extened basic package. Now that I think about it my parents also get the same HD channels with just a basic cable package.

    LovingFFXI on
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