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Need advice about my new job

HorusHorus Los AngelesRegistered User regular
edited April 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
Ok here is the deal, I got a web job but my background is print for three years. I learned web going to night school. I was very honest on my skills during the interview and still landed the job (passed the test for knowing essential HTML and PHP).

I take work home to learn more about it, yes I know its bad if they found out but I am at a disadvantage and do not want to appear as a lag in the company. I only have three weeks in the company so I am still in the nooby stage. I just want to get ready when my honeymoon ends and the big campaigns come and since I don't know how things are done ahead of time it really freaks me out.

I need tips, advice and recommendations that can range from how to handle a job that is drastically different from past jobs (almost career change), the do's and don'ts when you start a new job, recommendation of XHTML, CSS and PHP books, sites, and videos or tips on methodology (or how to think) when working in web.

Reason I post this is my way of thinking is I like to plan ahead just to get an idea and prepare myself. So I hope H/A is able to help me in my situation.

tl;dr I got a web job, coming from print background. I am freaking out I do not know anything or want to learn as much as possible so I won't look like an idiot in my job. I need advice ranging from starting a job in a new career, and tips/advice on web design.

thank you

“You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...”
― Dr. Seuss, Oh, the Places You'll Go!
Horus on

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    RoundBoyRoundBoy Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    What level of programming are you doing? I can't imagine its too high a level (API calls, flash, heavy dynamic scripting) otherwise you wouldn't have made it in the door...

    Google will be your best friend.. use it to find code examples for what you need to do.

    WC3.org -> is the HTML spec organization. They have pages to check your HTML code, make suggestions, and tell you what you need to include on every page. Seriously, I never memorize the meta headers, I just cut & paste.

    Get a color coded development enviornment. If you are using Dreamweaver, etc... it will write a bunch of code for you (I do NOT recommend this program).. i personally use textpad for all my coding. It will color code HTML and PHP.. Ultraedit is another nice one.

    PHP.net
    --> look at the example pages for what you are doing. The user contributed info is sometimes pretty valuable... if only for a 'works, but not the best way' type of situation.


    Seriously. Everyone googles. You will eventually learn it like the back of your hand.. but unless you do every day you won't remember mysql does vs mysqli

    RoundBoy on
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    Librarians harbor a terrible secret. Find it.
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    HorusHorus Los AngelesRegistered User regular
    edited April 2008
    Thats good advice, and I appreciate your post. I am basically just doing XHTML/CSS with very minor PHP which is like common sense I know how to mess with it. I just need to put effort in my personal time to help me with the job.

    Thanks for the resources, got any books? or magazines?

    Horus on
    “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose. You're on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the one who'll decide where to go...”
    ― Dr. Seuss, Oh, the Places You'll Go!
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    Shark_MegaByteShark_MegaByte Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    RoundBoy wrote: »

    Get a color coded development enviornment. If you are using Dreamweaver, etc... it will write a bunch of code for you (I do NOT recommend this program).. i personally use textpad for all my coding. It will color code HTML and PHP.. Ultraedit is another nice one.

    Stylemaster Pro (http://www.westciv.com/) will color code CSS. Westciv also has some good free resources for intro'ing yourself to CSS.

    Shark_MegaByte on
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    RoundBoyRoundBoy Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    Horus wrote: »
    Thats good advice, and I appreciate your post. I am basically just doing XHTML/CSS with very minor PHP which is like common sense I know how to mess with it. I just need to put effort in my personal time to help me with the job.

    Thanks for the resources, got any books? or magazines?

    Books are not *that* great, as things move too quickly, and online resources are plenty.

    CSS is a matter of starting 'big' (the entire document) and working your way down to the individual element level... while its nice to 'technically' be correct, you will rewrite code specific to IE and firefox, etc all the time.. plus the required hacks.

    RoundBoy on
    sig_civwar.jpg
    Librarians harbor a terrible secret. Find it.
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    iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Cornfield? Cornfield.Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    Re: starting a career in something new/unfamilar:
    You were honest about your skillset, and you were able to demonstrate what you knew and you got the job. I hear that and I think that they know you've got a basic set of skills that they can build on. They can use your skills, teach you new things, and they will benefit from having another solid developer. Don't freak out man, it sounds like they know what they are doing, and that they are willing to put the time in with you. Follow these dudes' advice on the actual web dev stuff, and for the other part: settle down, and give yourself a chance to catch up and get on-board with your new employer.

    iTunesIsEvil on
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    JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited April 2008
    This is an excellent book on CSS, written for a variety of experience levels.

    http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/csstmm/index.html

    I would recommend it to anyone wanting to get a very good understanding of CSS.

    Jasconius on
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