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Tough Books? Pshaw.

DyvionDyvion Back in Sunny Florida!!Registered User regular
I'm curious if any of you have actually encountered a lap top that can withstand field use and not fall to pieces. I work in an organization that has roughly 120 Panasonic Tough Books, and only about 40 of them are usable after a year. It is also essential that there not be small pieces involved (which has caused numerous incidents). We're pretty fed up with what we've gotten from panasonic, as users. And I must preface this with the fact that I am in no way involved with the decision making process. But I want to know if you have encountered a laptop computer that can be even remotely considered reliable. I'm talking falling from up to 25 feet in the air onto concrete and staying together(without small pieces coming off), completely useable; Multiple times. Taking any weather you can throw at it (including extreme rain, cold/ice, heat). Being completely submerged in oil based fluids for up to a minute. Our tough books were marketed to us being able to take those conditions. And they can't. (Including the hilarity of the LCD screens freezing, while in use.)

Have you seen a laptop that can take it?

Steam: No Safety In Life
PSN: Dyvion -- Eternal: Dyvion+9393 -- Genshin Impact: Dyvion
Dyvion on

Posts

  • JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Lenovo has a ruggedized portable that I've heard is pretty good. But honestly, if your stuff is being dropped from 25 feet onto concrete, maybe you should just buy some harnesses?

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • DyvionDyvion Back in Sunny Florida!!Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    They aren't intentionally dropped... it just kinda happens. Harnesses would be a superb idea however, and I'm honestly surprised I (or someone with much more education and experience than me) didn't think of that. Some kind of tether at the least would be an appropriate addition. And would probably save enough money to make up for it's own costs. That still doesn't solve the other problems, but goes along way to eliminating a few of them.

    Dyvion on
    Steam: No Safety In Life
    PSN: Dyvion -- Eternal: Dyvion+9393 -- Genshin Impact: Dyvion
  • Seaborn111Seaborn111 Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    i would honestly say sticking with the panasonics and finding a way to harness them is probably the only thing you're going to find.


    seriously though? a laptop that can take THAT much? maybe you don't need laptops

    Seaborn111 on
    </bush>
    It's impossible for us to without a doubt prove the non-existence of God. We just have to take it on faith that he's imaginary..
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    No one has made a portable computer that can be dropped from 25 feet multiple times, so good luck with getting one. Hell, even mil. spec isn't going to be THAT rugged.

    That_Guy on
  • DyvionDyvion Back in Sunny Florida!!Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    That_Guy wrote: »
    No one has made a portable computer that can be dropped from 25 feet multiple times, so good luck with getting one. Hell, even mil. spec isn't going to be THAT rugged.

    Yeah... that's the problem. They're -supposed- to be mil spec. And they were marketed to us that way.

    Before this we used little plastic binders, with pages held in by 7 punched holes. The pages were 5" by 8" (I know, because I cut many, many of them from 8.5" by 11" paper). And we had 3000 of them. The laptops were supposed to give everyone the ability to have all of these books at there disposal when they were working. With over 20 work 'stations' (using the term station loosely) and many many different jobs to accomplish at each 'station' the books became unpractical. The miracle laptops stepped in to save the day. Now we're worse off because we're not allowed to use the paper copies anymore (they were all permanently disposed of) and we're down to less than 1/3 of what we need to actually accomplish our... job.

    What about an e-book reader? Are there any of those that are tremendously tough? We don't actually -need- a laptop per se, that's just what won the contract.

    Dyvion on
    Steam: No Safety In Life
    PSN: Dyvion -- Eternal: Dyvion+9393 -- Genshin Impact: Dyvion
  • Captain_BrianCaptain_Brian Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    There isn't too much of a demand for laptops that can be deep fried in vegitable oil, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and then thrown off of a 2 story building. The fact that a third of those Panasonic laptops lasted a year in those conditions makes me want to run out and buy one.

    Captain_Brian on
    Captain_Brian-ashsig.jpg
  • Captain_BrianCaptain_Brian Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    MIL-STD 810F



    Drop Test
    The Drop test was performed in accordance with MIL-STD-810F, Method 516.5, Procedure IV (Transit Drop Test). The Toughbook notebooks were sequentially dropped in non-operating mode, onto each face, edge and corner for a total of 26 drops from a height of 36 inches. The drop surface was defined as two-inch-thick plywood over a steel plate over concrete. The Toughbook notebooks were visually inspected after each drop and a functional check (boot-up into Windows) was performed after each drop.

    Results
    The Toughbook computers boot Windows® following each drop.




    Vibration
    The Vibration shall be performed in accordance with MIL-STD-810F, Method 514, Procedure I, Category 24 (Minimum Integrity Test) for the non-operational condition and Category 20 (Ground Vehicles) for the operational condition. The unit should be clamped to an aluminum plate (approximating rigid mounting), and subjects to the following levels of vibration:

    Non-Operational (from Figure 514.5C-17 of MIL-STD-810F) 0.04 g2 /Hz at 20-1000 Hz, -6 dB/Octave at 1000-2000 Hz, 1 hour/axis duration.

    Operational (Figure 514.5C-1 of MIL-STD-810F) 0.001 g2 /Hz at 12.5 Hz, 0.034 g2 /Hz at 20~40 Hz 5.70E-06 g2 /Hz at 200 Hz, 1 hour/axis duration simulating 1000 miles of transportation.

    The hard disk drive was spinning during the operational test. A functional test was performed between each axis of testing, to catch any potential failures. The operational test was conducted using the vertical axis power spectral density (worst case condition for amplitude), as the orientation of the test item during transportation is not known.

    Results
    All units passed the vibration test without incident.




    Water Resistance
    The Water Resistance test was performed in accordance with MIL-STD-810F, Method 506.4, Procedure III (Drip). The test items were subjected to this test with the LCD open and the unit operating, but with ports closed. The Toughbook PCs were opened following testing to inspect for water intrusion.

    Results
    The Toughbook computers continued to operate during and following the 15-minute water drip test. There was no evidence of water intrusion.



    Humidity
    The Humidity test was performed in accordance with MIL-STD-810F, Method 507.4 (Aggravated). The test items were tested for operation near the conclusion of the fifth and tenth cycles. Each cycle was one day (24 hours) and the entire test was performed over ten days.The temperature was cycled between 86 and 140°F with the relative humidity at 95% constant.

    Results
    The Toughbook PCs continued to boot up and operate following each test, and there were no visual anomalies.




    Dust Resistance
    The Dust Resistance test was performed in accordance with MIL-STD-810F, Method 510.4, Procedure I (Dust). An operating temperature of 140°F was used for this test. The upper non-operating temperature of 140°F was incorporated into the test as this is the "default" temperature given by the MIL-STD-810F guidelines. Silica flour as defined by the test standard was used. Failure was considered to have occurred if moving parts bind or are blocked, or if contacts or relays malfunctioned. The units must have continued to function also.

    Results
    The Toughbook PCs continued to operate following dust testing. The keyboards were usable.



    High Temperature
    High Temperature tests were conducted in accordance with MIL-STD-810F, Method 501.4, Procedures I (Storage) and Procedure II (Operation). Panasonic set the testing parameters as follows: 140°F Operational, 160°F Non-Operational


    Results
    The Toughbook PCs continued to operate during the operational test and to boot and operate following the non-operational test. There were no visual anomalies.





    Low Temperature
    The Low Temperature test was performed according to MIL-STD-810F, Method 502.4, Procedures I (Storage) and II (Operation). Panasonic set the low operating temperature at -20°F and non-operating temperature at -60°F.

    Results
    The Toughbook PCs continued to boot and operate following each test, and there were no visual anomalies.



    Thermal Shock
    The Thermal Shock test was performed in accordance with MIL-STD-810F, Method 503.4. Panasonic set the high temperature non-operating temperature at 205°F and the low temperature non-operating temperature at -60°F. Three cycles were performed (high to low = one cycle).

    Results
    The Toughbook PCs continued to operate during the operational test and to boot and operate following the non-operational test. There were no visual anomalies.

    The Toughbook PCs continued to boot up and operate following the test exposure cycles of thermal shock from 205°F to -60°F.




    Altitude
    The Altitude test was performed in accordance with MIL-STD-810F, Method 500.4, Procedure I (Storage) and II (Operation). The altitude level used for both procedures was 15,000 feet (highest equivalent altitude given within MIL-STD-810F for cargo pressures of military aircraft).

    Results
    All Toughbook laptops passed the test without incident.


    Full details of each test are contained in a test report that was produced by an independent, internationally recognized test laboratory.

    Captain_Brian on
    Captain_Brian-ashsig.jpg
  • ViscountalphaViscountalpha The pen is mightier than the sword http://youtu.be/G_sBOsh-vyIRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Dyvion wrote: »
    I'm curious if any of you have actually encountered a lap top that can withstand field use and not fall to pieces. I work in an organization that has roughly 120 Panasonic Tough Books, and only about 40 of them are usable after a year. It is also essential that there not be small pieces involved (which has caused numerous incidents). We're pretty fed up with what we've gotten from panasonic, as users. And I must preface this with the fact that I am in no way involved with the decision making process. But I want to know if you have encountered a laptop computer that can be even remotely considered reliable. I'm talking falling from up to 25 feet in the air onto concrete and staying together(without small pieces coming off), completely useable; Multiple times. Taking any weather you can throw at it (including extreme rain, cold/ice, heat). Being completely submerged in oil based fluids for up to a minute. Our tough books were marketed to us being able to take those conditions. And they can't. (Including the hilarity of the LCD screens freezing, while in use.)

    Have you seen a laptop that can take it?

    I don't know of a single laptop designed for all of that kind of abuse. I honestly don't think it exists. If it did, someone, somewhere would of made a big deal about a special laptop that could.

    If you have the cash, you might challenge ben heck to make you a prototype. www.benheck.com He may or may not be interested.

    Viscountalpha on
  • Double_FacesDouble_Faces Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Not that this is terribly relevant, but I'm the actor in their viral video for panasonic toughbook....

    hehe. www.mylifeistough.com click the video at the top.

    Double_Faces on
    SSBB Code: 0258 9993 5495
  • DyvionDyvion Back in Sunny Florida!!Registered User regular
    edited May 2008

    Well I know for a fact that it won't work at -20°F... I was using one at night and half of the pixels stopped illuminating. I've also used one in drenching rain for 3 hours and it operated just fine. I saw the results of one kicked off of a... high surface... and it ended up in two pieces. Admittedly, it was a bit greater than 36 inches... I 'can't get there from here' but I don't know if the model we used is the same as the one that passed those tests. Is that the only mil spec test available?

    Dyvion on
    Steam: No Safety In Life
    PSN: Dyvion -- Eternal: Dyvion+9393 -- Genshin Impact: Dyvion
  • DyvionDyvion Back in Sunny Florida!!Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Not that this is terribly relevant, but I'm the actor in their viral video for panasonic toughbook....

    hehe. www.mylifeistough.com click the video at the top.

    Uh... I should insert a comment here about something... Oooh, I know, that chick you wouldn't sleep with was hot.

    Dyvion on
    Steam: No Safety In Life
    PSN: Dyvion -- Eternal: Dyvion+9393 -- Genshin Impact: Dyvion
  • Double_FacesDouble_Faces Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Dyvion wrote: »
    Not that this is terribly relevant, but I'm the actor in their viral video for panasonic toughbook....

    hehe. www.mylifeistough.com click the video at the top.

    Uh... I should insert a comment here about something... Oooh, I know, that chick you wouldn't sleep with was hot.

    Makeup is a beautiful thing, my friend.

    Double_Faces on
    SSBB Code: 0258 9993 5495
  • DyvionDyvion Back in Sunny Florida!!Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Dyvion wrote: »
    Not that this is terribly relevant, but I'm the actor in their viral video for panasonic toughbook....

    hehe. www.mylifeistough.com click the video at the top.

    Uh... I should insert a comment here about something... Oooh, I know, that chick you wouldn't sleep with was hot.

    Makeup is a beautiful thing, my friend.

    That chick you wouldn't sleep with... her friend was hot.

    Dyvion on
    Steam: No Safety In Life
    PSN: Dyvion -- Eternal: Dyvion+9393 -- Genshin Impact: Dyvion
  • Double_FacesDouble_Faces Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Dyvion wrote: »
    Dyvion wrote: »
    Not that this is terribly relevant, but I'm the actor in their viral video for panasonic toughbook....

    hehe. www.mylifeistough.com click the video at the top.

    Uh... I should insert a comment here about something... Oooh, I know, that chick you wouldn't sleep with was hot.

    Makeup is a beautiful thing, my friend.

    That chick you wouldn't sleep with... her friend was hot.

    Hehe.. that's my roommate's ex, funny enough. Yeah, she's a great girl.

    Double_Faces on
    SSBB Code: 0258 9993 5495
  • CycophantCycophant Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Yeah, I'm with everyone else - you'll probably never find a laptop, or indeed almost any electronic along those lines, that could handle abuse like that.

    Our company uses laptops to access aviation manuals in the field, and they go to some pretty inhospitable locations, and take a lot of abuse. But the laptops themselves are usually just Toshiba or Acer generic, run-of-the-mill laptops. The key is how they're transported, though. Pelican Cases. The most rugged, reliable case for anything you'll ever find.

    If most of the damage is occurring while the the laptops are actually open and being used though, I think you need to find some kind of alternative then. Or train your users not to act so carelessly with electronics.

    Cycophant on
    sig.gif
  • DyvionDyvion Back in Sunny Florida!!Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Cycophant wrote: »
    Yeah, I'm with everyone else - you'll probably never find a laptop, or indeed almost any electronic along those lines, that could handle abuse like that.

    Our company uses laptops to access aviation manuals in the field, and they go to some pretty inhospitable locations, and take a lot of abuse. But the laptops themselves are usually just Toshiba or Acer generic, run-of-the-mill laptops. The key is how they're transported, though. Pelican Cases. The most rugged, reliable case for anything you'll ever find.

    If most of the damage is occurring while the the laptops are actually open and being used though, I think you need to find some kind of alternative then. Or train your users not to act so carelessly with electronics.

    If only. Well, hopefully someone higher than me is putting a lot of thought into this problem, because as it stands now we're just pouring money down the drain. They've tried holding users accountable for the condition of the laptops, but that only goes so far. I do really like the tether idea though, and I'll be submitting that one. Thanks seaborn111.

    Dyvion on
    Steam: No Safety In Life
    PSN: Dyvion -- Eternal: Dyvion+9393 -- Genshin Impact: Dyvion
  • mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    First, I'm going to assume you're talking about something along the lines of the...model numbers are escaping me, but CF-29 rings a bell. Anyway, the "fully ruggedized" models. Anyway, if those aren't standing up to the kind of a abuse you're putting them through, good fucking luck finding one that will. Such items do exist, but honestly they're going to be expensive enough that it might be cheaper just to accept short lifespans on your Toughbooks instead.

    Anyway, the fully ruggedized Toughbooks are pretty much the staple of the Army when it comes to computers, and we beat the shit out of them. However, I have run into a couple portable and semi-portable computers that were perhaps a bit sturdier than the more durable Toughbooks. They're generally special-purpose systems...the only one I can think of off the top of my head that is actually quasi-convenient as a man-carry would be some of the hardened systems used as document readers by maintenance personnel in the Army. But I'm only passingly familiar with them, so I can't help you track down model numbers or anything. Just assure you that there do exist at least some systems more durable than the top-of-the-line Toughbooks.

    To be honest, though, I don't think even those would survive the kind of abuse you're talking about. Really, aside from the freezing LCD issue I'd say that all of the durability standards you're talking about are way outside of what it's reasonable to expect from any electronics.

    EDIT: Also, if you're using the full-sized (14" or so) models, you might consider trying to see if they still make any of the "mini" models. We had some that were like 6" or 8" screens, mini keyboards, and no optical drives (still had touch-screens and wi-fi)...but they seemed to be a bit sturdier than the larger models, and perhaps if they were just a bit smaller they'd be both easier to tether and users would be less likely to drop them. I think they were discontinued, though.

    mcdermott on
  • ToyDToyD Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I'd pretty much have to agree with mcdermott. We have one here that's REALLY durable, but it's a unique special purpose laptop by Ecylpse for only one thing. They don't sell laptops. Otherwise we use the Panasonic ones as well and find that we have similar problems when they fall off things like... airplane wings.

    So, interesting story since it directly relates and is funny as hell. My cohort in crime went to a conference where several vendors were showcasing new test equipment. Basically these people stand in their booth, assault you as you walk by, and try to convince you that their new stuff is EXACTLY what you need.

    Well, my cohort here got wrangled by one of these guys and he's just going on and on about how awesome this new gadget in his hand is, and especially how tough it is and how it will last forever. Now, for us, especially for handheld equipment, it MUST actually be tough, this shit falls 30 feet sometimes on accident. Well, the sales guy hands it over to my cohort and my cohort looks him dead in the eye and says "it's toughened?"
    "Yep," says salesguy.
    My cohort drops it straight onto the concrete floor right there at his feet and it shatters into hundreds of pieces. The guy's only demo model.
    His eyes got HUGE and he starts stuttering a little in disbelief.
    My cohort says, "Not really that tough."
    And continues walking on.
    The guy is just staring at the floor.

    Good lord it was the most hilarious thing ever and I don't think I'd believe it had I not seen it. The expression of the guy was just disbelief. Heh.

    Good luck in your search ;-)

    ToyD on
    steam_sig.png
  • devoirdevoir Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    That's so me. :p The guy's not much of a salesman if he didn't cover up and say it was only a mockup.

    devoir on
  • AzioAzio Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Toughbooks are pretty durable compared to the majority of business notebooks. Your demands are simply unreasonable outside of military applications. Computers are very fragile and contain millions of high-precision components that can easily be shaken or shocked out of place. It's very hard to make a computer shock resistant, let alone harden it against a 25-foot drop. Tell your people to treat their computers with more respect than Fisher Price toys and you might not get so many failures.

    Azio on
  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2008
    Azio wrote: »
    Toughbooks are pretty durable compared to the majority of business notebooks. Your demands are simply unreasonable outside of military applications.

    No, his demands are simply unreasonable even if he were a representative of a military force. It's completely and totally absurd to insist that it's the laptop's fault for breaking after falling 25 feet. Put the fucking things on a tether or start firing people who can't manage to not kick a laptop off of a 25 foot high platform. I work in a facility that has people on 20 foot skyjacks doing work regularly and no one ever drops anything. I'm not even being facetious here, it's less than once a year because it's a huge lapse in workplace safety to be that careless and we hold people accountable to their actions like any reasonable employer should.

    Your problem is people. Stop trying to solve people with technology, you'll never accomplish anything better than a stopgap measure and let's face it: It's going to be an expensive and inadequate stopgap given your specific problem.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • DyvionDyvion Back in Sunny Florida!!Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I'm trying to be very un-specific, but yes, it's for a military application. And we don't really get a whole lot of choice in the people we get. The guy to your left could be the top of the line, spit polished stand up guy you would love to have with you in a fight. The guy to your right could be the absolute worst dirt bag, pulled his uniform out of a duffle that morning, polished his boot with a candy bar scum sucking maggot. You have to work with both of them; until the paper trail gets long enough, the dirt bag is staying in. And there are not enough supervisors to go around... so you can't just baby all of the dirt bags. They get time to themselves. I'm not working with 40 year old retired engineers here... they're generally a couple years out of high school, joined the military to see the world/get an education/kill people, about as responsible as a mature 14 year old. But they're doing the work and our rate of horrible incidents is fairly low. Darwin rears his head occasionally.

    I really am enjoying the suggestions though (apart from the people bit, which is understood, believe me) and please, keep the ideas/models coming... I'll go digging and see if I can find which exact model we use.

    e: Found it. So Called Toughbook Until I read the specifications I had totally forgotten about the 'pressure sensitive touch screen'. About 1/3 of the touch screens stopped working in the first week. Almost none of the touch screens work now. Also it states that the LCD screen is visible in daylight... yeah, if you hold your hand directly over what you're reading. Also the battery life is listed as 7 hours... but that's not even close to realistic. We've got literally hundreds of batteries, and pretty much everyone checks out three of them for their shift (which is generally 10 to 12 hours long).

    e2: I'm seriously wondering about our warranty here, and why half of these things haven't been returned.

    Dyvion on
    Steam: No Safety In Life
    PSN: Dyvion -- Eternal: Dyvion+9393 -- Genshin Impact: Dyvion
  • ToyDToyD Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I'll throw some more stuff out there for you:

    Dell's XFR-630
    Message from USGS about Xenocom's Rough Rider I experience in the field
    GoBook MAX

    Some stuff to get you looking around on the laptops. All I found were stories because I'm too lazy to go get the actual page from the manufacturer.

    Also, to the folks saying you've got people problems... True, but you all obviously don't live in the real world yet. Shit happens and gets broken despite the BEST trained people. I would MUCH rather this piddly $4000 laptop falls off the wing instead of, say, THE PERSON. They cost a lot more to fix. Or if they drop a quarter million dollar box. Or drop the engine. You guys seem to think that dropping the laptop is the worst thing that can happen. Not so much. It's piddly.

    ToyD on
    steam_sig.png
  • iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Cornfield? Cornfield.Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    If I were you I'd just go push the tethering angle to your superiors. This will work out in more ways than one. This way you say to your using-a-candy-bar-as-boot-polish asshats that "it's a weight. It is tied to you. Drop it and hopefully you don't get pulled over the edge. Lookit! Incentive to pay attention to what it is you're doing while on the job working with something that cost us $4k!"

    iTunesIsEvil on
  • DyvionDyvion Back in Sunny Florida!!Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Here's an article I noticed while perusing Slashdot. Apparently we're not the only ones having problems with ruggedized laptops...

    Computerworld Laptop Bashing

    The small flap on the power cover that came off of the toughbook is fairly common with our laptops as well... but not just on the power cord cover... Using these laptops on equipment where even the smallest of foreign objects means possible death and destruction, I'm surprised there have been no fatalities yet. We even went so far as to loctite -every- screw on -every- one of them because they fell out too often.

    I guess the laptops not working is only part of the problem, and I apologise for not making that clear in the OP. So I guess there really -isn't- anything out there yet.

    The article makes for interesting reading... like the rugged laptop that stopped working after being submerged in water. And I thought toughbooks were bad.

    Dyvion on
    Steam: No Safety In Life
    PSN: Dyvion -- Eternal: Dyvion+9393 -- Genshin Impact: Dyvion
  • 1ddqd1ddqd Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    If you do the tether idea, make sure it's flexible and has some give; a simple rope or laptop lock will just break the laptop's frame when it reaches the end of the rope

    1ddqd on
  • alcoholic_engineeralcoholic_engineer Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    1ddqd wrote: »
    If you do the tether idea, make sure it's flexible and has some give; a simple rope or laptop lock will just break the laptop's frame when it reaches the end of the rope

    might i recommend a fall arrest lanyard? they probably have a hell of alot of them already if people are working in the air already. When they get the weight, they dont just jerk to a stop; instead they gradually stretch to reduce the sudden stop.

    alcoholic_engineer on
  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    I just saw this on Engadget. It looks like a Tablet PC that can be used as a hammer. Might be close to what OP is looking for.

    http://www.engadget.com/2008/06/19/mobile-demand-proves-its-xtablet-pc-can-be-used-as-a-hammer/

    That_Guy on
  • Recoil42Recoil42 Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    Dell's got the ATG and XFR, which are supposed to compete with the toughbooks:

    http://www.dell.com/content/topics/topic.aspx/global/products/latit/topics/en/latit_atg?c=us&l=en&s=gen
    http://www.dell.com/content/products/productdetails.aspx?c=us&cs=04&id=latit_xfr_d630&l=en&s=bsd&~tab=bundlestab

    But I agree with what some people are saying above, NO computer is built to withstand the conditions you're expecting them to withstand here, outside of NASA. Not even military equipment is that tough. Teach your fucking users to respect the equipment a little better. You know, try NOT dropping a three thousand dollar piece of equipment 25 feet onto concrete.

    Recoil42 on
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