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FofamitFofamit Registered User regular
edited June 2019 in Help / Advice Forum
 

Fofamit on

Posts

  • DocDoc Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited March 2008
    I think you are freaking yourself out more than anything else.

    Do you have any anxiety issues?

    Doc on
  • AlpineAlpine Registered User regular
    edited March 2008
    How long after your accident did these problems surface?

    Alpine on
  • SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited March 2008
    Interesting.

    Some of these things do seem related to your accident - auditory processing, for example. Some others, a general lack of multilateral thinking for example, do not.

    Assuming no recreational drugs (one of your symptoms sounds like acid flashes, and all of your symptoms can be caused by constant drug use), it does seem you have some sort of processing impairment. Impossible to say if thats because of the accident though, because you might just have been built that way. The brain finalizes a lot of details between 15-19, so if you had your injury before that time, which I'm assuming you did, you would notice cognitive changes just as most introspectively curious people do.

    Thats just part of normal development though. See also, not everyone grows up to be a mathmatician.

    The one that strikes me as most relevant is the hearing thing. Hearing and language processing is directly tied to the function of memory. If you have issues accessing your youth memories, you are also going to have issues processing the language you hear. Its probably just a bottleneck rather than information loss- if you hear the same thing a couple times, you can make sense of it. This is very much like a learning disability, in that the reasoning and information centers are intact, but the absorbtion of stimuli is not as fast as the other centers of your brain, and the coordination of reciving this information is not happening as it should. This may in part be because the information that should be directly tied together no longer has those same direct neural strings as other nearby associations do, so that the information becomes mistimed. Quite often this is the result of physical trauma interrupting the links between specific associations while leaving others, close in terms of formation, neural matter proximity and experience type, unaffected. In simple terms, brain damage.

    There are some drugs that may help that specific issue, a neurologist and a psychiatrist (not a psychologist) would have a lot more to say about the matter.

    Sarcastro on
  • WillethWilleth Registered User regular
    edited March 2008
    Is there anything preventing you from going to a doctor other than feeling stupid? No doctor is going to look down on you/think you're weird when you express concern about any part of your health with legitimate cause, especially when you're worried about an issue with your brain and have a history of brain trauma.

    Willeth on
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  • oncelingonceling Registered User regular
    edited March 2008
    I do not have advice, but wanted to let you know that I experience the 'more 3D than usual' thing myself, and I don't have any history of brain injury. I would not bother pursuing treatment for that specifically, as it is perfectly normal, I've known a few people that have experienced it.

    No harm mentioning it if you are going in for the other issues, but just wanted to say you may always experience this. It happens more often to me when I'm at the computer, watching some kind of monitor, or watching something at a fixed distance (sports events or whatever).

    onceling on
  • FofamitFofamit Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
     

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  • DaenrisDaenris Registered User regular
    edited March 2008
    well... do you have a primary care doctor on your insurance? If so, you'll need to either see them or call them to get a referral to a neurologist. If not, you'll need to find a neurologist who's covered on your insurance and make an appointment.

    You pretty much never randomly walk into a hospital or doctor's office looking for a doctor (except for the emergency room of course).

    Daenris on
  • FofamitFofamit Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
     

    Fofamit on
  • FofamitFofamit Registered User regular
    edited June 2019
     

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  • SarcastroSarcastro Registered User regular
    edited March 2008
    Keep us informed. Inquiring minds want to know... ;)

    Sarcastro on
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