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Vampires, Witches and Werewolves...in love!

Peter PrinciplePeter Principle Registered User regular
edited September 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
I remember reading about a series of books that was aimed at the tweens/young adult market and the central theme was about an alternate world where magic and vampires and werewolves exist and they're like teenages in love and that sort of thing. I was thinking that my daughter (11, soon to be 12) might like this series, but I can't for the life of me remember where I read about this or more importantly what the name of the books or series or the author was. Also, would this be an appropriate book for someone in that age group? I'd rather not buy her a bodice ripper, but I'm pretty sure this series of stories is pretty tame.

Help with ID'ing this series and if it's age appropriate, please?

"A man is likely to mind his own business when it is worth minding. When it is not, he takes his mind off his own meaningless affairs by minding other people's business." - Eric Hoffer, _The True Believer_
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    Thirty-3Thirty-3 [E] robcd Melbourne, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Could be the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twilight_series

    I haven't read it myself, so I couldn't say whether or not it was appropriate. ;-)

    Thirty-3 on
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    urahonkyurahonky Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Hah. I was at my friend's house last night and his gf was reading Twilight. But I think that's different from the OP is asking for. Apparently Twilight is about a girl falling in love with a guy, who turns out to be a Vampire.

    urahonky on
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    TarantioTarantio Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    It's definitely not the same, but it does remind me of a book I read years ago: H.O.W.L. High.

    Kid going to school for special effects, father (or grandfather?) was a real magician, there are ghosts involved. I do remember enjoying it.

    Tarantio on
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    hoodie13hoodie13 punch bro Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Tarantio wrote: »
    It's definitely not the same, but it does remind me of a book I read years ago: H.O.W.L. High.

    Kid going to school for special effects, father (or grandfather?) was a real magician, there are ghosts involved. I do remember enjoying it.

    I remember that!

    Anyone read Creepsville, the series that was kinda like Goosebumps but way better, by Christopher Pike? I liked that. Was pretty cool

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    tallgeezetallgeeze Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I was thinking of Twighlight as well. My 11 yr old sister is into it and says good things about it.

    A quick google search came up with "Women of the Otherworld" series by Kelley Armstrong

    here is the wiki link:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women_of_the_Otherworld

    It pretty much describes what you are talking about. I hope that is it, Peter.

    tallgeeze on
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    codetrapcodetrap Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Are you maybe thinking of the Anita Blake series?

    codetrap on
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    no way in hell should a child read anita blake. its a step below porn. crazy fucked up porn

    mts on
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    codetrapcodetrap Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    mts wrote: »
    no way in hell should a child read anita blake. its a step below porn. crazy fucked up porn

    Well.. um... ok. I can see that.

    codetrap on
    < insert witty comment here>
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    my wife got hooked on it early on, and she wound up reading the entire series (at least what was on paperback at the time) so it progressively gets worse and worse, but since she was reading it from teh begining, she kind of got sensitized to it. well the latest book finally comes out in paperback and she reads it, and her response. man i feel dirty. or somethign to that effect. the best part is the dedication was obvious she got dumped because they thought she was fucked up in the head for what she wrote.

    mts on
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    Peter PrinciplePeter Principle Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Thirty-3 wrote: »
    Could be the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twilight_series

    I haven't read it myself, so I couldn't say whether or not it was appropriate. ;-)

    Yep, it's the Twilight series. OK for younger kids?

    Peter Principle on
    "A man is likely to mind his own business when it is worth minding. When it is not, he takes his mind off his own meaningless affairs by minding other people's business." - Eric Hoffer, _The True Believer_
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    tallgeezetallgeeze Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Thirty-3 wrote: »
    Could be the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twilight_series

    I haven't read it myself, so I couldn't say whether or not it was appropriate. ;-)

    Yep, it's the Twilight series. OK for younger kids?

    My 11 yr old sister loves it. I was surprised how thick that book was when she showed it to me. I bought it and the 2nd book in the series for her. She was very happy.

    tallgeeze on
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    HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Thirty-3 wrote: »
    Could be the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twilight_series

    I haven't read it myself, so I couldn't say whether or not it was appropriate. ;-)

    Yep, it's the Twilight series. OK for younger kids?

    Not sure about the content. I do know a big fan of the series, and have had to put up with her whining for a few weeks: The author recently threw a fit that a proofreader leaked spoilers for the next book in the series and is refusing to finish it (despite movie deals and so forth). Not sure if I'd recommend getting into the series under the circumstances.

    Hevach on
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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    its fine for little kids, nothing bad in it language or otherwise. its a good read, she uses some high level vocabulary at times though

    mts on
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    Toxin01Toxin01 Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    They aren't to great of books either.

    Toxin01 on
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    SpecularitySpecularity Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    No, the Twilight series is not high literature or anything, but they're super readable, and, as a future English teacher, I support anything that gets kids reading. I'd say they're appropriate for someone your daughter's age; the author is heavily religious, I believe, and so there's no flagrant sex or partying (in fact, the only sex in the entire series is implied, and only occurs after a marriage [third book]). Good wholesome fantasy for the whole family!

    Oh, and there are vampires and werewolves in it, both.

    Specularity on
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    Peter PrinciplePeter Principle Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    mts wrote: »
    its fine for little kids, nothing bad in it language or otherwise. its a good read, she uses some high level vocabulary at times though

    Perfect.

    Peter Principle on
    "A man is likely to mind his own business when it is worth minding. When it is not, he takes his mind off his own meaningless affairs by minding other people's business." - Eric Hoffer, _The True Believer_
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    BeckBeck Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Hevach wrote: »
    Thirty-3 wrote: »
    Could be the Twilight series by Stephenie Meyer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twilight_series

    I haven't read it myself, so I couldn't say whether or not it was appropriate. ;-)

    Yep, it's the Twilight series. OK for younger kids?

    Not sure about the content. I do know a big fan of the series, and have had to put up with her whining for a few weeks: The author recently threw a fit that a proofreader leaked spoilers for the next book in the series and is refusing to finish it (despite movie deals and so forth). Not sure if I'd recommend getting into the series under the circumstances.
    Twilight is the most awful series, but great for young girls. My 13 year old sister really likes the series, and so do all of her friends.

    It's mainly written as an excuse to describe Edward's (the sexy vampire dude dating the main character) muscles, hair, etc. Nothing inappropriate. Okay, maybe it's not mainly written for that, but as a 19 year old male I'm obligated to hate it!

    Beck on
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    TachTach Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Per my wife and mother-in-law, the last Twilight book is definitely NOT for kids. There's some pretty disturbingly visceral imagery in there, and it made my wife a little ill.

    Tach on
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    Toxin01Toxin01 Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Tach wrote: »
    Per my wife and mother-in-law, the last Twilight book is definitely NOT for kids. There's some pretty disturbingly visceral imagery in there, and it made my wife a little ill.

    Snap, my sister reads this stuff.

    Can I get an example?

    Toxin01 on
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    TachTach Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Toxin01 wrote: »
    Tach wrote: »
    Per my wife and mother-in-law, the last Twilight book is definitely NOT for kids. There's some pretty disturbingly visceral imagery in there, and it made my wife a little ill.

    Snap, my sister reads this stuff.

    Can I get an example?
    One bit about a human giving birth to a vampire baby- in extremely graphic detail. Bodily mutilation of the mother and such. NOT for kids, I'd imagine. Amazon had some pretty harsh reviews of it, I was told.

    Tach on
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    CristoCristo Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    No, the Twilight series is not high literature or anything, but they're super readable, and, as a future English teacher, I support anything that gets kids reading.

    Even if it's vapid bullshit?

    Honestly, have you seen some of the fans and how twisted these girls get? There's no way I'd let my daughter or son read that crap. I read the first book and I felt dirty. Really dirty. It's not the best track to get your kid who's just starting to really read as a past-time on. The vocabulary is not "highbrow" or the like, it's pretty plain and simple and the characters are woefully boring and amazingly perfect.

    Get her to read something decent, as a 10 year old when I really started reading I started out with Northern Lights, and subsequently Subtle Knife and The Amber Spyglass which makes up the trilogy of Northern Lights. That gently eased me into reading very nicely and I've been an avid reader ever since, and it's not just for boys it's pretty unisex.

    Here's an example of the awful purple prose: The bouquets of brilliant anemones undulated ceaselessly in the invisible current…

    Honestly, Twilight Saga is trash. Nevermind the plethora of 14 year old girls creaming themselves ove Edward Cullen.

    http://www.new.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2372676663

    Sorry if I come across a little overbearing and aggressive, but I REALLY dislike this series and feel it is most undeserving of the attention and popularity it's gaining.

    Cristo on
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    ToothcakeToothcake Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    The Twilight series has been making it's rounds among folks that I work with, and with the exception of this latest book they say that it's pretty tame. I don't have any interest in the series, but they seems to love the shit out of it.

    And ha, Christopher Pike. My brother was an avid fan of the Last Vampire.

    Toothcake on
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    BeckBeck Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Tach wrote: »
    Toxin01 wrote: »
    Tach wrote: »
    Per my wife and mother-in-law, the last Twilight book is definitely NOT for kids. There's some pretty disturbingly visceral imagery in there, and it made my wife a little ill.

    Snap, my sister reads this stuff.

    Can I get an example?
    One bit about a human giving birth to a vampire baby- in extremely graphic detail. Bodily mutilation of the mother and such. NOT for kids, I'd imagine. Amazon had some pretty harsh reviews of it, I was told.

    Is it really that graphic? I mean, if books are too safe, they're not fun to read for kids. Like, some dude in the last Chronicles of Narnia book gets gored by a Unicorn and I read that when i was nine or ten.

    Beck on
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    ruzkinruzkin Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Twilight is trash through and through. Whatever happened to getting kids to read REAL books? 12 is old enough for Harper Lee or Steinbeck or even some Vonnegut.

    ruzkin on
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    noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Yea. God forbid kids read something fun.

    noir_blood on
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    GanluanGanluan Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Haha what the hell is up with the pretentiousness in here. Them reading those books beats the hell out of watching TV or something.

    I know I read Hardy Boys and Goosebumps when I was a kid, and those weren't exactly Pulitzer Prize winners.

    Ganluan on
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    KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Ganluan wrote: »
    Haha what the hell is up with the pretentiousness in here. Them reading those books beats the hell out of watching TV or something.

    I know I read Hardy Boys and Goosebumps when I was a kid, and those weren't exactly Pulitzer Prize winners.

    Same here. I read tons of "fluff" books in middle school as a kid, but that sparked my love for reading and got me used to actually reading. I remember actually reading instead of watching tv.

    Kyougu on
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    CristoCristo Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I read Northern Lights, read that!!

    Just for the love of God and All things Holy, not Twilight.

    Anything but that.

    Cristo on
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    KartanKartan Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Cristo wrote: »
    I read Northern Lights, read that!!

    Just for the love of God and All things Holy, not Twilight.

    Anything but that.

    Agreed.
    I mean, the plot of Twilight has the guy tell the girl to stay away from him because he isn't "safe", and then he goes to her house, breaks into her room and watches her sleep. And this is shown as a sign of "true love". Later on, a werewolf apparently "imprints" (read: marries) the protagonists daughter right after she was born. So...yeah.

    Kartan on
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    RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I'm sure it's fine for an 11-yr-old girl--I have not read it, but the reviews I have read tend to concentrate on the somewhat unenlightened portrayal of girls. It's definitely not about "girl power," for sure. And apparently there is much heavy petting but no sex really. The impression I get is that it's basically a bodice-ripper with vampires, and written towards teen girls.

    RUNN1NGMAN on
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    LoneIgadzraLoneIgadzra Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Twilight is basically just dark, addictive garbage, and there are much better series if that's all you want.

    The prose style is nonexistent, and half the "romance" scenes are just copy-pasted and chiefly distinguished by being scenes in which the same words are used to describe physical attributes over and over and over. I haven't read the second book, but the first one did get much better once the shit hit the fan about 2/3 of the way through. All in all, it bore a striking resemblance, in plot structure, to a shoujo manga.

    I don't really like dark books though, maybe it's just me but even if they're terrible I find them hard to get out of my head, and Twilight was no exception. Also, I'm 22. So my projected assumption is that young girls shouldn't read this.

    The problem with Twilight is not so much the gore (at least the first book had little of it) as the fact that it reads like a fanfiction. That is to say, when reading it it just feels like you're lost in this meandering plot that's getting all the right hooks so you're totally into it but is basically going nowhere fast, events don't always build on each other, and keeps teasing at stuff that never quite happens. Reading it is like how I imagine purgatory, and this is what chiefly makes the experience dark - not the content. I find that this feeling actually messes with my state of mind in an undesirable way, hence my recommendation.

    But really, my fears are probably unfounded. I read a lot of shit novels when I was young (Young Jedi Knights anyone?) that I eventually recognized to be terrible on my own.

    LoneIgadzra on
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    HevachHevach Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    The prose style is nonexistent, and half the "romance" scenes are just copy-pasted and chiefly distinguished by being scenes in which the same words are used to describe physical attributes over and over and over.

    This pretty much describes Fanny Hill, which is widely considered great classical literature.

    I swear, I'd read the words "marvelous machine of the gender" entirely too many times before I finished that paper.

    Hevach on
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    DHS OdiumDHS Odium Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I had to read Twilight (only the first book) in college because we had to make a trailer for a movie version (before the movie was announced or in the works). It was for a video editing class to also teach about pacing, and the trailer was going to be put online for younger kids to watch to get a visual gist of a story to see if they were interested in the various books on the site.

    It was alright. Not great, I would say highly readable though, in the same vein of Harry Potter in that a lot of fluff is gone and fairly lean (I grew up on Tolkien). I felt the characters were highly unrealistic, like someone said, they were all perfect. A lot of the book just describing how beautiful this dude is, I guess that's why girls like it. I'm not sure 11 is a great age for it, I'd say 13 and up. I was personally disappointed at the lack of sex in there, right I'm to believe a vampire stuck in his teens for hundreds of years doesn't want to get it on with this girl? Bullshit. I guess that's good for the target audience though.

    I have a cousin that's like 15 maybe? I dunno, anyways she loves the series. I'm sure it would be a welcome gift, though I'd recommend Harry Potter if it hasn't been read yet, though later on they get dark too.

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    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    one complaint about the first couple twilight series, is it builds up waiting for something big to happen, but nothing happens. at least not until the 3rd book, but you felt like you had to keep reading since it always seemed like it was going to happen in the next chapter and by the end you have already commited too much time to go without that somethng happening

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    LoneIgadzraLoneIgadzra Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Oh yeah and the main character is a pretty blatant Mary Sue, forgot to mention that. :)

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    Toxin01Toxin01 Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Mary who?

    Toxin01 on
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    BoutrosBoutros Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    For what it's worth my 28 year old, mother of two, lawyer sister is borderline obsessed with these books and the movie that is coming out soon.

    Boutros on
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    noir_bloodnoir_blood Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Oh yeah and the main character is a pretty blatant Mary Sue, forgot to mention that. :)


    Basically any character that is obviously written by the author solely as wish fullfillment.

    noir_blood on
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    Toxin01Toxin01 Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    noir_blood wrote: »
    Oh yeah and the main character is a pretty blatant Mary Sue, forgot to mention that. :)


    Basically any character that is obviously written by the author solely as wish fullfillment.

    Han solo?

    Toxin01 on
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    GM: Rusty Chains (DH Ongoing)
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    SlickShughesSlickShughes Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Toxin01 wrote: »
    noir_blood wrote: »
    Oh yeah and the main character is a pretty blatant Mary Sue, forgot to mention that. :)


    Basically any character that is obviously written by the author solely as wish fullfillment.

    Han solo?

    Skywalker is the more blatant Mary Sue (uh, Gary Stu is the male version I think?).

    My wife - supervisor at a Borders who is obsessed with these - says the main character is 17, and it's more appropriate for kids closer to that age, but could work for as young as 11 or 12. The fourth book is a bit edgier. They're categorized as YA - young adult - which is intended for middle school/high school.

    SlickShughes on
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