Why didn't you tell me Fables was awesome?

2

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  • ScooterScooter Registered User regular
    edited August 2006
    I've actually thought about it myself...not 616 Marvel specifically, but any 'modern' fictional universe. Movies, comics, video games, there's a ton of them. If the Fables could recruit just a couple superheroes or giant killer robots to their side, they could kick serious ass.

    Of course, modern stories isn't what Fables is about. Plus, copyrights. It would be interesting to see them though.

    Scooter on
  • TerrorbyteTerrorbyte __BANNED USERS
    edited August 2006
    I don't think Marvel of DC count as myth or legend quite yet. Give it a few hundred years. Plus, fables are typically moral tales with roots in folklore and an oral tradition. Then again, it's the whole anachronism of Fables' conceit that makes it such an interesting read.

    Terrorbyte on
  • SASA Registered User
    edited August 2006
    I could see them coming across an 1800s England sorta like League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Sherlock Holmes, Invisible Man, Dracula, etc.

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  • TerrorbyteTerrorbyte __BANNED USERS
    edited August 2006
    I could see them coming across an 1800s England sorta like League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Sherlock Holmes, Invisible Man, Dracula, etc.

    Yeah, but those characters aren't fables per se ... maybe with the exception of vampires. Sherlock Holmes and the Invisible Man are fictional characters from novels.

    Terrorbyte on
  • tombomb666tombomb666 Registered User
    edited August 2006
    Terrorbyte wrote:
    I could see them coming across an 1800s England sorta like League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Sherlock Holmes, Invisible Man, Dracula, etc.

    Yeah, but those characters aren't fables per se ... maybe with the exception of vampires. Sherlock Holmes and the Invisible Man are fictional characters from novels.
    The format of the work should not have any bearing. Fables are just folklore and comics can be seen as modern folk tales. I can't see how fables should be different than any other work of fiction.

    tombomb666 on
  • Kayne Red RobeKayne Red Robe Master of Magic ArcanusRegistered User regular
    edited August 2006
    So, I read the first TPB and am planning to pick up some more next time I nerd out at the comic shop, but I have a quick, weird question.
    During King Cole's Remembrance Day speech he specifically mentions two Kingdoms falling before whichever one it was he came from. Am I correct in thinking that the Emerald Kingdom is OZ and th great Lion's Kingdom is Narnia? It just seems a bit odd because those stories don't seem quite old enough yet to be fables.

    Kayne Red Robe on
  • mattharvestmattharvest Registered User regular
    edited August 2006
    So, I read the first TPB and am planning to pick up some more next time I nerd out at the comic shop, but I have a quick, weird question.
    During King Cole's Remembrance Day speech he specifically mentions two Kingdoms falling before whichever one it was he came from. Am I correct in thinking that the Emerald Kingdom is OZ and th great Lion's Kingdom is Narnia? It just seems a bit odd because those stories don't seem quite old enough yet to be fables.

    The Emerald Kingdom is not Oz, it's from the Man of La Mancha, Don Quixote. You can tell because, in the adjoining panels, Don Quixote and Sancho are both shown.

    The Kingdom of Narnia is indeed mentioned, but only obliquely (those characters are all still in copyright). He is referred to only as a holier-than-thou Lion. The fact that Narnia is referred to disparagingly is probably intentional, given the amount of detail in the books.

    mattharvest on
  • mattharvestmattharvest Registered User regular
    edited August 2006
    tombomb666 wrote:
    The format of the work should not have any bearing. Fables are just folklore and comics can be seen as modern folk tales. I can't see how fables should be different than any other work of fiction.

    The difference is that folk tales - fables - are actually believed, at least for a time. There was a time where Snow White was told as true (however much the parents knew it to be false) to children, but Superman was never told as true.

    It's been shown repeatedly that belief is a strong connector to the power of the particular fables (e.g. Jack of Tales' massive empowerment after his movies renewed popularity, and the current arc in Jack's book) but isn't the sole indicator (e.g. Frau Totenkinder destroying Baba Yaga without much effort). The fact that people dont believe in Superman and other such modern stories in the same way may be key.

    There is also the fact that it is unclear how Fables (in the sense of mythical characters) are created. The current Jack arc indicates that there was a period in the Mundane world's history where magic creatures ran rampant, but they were slowly murdered and removed. The fact that Fables from the Homelands receive power from our belief isn't explained.

    EDIT: We actually know that the time of first telling of a story is irrelevant to the time of 'creation' of the Fables. For example, the Liliputians came to our world years and years before Gulliver's Travels was ever written. Similarly, Wonderland was conquered long before the books were ever written.

    There have been certain stories (not in Fables, but in other books) where Authors and other Artists are viewed as not in fact creating, but receiving information from distant lands somehow. In this way, perhaps only those stories that are based on "actual" things in the Homelands empower Fables, while other stories (i.e. other lies) don't do anything.

    (this is all reminiscent of discussions of Gaiman's American Gods books)

    mattharvest on
  • ScooterScooter Registered User regular
    edited August 2006
    That would make sense, otherwise any Adversary plan to attack the world of their creators would probably be really stupid.

    Scooter on
  • ServoServo Registered User, ClubPA
    edited August 2006
    (e.g. Frau Totenkinder destroying Baba Yaga without much effort).

    i actually kind of thought that was because in america, hansel and gretel were way more well known than baba yaga

    not totally, but at least related to that


    plus, frau totenkinder is one of my favorite characters. she's gotten a lot more clever since the days when children were able to trick her into ovens

    Servo on
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  • mattharvestmattharvest Registered User regular
    edited August 2006
    Servo wrote:
    (e.g. Frau Totenkinder destroying Baba Yaga without much effort).

    i actually kind of thought that was because in america, hansel and gretel were way more well known than baba yaga

    not totally, but at least related to that


    plus, frau totenkinder is one of my favorite characters. she's gotten a lot more clever since the days when children were able to trick her into ovens

    If you go back and read their conversation, it's clear that they both agree that Baba Yaga is better known than Frau. The reason is simple: everyone knows Baba's name - their belief is focused - whereas the name "Frau Totenkinder" is just a clever name (meaning Ms. Child-cooker) the creators of the series made up. Frau is a collection of all the ambiguous black-forest witches of several stories - like Jack - but normally this would mean that she'd be weak (like Jack before his movies). In their conversation, Frau indicates she doesn't fully believe in the "belief=power" concept, but that claim is weakened by the fact that she also talks of having lain a variety of magical wards over Fabletown to create a "place of power".

    mattharvest on
  • HardtargetHardtarget There Are Four Lights VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited September 2006
    so i just read trades 1 and 2.

    fuck i'm probably going to go back to the shop and pick up 3 - 6 tommorow.

    so expensive but so good

    Hardtarget on
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  • DakDak Registered User
    edited September 2006
    Servo wrote:
    (e.g. Frau Totenkinder destroying Baba Yaga without much effort).

    i actually kind of thought that was because in america, hansel and gretel were way more well known than baba yaga

    not totally, but at least related to that


    plus, frau totenkinder is one of my favorite characters. she's gotten a lot more clever since the days when children were able to trick her into ovens

    If you go back and read their conversation, it's clear that they both agree that Baba Yaga is better known than Frau. The reason is simple: everyone knows Baba's name - their belief is focused - whereas the name "Frau Totenkinder" is just a clever name (meaning Ms. Child-cooker) the creators of the series made up. Frau is a collection of all the ambiguous black-forest witches of several stories - like Jack - but normally this would mean that she'd be weak (like Jack before his movies). In their conversation, Frau indicates she doesn't fully believe in the "belief=power" concept, but that claim is weakened by the fact that she also talks of having lain a variety of magical wards over Fabletown to create a "place of power".


    How is that claim weakened? She was laying magical wards. That has nothing to do with the belief of the mundies.

    Dak on
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  • Kshah777Kshah777 Registered User
    edited September 2006
    I just finished all the trades... damn, I really love this book. Bigby might just be one of my new favorite characters in comics. About time a (were)wolf got some badass points. I'm sick of stuck up vampires and mindless zombies.

    Kshah777 on
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  • SkankPlayaSkankPlaya Registered User regular
    edited September 2006
    I just finished the 6th trade. I fucking loved it! Both Jack & Blue are awesome characters. Seemingly unidimensional, Jack still manages to pull off a fantastic trick. And Blue being a bad ass is sweet.

    SkankPlaya on
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck begin again Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    I read the first 11 issues. Is it pretty much standard for the rest of the series?

    skippydumptruck on
  • robosagogorobosagogo Registered User
    edited October 2006
    The first arc is kind of boring compared to the rest. It's not much of a mystery, really.

    robosagogo on
  • skippydumptruckskippydumptruck begin again Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    I will give it another 12 or so, then.

    skippydumptruck on
  • MunchMunch Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    I read the first 11 issues. Is it pretty much standard for the rest of the series?

    I thought the first trade (I dunno, first six or so issues?) was kind of weak, not bad but not especially standout, but by the third trade it had really picked up steam. The series just seems to continue to get better as you find out more about the characters' pasts, and their relationships with each other. Plus, characters actually grow in this series, something that's hard to accomplish in more mainstream titles. Characters are constantly moving in and out of the spotlight, some dying, some leaving Fabletown, some returning triumphantly, etc. I find that the more I read of it the more I appreciate it, because events just continually build upon each other.

    Munch on
  • MarathonMarathon Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    I picked up the first trade a couple days ago. Overall I got a kick out of it and by the end of it I was already looking foreward to getting the rest of them. From what ive seen here I doubt ill be disappointed.

    Marathon on
  • Garlic BreadGarlic Bread Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    Really, the whole series is worth reading just for issue #50

    Garlic Bread on
  • DJ EebsDJ Eebs Moderator mod
    edited October 2006
    I think this may be the only series I wait for the trade for. But I haven't decided yet.

    DJ Eebs on
  • Bloods EndBloods End Blade of Tyshalle Punch dimensionRegistered User regular
    edited October 2006
    How awesome is 1001 Nights of Snowfall?

    More awesome then words can describe.

    Bloods End on
  • Garlic BreadGarlic Bread Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    fuck you


    (i don't have any money :( )

    Garlic Bread on
  • TerrorbyteTerrorbyte __BANNED USERS
    edited October 2006
    Bloods End wrote:
    How awesome is 1001 Nights of Snowfall?

    More awesome then words can describe.

    Yeah, it blew me away. Too many fantastic character moments.

    Terrorbyte on
  • DJ EebsDJ Eebs Moderator mod
    edited October 2006
    Keith wrote:
    fuck you


    (i don't have any money :( )

    same here

    I'm already pushing a lot of things untill after christmas

    DJ Eebs on
  • Garlic BreadGarlic Bread Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    Geebs wrote:
    Keith wrote:
    fuck you


    (i don't have any money :( )

    same here

    I'm already pushing a lot of things untill after christmas

    my old/semi-future boss picked it up

    i'm sure i can borrow it from him

    Garlic Bread on
  • BlackjackBlackjack Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    Bloods End wrote:
    How awesome is 1001 Nights of Snowfall?

    More awesome then words can describe.

    Worth the price of admission just for the Frau Totenkinder chapter.

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  • TerrorbyteTerrorbyte __BANNED USERS
    edited October 2006
    Blackjack wrote:
    Bloods End wrote:
    How awesome is 1001 Nights of Snowfall?

    More awesome then words can describe.

    Worth the price of admission just for the Frau Totenkinder chapter.

    Man, she was totally smokin' way back when. 1,001 Nights of Snowfall? More like 1,001 Panels of Gratuitous Nudity.

    Terrorbyte on
  • lostwordslostwords Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    Bloods End wrote:
    How awesome is 1001 Nights of Snowfall?

    More awesome then words can describe.

    Derek Kirk Kim's part was my fave, but way too short. Good mix of sad and funny. I wish he'd do a monthly comic.

    But the whole book was made of awesome delicious.

    lostwords on
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  • LavaKnightLavaKnight Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    I have a sort of question about Fables that I don't want to sound mean. It's not meant to be, it's just what I thought. I've read the first book, but I didn't really like the writing. I think the idea is wonderful, and loved the story and everything, but the writing just kind of felt adequate at best.

    Does it get better with subsequent books? I'd really like to love it, but I'm not sure if I could put up with it if the writing didn't improve. It wasn't terrible, but it wasn't something I'd follow the whole way through.

    LavaKnight on
  • Bloods EndBloods End Blade of Tyshalle Punch dimensionRegistered User regular
    edited October 2006
    LavaKnight wrote:
    I have a sort of question about Fables that I don't want to sound mean. It's not meant to be, it's just what I thought. I've read the first book, but I didn't really like the writing. I think the idea is wonderful, and loved the story and everything, but the writing just kind of felt adequate at best.

    Does it get better with subsequent books? I'd really like to love it, but I'm not sure if I could put up with it if the writing didn't improve. It wasn't terrible, but it wasn't something I'd follow the whole way through.

    I hate you.

    Bloods End on
  • CariblueCariblue Registered User
    edited October 2006
    Fables is probably my favorite comic book.

    Also poor Ambrose, he wasn't one of my favorites in the main series but this one made me like him more, and I really like the way he was drawn in it compared to the main series.

    Cariblue on
  • NondocNondoc Registered User
    edited October 2006
    thunderfoot.jpg

    I know this was actually a really sad scene, but man seriously

    Nondoc on
  • MarathonMarathon Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    Well rabbits don't really have hands they can use to cast spells. Would you have liked it better if she shot the magic out of her ears?

    Marathon on
  • NondocNondoc Registered User
    edited October 2006
    Marathon wrote:
    Well rabbits don't really have hands they can use to cast spells. Would you have liked it better if she shot the magic out of her ears?

    Laser beam eyes

    Nondoc on
  • MarathonMarathon Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    Nondoc wrote:
    Marathon wrote:
    Well rabbits don't really have hands they can use to cast spells. Would you have liked it better if she shot the magic out of her ears?

    Laser beam eyes

    The magic has to get there somehow. But ill admit, when I opened up that page I saw that out of the corner of my eye and thought "what the hell?" It made alot more sence when I actually read it. That story and the frog prince's were both really sad.

    Marathon on
  • bobgorilabobgorila Registered User
    edited October 2006
    rabbit laser vision attack, pew pew

    bobgorila on
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  • Spectre-xSpectre-x Registered User regular
    edited October 2006
    Servo wrote:
    (e.g. Frau Totenkinder destroying Baba Yaga without much effort).

    i actually kind of thought that was because in america, hansel and gretel were way more well known than baba yaga

    not totally, but at least related to that


    plus, frau totenkinder is one of my favorite characters. she's gotten a lot more clever since the days when children were able to trick her into ovens

    If you go back and read their conversation, it's clear that they both agree that Baba Yaga is better known than Frau. The reason is simple: everyone knows Baba's name - their belief is focused - whereas the name "Frau Totenkinder" is just a clever name (meaning Ms. Child-cooker) the creators of the series made up. Frau is a collection of all the ambiguous black-forest witches of several stories - like Jack - but normally this would mean that she'd be weak (like Jack before his movies). In their conversation, Frau indicates she doesn't fully believe in the "belief=power" concept, but that claim is weakened by the fact that she also talks of having lain a variety of magical wards over Fabletown to create a "place of power".

    Heh.

    Frau Totenkinder totally means Ms. dead children. Not Child-cooker.

    And she says that while she doesn't really believe in the belief=power as it hasen't been tested under controlled conditions, she does mention that while she tried to stay out of the spotlight and keep her own counsel, she also happens to be the witch from Hansel and Gretel, making her an incredibly, incredibly well-known Fable, easily on par with Baba Yaga in modern times, seeing as Baba Yaga actually isn't that well-known these days anymore.

    She also says that Baba Yaga used to be better at magic than her, but she's had centuries upon centuries to lay down magic wards and create her own place of power.

    So basically you're wrong about a lot of stuff, actually.

    Spectre-x on
  • Bloods EndBloods End Blade of Tyshalle Punch dimensionRegistered User regular
    edited October 2006
    The flycatcher story is the most horrible thing ever.

    Bloods End on
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