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citation woes? quickie

mooshoeporkmooshoepork Registered User regular
edited April 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
Hey, I am first year of university, so all of this is kind of strange to me. I just have a quick question about citing.

When paraphrasing someone else's idea when do I cite their name? This is a step by step idea and it seems ridiculous to do it at every sentence. The reason I worry, is because I have to submit it to "turnitin" which is a program that checks for plagiarism. argh. Help.

Example:

2. “Boxed-in mark” (Kemp, 2008, p.34)
A “Boxed-in” individual usually doesn’t understand how an idea will work (disbelief), and thinks it will not work in practice (doubt). (Kemp, 2008) It is important to ask them what needs to change, in order for it to work, and explain the idea to them. This will move them possibly into engaged, or at least neutral.

edit: I think it is the Harvard method if that makes a difference.

mooshoepork on

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    Kate of LokysKate of Lokys Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    If "boxed-in" is their phrase, then both of those examples would be direct quotes; neither one is a paraphrase if you're using a specific expression like that.

    Quote:
    According to Kemp (2004), a "boxed-in mark" is an individual who cannot understand how an idea will work, et cetera, lorem ipsum dolor blah.

    Paraphrase:
    Some individuals go through stages of disbelief and doubt when presented with new ideas: first they do not understand how the idea will work, then they question its practical applicability (Kemp, 2008).

    You can usually find good online style guides for whatever format your teacher wants you to use. I've always used the Online Writing Lab at Purdue University - they have fairly detailed guides for APA, MLA, and Chicago style. Haven't heard of Harvard before, but it might be close enough to one of the others for jazz.

    Also, as far as turnitin goes... all the site does is scan your paper for recognizable word strings. That's it. It doesn't analyze your citations at all. So, if you're writing, say, an English paper on Frankenstein, and you use a bunch of quotes from the book to illustrate your points, turnitin is going to be all "OMG 20% of this paper contains text that matches something in my database!" and you're going to be all D: . Don't worry about it, though. It takes a human to actually look at the paper and say "Hey, this text is highlighted as being recognized, but it's from the course book, and it's perfectly formatted as a block quote, with a proper citation at the end. It's cool."

    Kate of Lokys on
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    mooshoeporkmooshoepork Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    Thanks for the reply. The lecturer/teacher said that if it's over 5% that you need to call her. I thought it sounded ridiculous. She acted as if, getting 20% was impossible unless you actually plagiarized.

    mooshoepork on
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    Kate of LokysKate of Lokys Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    Well, if you're supposed to be paraphrasing everything instead of using direct quotes, then yeah, 5% might be remotely reasonable. I'm an English major, though, and when your source material is the book itself, it's impossible to *not* reference it directly to make your points. It's hard to defend an author's use of rhetoric if you're rewording everything they said ;-)

    For a first-year paper, you can usually getting away with not citing much. I mean, obviously, reference everything you actually use, but you're not doing a literature review here. In fact, if most of your material is coming from that one source, cite him once at the beginning of that section, then only reference him again if you use a direct quote.

    "According to Kemp (2004), lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Kemp's theory also explains consequat faucibus pede. In other words, etiam justo nisi, vehicula ac, porta ac, ornare vitae, mi. This has led to some disagreement in the industry, phasellus dui. Pellentesque nunc purus, lacinia at, rhoncus vitae, feugiat sit amet, massa. Etiam vestibulum posuere mi. However, research has clearly demonstrated the validity of this analysis: "Direct quote from him" (Kemp, 2004)."

    Kate of Lokys on
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    mooshoeporkmooshoepork Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    Ah, I am with you, I probably over cited...if that is possible. It is impossible not to though. I am explaining his idea, and it IS his idea, so I need to cite HIM. If I just change the words, it is still HIS idea. argh, this subject is silly.

    mooshoepork on
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    AresProphetAresProphet Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    Listen to Kate. That link to OWL should be set as your browser's homepage if you write a lot of papers.

    The art of proper paraphrasing is an important skill in writing papers. I tend to use the method Kate shows, with only two or three short direct quotes per paragraph (or one lengthy one). Cite those properly, cite once for paraphrasing, and refer back to your source when you're paraphrasing again. If you at least name them, you shouldn't have to do a parenthetical citation every time you're paraphrasing.

    It's possible that an instructor for a first-year course is going to be really strict about having perfect citations. If you're paraphrasing the proper method is somewhat fluid anyway, and it's mostly errors in your parentheticals that you'll get docked for.

    And you probably don't need to be worried about the plagiarism stuff unless you're, you know, actually plagiarizing. Or using large block quotes without proper citation. As I understand it they're more concerned about student-student plagiarism rather than student-source.
    Ah, I am with you, I probably over cited...if that is possible. It is impossible not to though. I am explaining his idea, and it IS his idea, so I need to cite HIM. If I just change the words, it is still HIS idea. argh, this subject is silly.

    If it's this book the author is a she, not a he. Which you probably knew and just mistyped out of stress.

    AresProphet on
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    mooshoeporkmooshoepork Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    AH YES. Yeah, argh. Turning it into turnitin now :( I'll let you know how it goes.

    mooshoepork on
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    mooshoeporkmooshoepork Registered User regular
    edited April 2008
    update: It came through. 2 % :) Thanks for the help. Can't believe I stressed myself over it. The 2% that did show up was in the bibliography anyway.

    mooshoepork on
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