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[Incommunicado no more!] Windows 7 details! No new kernel, video of multi-touch, etc

squirlysquirly Registered User
Okay, so Steve Sinofsky went all "No more flashy codenames!" on us and has in some ways changed how Windows is being developed so what we have is Windows 7 of which next to nothing was known but now, the D6 conference is on and it's confirmed that MS will have Gates and Ballmer on stage demonstrating some of the new GUI and other things.

The D6 conference is on in, well, I think it's on now or just happened but on the official Vista blog and elsewhere some small details about Windows 7 have appeared.

Official Vista Blog: Microsoft demonstrates Multi-touch [Video]
Officiall Vista Blog: Communicating Windows 7
Engadget live blogging of D, Gates and Ballmer on stage
CNet: 3 things learnt from an interview with Sinofsky (Release date is around end of Jan 2010 / W7 kernel is an 'evolutionary improvement' and not MinWin / Driver model is the same / Sparse, ambiguous details about features)
Another sort of live blogging of the presentation
CNet interview with Sinofsky

Overall, not a hell of a lot shown but at least it's something and it confirms things like multi-touch coming to Windows and shows the MinWin kernel rumour to be false. Also, W7 will still have 32 and 64 bit versions but I predict 64 bit being the most popular by far considering all the big companies now shipping 64 bit Vista on some of their machines to consumer and that W7 will be out in ~ 2 years..

Oh, and there will be public betas like there was for Vista and system requirements are more or less going to be the same as Vista. So, I can guarantee the performance and driver compatibility problems (Which were incredibly overblown anyway) will not be the slightest problem at all.

Diablo2 [US West; Ladder]: *DorianGraph [New/Main] *outsidewhale [Old]
squirly on

Posts

  • That_GuyThat_Guy I don't wanna be that guy Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    They have been using more or less the same kernel since windows nt/2000. WHY IN THE NAME OF HELL CAN THEY NOT DEVELOP A NEW KERNEL AND FILING SYSTEM?!?!! I don't want a flashier version of Vista. Vista is all well and good (I am using it myself) but there were no performance improvements like the move from 9x to 2k/XP.

    That_Guy on
    camo_sig.png
  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    No MinWin? Why? Is this going to be yet another version of Windows that won't work on the EEE and similar computers, meaning that [strike]we'll[/strike] you'll be using XP, an already seven year old operating system, for the next four or five years?

    lolmicrosoft

    Daedalus on
  • squirlysquirly Registered User
    edited May 2008
    That_Guy wrote: »
    They have been using more or less the same kernel since windows nt/2000. WHY IN THE NAME OF HELL CAN THEY NOT DEVELOP A NEW KERNEL AND FILING SYSTEM?!?!! I don't want a flashier version of Vista. Vista is all well and good (I am using it myself) but there were no performance improvements like the move from 9x to 2k/XP.
    The kernel behind Vista/Server 08/7 is quite different to the one used in NT/2000/XP.

    Who has said it's a flashier version of Vista?

    No, performance improvements? There was performance improvements namely much, much better memory management, more efficient driver model, SuperFetch, ReadyBoost, I/O improvements, much faster install, etc.
    Daedalus wrote: »
    No MinWin? Why? Is this going to be yet another version of Windows that won't work on the EEE and similar computers, meaning that [strike]we'll[/strike] you'll be using XP, an already seven year old operating system, for the next four or five years?

    lolmicrosoft
    Think. Vista works on UMPC and so on already and do you really think the hardware on low cost laptops, like the EEE, are going to be exactly the same as they are now? Also, do you think MS won't make any improvements to Vista (Windows 7) in this area? People have already gotten Vista working on the original EEE PC too.

    Like I said, think.

    lolatyou

    squirly on
    Diablo2 [US West; Ladder]: *DorianGraph [New/Main] *outsidewhale [Old]
  • JaninJanin Registered User
    edited May 2008
    squirly wrote: »
    That_Guy wrote: »
    They have been using more or less the same kernel since windows nt/2000. WHY IN THE NAME OF HELL CAN THEY NOT DEVELOP A NEW KERNEL AND FILING SYSTEM?!?!! I don't want a flashier version of Vista. Vista is all well and good (I am using it myself) but there were no performance improvements like the move from 9x to 2k/XP.
    The kernel behind Vista/Server 08/7 isn't quit different to the one used in NT/2000/XP.

    Anybody else having trouble figuring out what this sentence means?
    squirly wrote: »
    Who has said it's a flashier version of Vista?

    According to your own links, W7 uses Vista's kernel, file system, and driver layer. The only improvements shown to us are in the interface, and it's gone balls-out crazy with transparency and bubbles.
    squirly wrote: »
    No, performance improvements? There was performance improvements namely much, much better memory management, more efficient driver model, SuperFetch, ReadyBoost, I/O improvements, much faster install, etc.

    And yet, for all those changes, Vista has a larger footprint and heavier requirements than XP. The driver model in particular has caused severe performance issues -- no accelerated sound, low disk throughput when the network is loaded, etc. Improved performance doesn't mean "add more RAM and this will run faster than the old one", it means "will run faster on the same hardware".
    squirly wrote: »
    Daedalus wrote: »
    No MinWin? Why? Is this going to be yet another version of Windows that won't work on the EEE and similar computers, meaning that [strike]we'll[/strike] you'll be using XP, an already seven year old operating system, for the next four or five years?

    lolmicrosoft
    Vista works on UMPC and so on already and do you really think the hardware on low cost laptops, like the EEE, are going to be exactly the same as they are now? Also, do you think MS won't make any improvements to Vista (Windows 7) in this area? People have already gotten Vista working on the original EEE PC too.

    The only information I can find regarding Vista on the EEE suggests that it requires extensive modifcation/reduction of Vista using third-party tools, and using an external USB HDD to install on. As W7 is, according to your links, not including the footprint-reducing features so highly touted earlier in the year I doubt that it will be installable on the EEE without similar hacks and modifications.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I saw the articles earlier this morning and I stopped caring immediately after I read that it would not use MinWin.

    This seems like Windows Vista SP2 with a price tag.

    Jasconius on
  • ecchiecchi Registered User
    edited May 2008
    The only improvements shown to us are in the interface, and it's gone balls-out crazy with transparency and bubbles.
    Where did you see that? Correct me if I'm wrong, but the only bit of the interface we've seen is from right at the start of the multitouch video, and some leaked screens from Milestone 1. Both of those look identical to Vista aside from a couple widget tweaks. Are you talking about these screens? Because those were just made by some guy on DeviantArt.

    MinWin was never intended to be used in Windows. People just misinterpreted it from the start. When MinWin was first shown to the public, the MS guy said, "We've taken a shot recently at stripping out all of the layers above and making sure we had a clean architectural layer there ... This is internal only; you won't see us productizing this, but you can imagine this being used as the basis for products in the future." http://www.istartedsomething.com/20071019/eric-talk-demo-windows-7-minwin/

    ecchi on
  • JaninJanin Registered User
    edited May 2008
    ecchi wrote: »
    The only improvements shown to us are in the interface, and it's gone balls-out crazy with transparency and bubbles.
    Where did you see that? Correct me if I'm wrong, but the only bit of the interface we've seen is from right at the start of the multitouch video, and some leaked screens from Milestone 1. Both of those look identical to Vista aside from a couple widget tweaks. Are you talking about these screens? Because those were just made by some guy on DeviantArt.

    Those are the screens, indeed. Curse you DeviantArt.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • KrayzieKrayzie Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Maybe I'm the minority here, but I'm excited as shit for multi touch, especially since DIY multi touch consoles can be built on the cheap.

    Krayzie on
  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    squirly wrote: »
    Think. Vista works on UMPC and so on already and do you really think the hardware on low cost laptops, like the EEE, are going to be exactly the same as they are now? Also, do you think MS won't make any improvements to Vista (Windows 7) in this area? People have already gotten Vista working on the original EEE PC too.

    Like I said, think.

    lolatyou

    Vista runs absolutely fucking terribly on low-cost hardware, which you'd know if you actually tried to use it and didn't just look at the first google hit for "some Internet dude makes Vista sort of technically run on the Asus EEE, holy shit!"

    As to whether MS will make any improvements in this area, that's what MinWin was! I'm sure they'll put forth some token effort: the EEE initially shipping Linux-only probably had somebody at Microsoft shitting his pants. But it won't be a real solution.

    And no, low-cost laptops aren't going to get much more powerful than they are now by the time Windows 7 releases. They'll get more efficient, lighter, and better on battery life, but they probably won't get much heavier on the CPU, and another of Vista's problems on such hardware is constantly writing to that damn SideBySide file, which is a problem when your only storage is flash.

    Daedalus on
  • squirlysquirly Registered User
    edited May 2008
    > Anybody else having trouble figuring out what this sentence means?

    It says the kernel behind Vista/Server 08/7 is quite different to the one used in NT/2000/XP.

    > According to your own links, W7 uses Vista's kernel, file system, and driver layer. The only improvements shown to us are in the interface, and it's gone balls-out crazy with transparency and bubbles.

    According to my links, it says the W7 kernel is an evolutionary improvement over the one used in Vista. The only improvements shown was a demo of some multi-touch programs.. what the hell else are you talking about?

    > And yet, for all those changes, Vista has a larger footprint and heavier requirements than XP. The driver model in particular has caused severe performance issues -- no accelerated sound, low disk throughput when the network is loaded, etc. Improved performance doesn't mean "add more RAM and this will run faster than the old one", it means "will run faster on the same hardware".

    What, the successor to a 7 year old OS has higher system requirements? Madness! The driver model hasn't caused severe performance issues, bad drivers from Nvidia [and others] caused some performance issues, well, the accelerated sound may be valid but the other things, AFAIK were remedied in SP1 and earlier patches. Vista may not as fast as XP on 5 year old hardware but on 2 <= year old hardware it will run faster.

    > The only information I can find regarding Vista on the EEE suggests that it requires extensive modifcation/reduction of Vista using third-party tools, and using an external USB HDD to install on. As W7 is, according to your links, not including the footprint-reducing features so highly touted earlier in the year I doubt that it will be installable on the EEE without similar hacks and modifications.

    Of course they had to modify it, it's not officially supported at all.What footprint-reducing features were so highly touted earlier in the year? This information is more or less the first we've received about W7 aside from some small comments by people like Gates mentioning "Oh yeah, we're working on performance." Where exactly in my links doesit discuss that?? If it's not officially supported, sure, modifcations will be needed and EEE or some comparable laptop, will be much faster in ~ 2 years.
    Daedalus wrote: »
    Vista runs absolutely fucking terribly on low-cost hardware, which you'd know if you actually tried to use it and didn't just look at the first google hit for "some Internet dude makes Vista sort of technically run on the Asus EEE, holy shit!"

    As to whether MS will make any improvements in this area, that's what MinWin was! I'm sure they'll put forth some token effort: the EEE initially shipping Linux-only probably had somebody at Microsoft shitting his pants. But it won't be a real solution.

    And no, low-cost laptops aren't going to get much more powerful than they are now by the time Windows 7 releases. They'll get more efficient, lighter, and better on battery life, but they probably won't get much heavier on the CPU, and another of Vista's problems on such hardware is constantly writing to that damn SideBySide file, which is a problem when your only storage is flash.
    Maybe, you know, vanilla Vista just isn't for those types of low-cost laptops? Why must it be for everything?

    They've already doubled the RAM in the EEE PC, increased the CPU, etc within ~ 1 year so why wouldn't they continue to make similar upgrades in ~ 2 years? Other ones like the MSI Wind have a 1.6GHZ CPU too..

    Vista also works 'fine' on a ton of UMPCs with similar specs to the EEE PC. For example, the Fujitsu U810 has a 800MHZ CPU and 1GB DDR RAM and it's usable. There are a fair few UMPCs with CPUs twice that speed and with twice that amount of RAM -- do you really think in UMPCs and ultra-low cost laptops there will be next to no noticeable speed improvements, especially with things like the Atom coming out?

    squirly on
    Diablo2 [US West; Ladder]: *DorianGraph [New/Main] *outsidewhale [Old]
  • PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2008
    squirly wrote: »
    So, I can guarantee the performance and driver compatibility problems (Which were incredibly overblown anyway) will not be the slightest problem at all.

    uh huh.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited May 2008
    It says the kernel behind Vista/Server 08/7 isn't quit different to the one used in NT/2000/XP.

    I am reminded of the writings of Douglas Adams.

    "Not entirely unlike tea".

    Jasconius on
  • FyreWulffFyreWulff Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2008
    Pheezer wrote: »
    squirly wrote: »
    So, I can guarantee the performance and driver compatibility problems (Which were incredibly overblown anyway) will not be the slightest problem at all.

    uh huh.

    They're not changing how drivers work. Vista drivers will work on 7.

    This is versus how Vista completely changed how they worked between XP and Vista.

    FyreWulff on
  • typhoontyphoon Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    That_Guy wrote: »
    They have been using more or less the same kernel since windows nt/2000. WHY IN THE NAME OF HELL CAN THEY NOT DEVELOP A NEW KERNEL AND FILING SYSTEM?!?!!
    Honest question: what's wrong with the Windows Vista kernel or NTFS? I think keeping them mostly unchanged for Windows 7 is a good idea, since it'll help them make a faster release and let them focus on things that actually affect user experience. I mean, what do you want, another goddamn driver model?

    That was a pretty boring demo, though; nothing we haven't seen before, nothing that's actually going to make anyone more productive. It's been obvious for a while now that the talented people at Microsoft simply aren't working on Windows. Which makes sense, since Microsoft isn't in any danger of losing their market position and don't need to risk very much to maintain it. They have two years to work on it, of course, but what a bizarrely uninspiring way to get the Windows 7 train rolling.

    typhoon on
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    I can say Vista is certainly an improvement over XP performance wise. It just isn't leaps and bounds better.

    AbsoluteZero on
    cs6f034fsffl.jpg
  • squirlysquirly Registered User
    edited May 2008
    From the surface, it isn't, but underneath, it is. :)

    squirly on
    Diablo2 [US West; Ladder]: *DorianGraph [New/Main] *outsidewhale [Old]
  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    squirly wrote: »
    Maybe, you know, vanilla Vista just isn't for those types of low-cost laptops? Why must it be for everything?

    Oh hey, I'm just fine with that. People not wanting XP now that its support lifespan is almost up and going with the Linux versions instead is a good thing in my book. I just didn't think that Microsoft felt the same way.

    Daedalus on
  • devoirdevoir Registered User
    edited May 2008
    squirly wrote: »
    > Anybody else having trouble figuring out what this sentence means?

    It says the kernel behind Vista/Server 08/7 isn't quit different to the one used in NT/2000/XP.

    Sorry, mate, but this is really unclear. What you are trying to say, I believe, is:

    "The kernel behind Windows 7/Vista/Server 08/ is quite different to the one used in NT/2000/XP."

    Because it is.

    devoir on
  • electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    You know what'd be great? If Microsoft would step the fuck up to the plate and do something new and interesting. WinFS was genuinely interesting because as far as I can tell there's no other file system like it out there on any platform (eagerly awaiting links).

    Also MS have no idea how to do user interfaces these days - everything I've seen looks hideously cluttered.

    electricitylikesme on
  • IdolisideIdoliside Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Yeah that windows looks horrible. Im still getting used to Vista's odd transparencies and big icons. Those just look horrible, but on the flipside very customisable.
    Sod multi-touch, give us WinFS.

    Idoliside on
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  • squirlysquirly Registered User
    edited May 2008
    devoir, yup, a typo.

    electricitylikesme, fun fact: WinFS wasn't a 'file system.'

    Idoliside, why do you want WinFS so badly?


    What is interesting is that most people who clamour for WinFS and about the atrocity that was wrought on this great world when it was chosen to not be apart of Longhorn (Vista) tend to know nothing about it. Another fun fact, much of the underlying technologies have shipped in various forms/products and Allchin said that with Vista they achieved a fair few things they wanted to with WinFS (From a surface, consumer point of view and in some other regard - I listened to it a long time ago).

    So, why do you people want WinFS so badly now? I mean, many of it's goals have been capable for some time, for example, the web has become a place for some of your data to live (Like contacts) so why bother with a local file with the intricacies WinFS would've brought? Another is desktop search (File indexing program), with Microsoft's desktop search products, Apple's Spotlight, Google's Desktop Search, the million Linux ones, etc it kind of made what MS wanted to do with WinFS too complex than it needed to be. One more example is why was WinFS needed for media files when programs like iTunes, Zune, WMP, etc seem to handle it fine?

    With Vista you can sort by genre, artist, etc which gives us the surface sorting capabilities WinFS would've provided. Also, if you consider the related work they've put into SQL Server and other things you can see they're quite on their way to their WinFS vision. Seriously, once you look at what WinFS was going to be and what we have now, it seems silly to make violent proclamations that MS should bring 'WinFS' (It feels weird treating it as if it's a single entity, it's felt weird for years) back. There's also other things like SQLite being used in apps (Amarok, FF, etc) which is similar in some regards. Another thing to consider is Live Mesh.

    The problem WinFS was going to solve has been solved, more or less. So, please, do tell, why do you want the mythical 'WinFS'?

    (I have a [new] audio file to listen to that covers a lot about WinFS and where it is now too so I may update this post even more. Also, thank you PG/OSN and everyone forgive me for any technical mistakes in this post, it's late D:)

    (You could shorten those paragraphs to 'Shut up about WinFS, seriously, shut up' if you desire to :P)

    squirly on
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  • AzioAzio Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    You know what'd be great? If Microsoft would step the fuck up to the plate and do something new and interesting. WinFS was genuinely interesting because as far as I can tell there's no other file system like it out there on any platform (eagerly awaiting links).
    You should at least skim Wikipedia before you start posting about things you don't understand. WinFS was/is not a file system.

    Azio on
  • MorskittarMorskittar Registered User regular
    edited May 2008
    Azio wrote: »
    You know what'd be great? If Microsoft would step the fuck up to the plate and do something new and interesting. WinFS was genuinely interesting because as far as I can tell there's no other file system like it out there on any platform (eagerly awaiting links).
    You should at least skim Wikipedia before you start posting about things you don't understand. WinFS was/is not a file system.

    Azio, maybe you should go skim CNet comments and watch a few Mac ads to understand the truth about Vista.

    Geez...

    In all seriousness, I'm kind of excited to see where this new video driver model goes after another revision. We're a year and a half after a fundamental revision to the driver model and Vista is already starting to (marginally) outperform XP (on some systems). A Win 7 "core install" with the next generations of new drivers could be an awesome gaming platform.

    Assuming Server Core makes it back to Windows client.

    Morskittar on
    snm_sig.jpg
  • DigDug2000DigDug2000 Registered User
    edited May 2008
    squirly wrote: »
    The problem WinFS was going to solve has been solved, more or less. So, please, do tell, why do you want the mythical 'WinFS'?
    I think the thing that sounds interesting about WinFS is for apps to be able to request things from the OS. For instance, Apps should just be able to put out a request for all of the my photos and get them. In fact, the one thing that's always shown when they're demoing this stuff is asking for a contact and all the pictures of that contact, not from Desktop Search, but from within a program where I'm dealing with that person.

    I dunno. That sounds nice to me as a user. I don't like having to wonder if I'm going to have to retag everything if I want to switch to a different contact/calendar/music/whatever program. I'd like to tag something once and have it propagate everywhere. I haven't seen much of that make it into real products though for any OS. The closest thing we have right now is Metadata stuck in MP3 or Pictures files, which really isn't the same thing.

    DigDug2000 on
  • ecchiecchi Registered User
    edited May 2008
    Are you familiar with the property system in Vista? Essentially, Microsoft/developers write shell extensions called property handlers that become attached to specific file extensions. Applications (including Explorer) query the property system to get metadata from files. For example, instead of writing an mp3 tagging app, you can write a music tagging app that can tag MP3, WMA, etc with the same code. The property handlers do the dirty work of reading and writing the file's own metadata, and provide a generic interface with fields for pretty much any property type imaginable (and I think you can add more if you really want). I wrote a handler for M4A files in a couple days, and now Indexing and Explorer treat them exactly like they already treat MP3s.

    ecchi on
  • ecchiecchi Registered User
    edited June 2008
    Okay, so D6 was worthless. Last week though Microsoft announced some details of its PDC presentations for this October:
    Windows 7: Graphics Advances
    Windows 7 enables you to advance the graphics capabilities of your applications while carrying forward existing investments in your Win32 codebase, including GDI and GDI+. New enhancements to DirectX let Win32 applications harness the latest innovations in GPUs and LCD displays, including support for scalable, high-performance, 2D and 3D graphics, text, and images. Also learn how to leverage the GPU's parallelism for general-purpose computation such as image processing.

    Windows 7: Optimizing for Energy Efficiency and Battery Life
    A single application can reduce mobile battery life by up to 30%. Windows 7 provides advances for building energy-efficient applications. In this session we will discuss how to leverage new Windows infrastructure to reduce application power consumption and efficiently schedule background tasks and services.

    Windows 7: Touch Computing
    In Windows 7, innovative touch and gesture support will enable more direct and natural interaction in your applications. This session will highlight the new multi-touch gesture APIs and explain how you can leverage them in your applications.

    Windows 7: Web Services in Native Code

    Windows 7 introduces a new networking API with support for building SOAP based web services in native code. This session will discuss the programming model, interoperability aspects with other implementations of WS-* protocols and demonstrate various services and applications built using this API.
    Not gonna lie, I have no idea whether that's all buzzwords or if there's actually anything interesting going on there. The graphics stuff seems to be building off of the new WPF shader support -- it's good to see MS finally taking advantage of desktop compositing instead of just leaving us with Flip3d. Energy efficiency is always good, and Vista was already a nice improvement in this area, so I'm interested in that (though the presentation will probably boil down to "don't use busy waits!"). I've never been a big fan of mash-ups or any of that but maybe someone will find a use for the SOAP stuff.

    ecchi on
  • imbalancedimbalanced Registered User
    edited June 2008
    ecchi wrote: »
    Not gonna lie, I have no idea whether that's all buzzwords or if there's actually anything interesting going on there. The graphics stuff seems to be building off of the new WPF shader support -- it's good to see MS finally taking advantage of desktop compositing instead of just leaving us with Flip3d. Energy efficiency is always good, and Vista was already a nice improvement in this area, so I'm interested in that (though the presentation will probably boil down to "don't use busy waits!"). I've never been a big fan of mash-ups or any of that but maybe someone will find a use for the SOAP stuff.

    Well the company I work for does all of its data integration through SOAP, so being able to integrate with an actual client platform would be really neat depending on how Microsoft implements it. I remain slightly pessimistic though.

    imbalanced on
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  • JasconiusJasconius sword criminal mad onlineRegistered User regular
    edited June 2008
    SOAP is handy if you are building enterprise software that eats up data from outside sources (that happen to deliver SOAP). But the .NET Framework already has a lot of support for SOAP... I don't know what they are adding, if anything, or if they are just porting the same stuff from .NET over to Win32.

    But SOAP... I mean, there's not a whole lot of use cases for it. If you are controlling and delivering your data internally and you choose to build your data layer with web services then you are quite crazy or you just like slow programs.

    But Microsoft making bullet points about mashup related garbage does not surprise me, that's also one of the big bullet points of IE8 (even though the functionality is wonky, IE8 wonky? Say it isn't so).

    I have not and don't think I will ever understand mashups.

    Jasconius on
  • DeathPrawnDeathPrawn Registered User
    edited June 2008
    DigDug2000 wrote: »
    squirly wrote: »
    The problem WinFS was going to solve has been solved, more or less. So, please, do tell, why do you want the mythical 'WinFS'?
    I think the thing that sounds interesting about WinFS is for apps to be able to request things from the OS. For instance, Apps should just be able to put out a request for all of the my photos and get them. In fact, the one thing that's always shown when they're demoing this stuff is asking for a contact and all the pictures of that contact, not from Desktop Search, but from within a program where I'm dealing with that person.

    I dunno. That sounds nice to me as a user. I don't like having to wonder if I'm going to have to retag everything if I want to switch to a different contact/calendar/music/whatever program. I'd like to tag something once and have it propagate everywhere. I haven't seen much of that make it into real products though for any OS. The closest thing we have right now is Metadata stuck in MP3 or Pictures files, which really isn't the same thing.

    I don't know what specific differences there are in the implementation, but OS X essentially already has this functionality. If I add somebody's IM screen name to their Address Book entry, and then add that screen name to my buddy list in Adium (a 3rd party program, no less) their alias in Adium is automatically changed to their real name and their buddy icon becomes their address book picture.

    DeathPrawn on
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  • DaedalusDaedalus Registered User regular
    edited June 2008
    DeathPrawn wrote: »
    DigDug2000 wrote: »
    squirly wrote: »
    The problem WinFS was going to solve has been solved, more or less. So, please, do tell, why do you want the mythical 'WinFS'?
    I think the thing that sounds interesting about WinFS is for apps to be able to request things from the OS. For instance, Apps should just be able to put out a request for all of the my photos and get them. In fact, the one thing that's always shown when they're demoing this stuff is asking for a contact and all the pictures of that contact, not from Desktop Search, but from within a program where I'm dealing with that person.

    I dunno. That sounds nice to me as a user. I don't like having to wonder if I'm going to have to retag everything if I want to switch to a different contact/calendar/music/whatever program. I'd like to tag something once and have it propagate everywhere. I haven't seen much of that make it into real products though for any OS. The closest thing we have right now is Metadata stuck in MP3 or Pictures files, which really isn't the same thing.

    I don't know what specific differences there are in the implementation, but OS X essentially already has this functionality. If I add somebody's IM screen name to their Address Book entry, and then add that screen name to my buddy list in Adium (a 3rd party program, no less) their alias in Adium is automatically changed to their real name and their buddy icon becomes their address book picture.

    Gnome and KDE both have similar functionality under Linux, although like anything in Linux, it works perfectly most of the time but sometimes violently explodes.

    Daedalus on
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