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Cooking on a college budget

EupfhoriaEupfhoria Registered User regular
edited September 2008 in Debate and/or Discourse
(Not sure if this topic maybe should've gone elsewhere, so feel free to move if necessary, mods)

I recently started writing a weekly column for my community college's newspaper on cooking, with a focus on cheap and easy to make meals. I started with a really basic way to make spaghetti and meat sauce. I mean I'm talking 'cooking for retards' basic here; boil water; put pasta in. Brown some ground beef, add garlic/onion/pepper/mushrooms, pour in tomato sauce, now pour the sauce on the pasta kinda basic.

I started the column after seeing another student's story about how people have been setting fire alarms off in the dorms attempting to make shit as easy as top ramen. Yes, attempting and failing to make some top fucking ramen.

Now that doesn't mean I wouldn't welcome recipes for stuff that take at least a modicum of ability to make, but keep in mind that the idea is to keep it fairly simple, and also inexpensive (i.e., around $15-ish)

So, PA chefs, lets get some ideas started! (thanks in advance to anyone who contributes, btw)

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Posts

  • KilroyKilroy timaeusTestified Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Try the Cooking Thread.

    Or maybe H/A.

    Kilroy on
  • L*2*G*XL*2*G*X Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    ingredients:
    onion,
    chicken,
    mushrooms, a handfull per person
    garlic,
    frozen peas, a small box
    salt,
    pepper,

    and either
    instant noodles, a package per person
    or rice, a small handfull per person


    the easiest way to dice an onion: cut in half from top to bottom. Peel the brown layers off, take one extra layer off for easy removal. Place each half on the cutting board. Take the first half placing your fingers on the wide part. Cut off the top and bottom. With a very sharp knife slice from top to bottom, parallel. Keep a hold on the onion. Now cut across from top to bottom. The onion will start coming apart, don't worry, keep cutting, moving your fingers down until you're done. Repeat on the second part.

    Put a teaspoon oil in frying pan big enough to hold twice your ingredients. Wait till it's hot, but not boiling hot. Keep in mind boiling oil is a lot hotter than water, it will pop, crackle and burn your onion, or even you.
    You can test by putting a drop of water on a knife point and carefully putting it in the oil. If it pops, let the oil cool down. You'll learn to recognize the right temperature by the smell.
    Add the diced onion. Stir the onion occasionally.

    Take chicken breast, cut it lengthwise, then across. Never cut chicken without immediatly washing your knife and cutting board with very hot water. If possible, reserve a board for only chicken, and keep it clean and dry.

    Your onion should be glassy now (I hope you kept stirring) and smell and taste sweet. Don't taste raw onion if you're on a date!

    Add the chicken, then sprinkle salt an pepper on it (half a teaspoon each), stir once in a while. Too much stirring will make the chicken cool down rather than fry.

    Put on the water for your rice or noodles. Keep an eye on it and add the rice/noodles as soon as it boils.

    Wash the mushrooms. I don't care what your cookbook says, they need to be washed. Open the tap, take the mushrooms one by one, and wipe them clean with your fingertips under the running water. Place them aside to leak off/dry.
    The faster you work the better, but don't forget to stir and check the water for the rice/noodles.

    Wait till all the parts of the chicken look white. Now is a good time to try for a crust: heat the pan up until you hear pops, then stir like a madman. See that crunchy brown goodness?

    Lower the fire and pull a clove off the garlic. Cut of the top and bottom, then cut slightly along the skin. It should peel off easily. Dice the garlic like a miniature version of the onion. Add to the mix.

    Now take a mushroom. Cut it in half and drop in, then repeat with the next one. Stir in between adding the mushrooms.
    When they have all been added, stir until you like the look of them: mushrooms don't take long. Then switch off the fire.

    Add frozen peas untill the mix looks good.

    When the rice or noodles are done-just follow the instructions on the package, mix them and fire up the fire one last time. Stir vigorously until everything is greasy and well mixed.

    Shut of the fire, wash your knife and cutting board, serve.

    L*2*G*X on
  • amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    2-4 tilapia fillets
    2 cups cheese puffs (not cheetos, get the puffy ones)
    2 cups panko (it's a breadcrumb like substance in the flour section)
    Flour, on a plate
    2 eggs, or egg beaters substitute (I like using eggs, but the substitute is easier)
    Oregano, Sea Salt, Black pepper, thyme, basil, garlic powder, lemon pepper, or any other seasoning you really like
    1-2 cups grits (not instant grits, but the kind you get in the tubes)
    Shredded cheese
    A few tablespoons of vegetable oil

    Crush the cheese puffs with your fingertips into a fine powderlike topping
    Mix with the panko and seasonings
    Heat a skillet on medium to medium high with the oil, coating the pan evenly
    Dip the fillets in the flour, coating both sides a soft white, then dip into the egg or egg substitute (make sure to whisk the eggs if you use real eggs, obviously)
    Dip the fillet in the panko mix, coating both sides, press down lightly to adhere.

    Cook about 5 minutes on both sides, flipping once. The fish will be light and flaky when done

    In a cooking pot, heat a few cups of water to boiling, then add the grits. Stir well then set the heat to low until the water absorbs completely. Once done, mix in the shredded cheese and seasonings to personal taste.

    Voila!

    Cheese crusted tilapia with grits. Very, very tasty, and cheap too! (serving 2-4 people for under $30)

    The breadding mix also works well for pork chops

    amateurhour on
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  • QinguQingu Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Fried pasta is delicious and super-cheap.

    Ingredients
    • 1 cup of penne pasta
    • 1/2 small onion, sliced
    • 1 tablespoon butter
    • Parmesan cheese
    • 1/2 teaspoon salt
    • Boiling water

    Directions
    1. Bring a pot or kettle of water to a boil.

    2. Meanwhile, melt butter over medium-high heat in a skillet. Add onion and saute until beginning to carmelize. Add pasta to the skillet and stir for about a minute, until pasta is coated in butter.

    3. Add boiling water to cover the pasta, and salt, and continue to cook, uncovered, stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes, until pasta is al dente. Add more water bit by bit as necessary. You don't want any liquid in the pan as the pasta finishes cooking. Add parmesan and pepper to taste and eat.

    Note: If you have dry vermouth (very cheap), I like to add some in near the end of the pasta cooking instead of water. You could also throw in a minced garlic clove with the pasta in step 2.

    Qingu on
  • Rhesus PositiveRhesus Positive GNU Terry Pratchett Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Qingu, you have intrigued me, and I will definitely use that recipe when I get back to university.

    My contribution:

    Peanut Butter Pasta

    Ingredients:
    Enough pasta for a meal - say a cup
    One large or two small onions, chopped
    Dollop of peanut butter
    Chilli sauce (I use Encona - probably the most expensive thing in my kitchen)
    Oil for sautéing

    Directions:
    1) Start the pasta cooking. If you don't know how to do that, my method is to bring water with a splash of olive oil and a little salt to a boil, then add the pasta.

    2) Fry the onions in the oil until they're soft.

    3) Add the peanut butter, and keep stirring on a reduced heat to melt it. Add the chilli sauce to taste.

    4) When the pasta is done to your liking (I prefer al dente, or chewy), drain and add to the peanut butter. Keep stirring until coated.

    5) Eat.


    You'll notice that my cooking doesn't consider portion size to be an exact science, but it's cheap, quick and can be made with ingredients that won't go off if you only cook occasionally. It also tastes just as good cold, so you can Tupperware it up and take it in to classes if you study a distance away from where you live.

    Rhesus Positive on
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  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    If you can't make ramen I think you fail at life.

    Anyways... try making ramen noodles, strain the water out and season the noodles with different spices your roommates might have in the cabinets. I used to put taco seasoning and cheese on mine, and it was damn good.

    AbsoluteZero on
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  • MedopineMedopine __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2008
    If you crack an egg into your boiling water right before you put ramen noodles in, it is tasty

    Medopine on
  • DarkDragoonDarkDragoon Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I'd say various egg recipes might be a good idea, seeing as how cheap you can get them by them by the dozen. I've become kind of partial to boiling a bunch of eggs and refrigerating them in a ziplock bag. Then, whenever it's lunch time, I just take one out, crumble it up between two slices of bread, put some may on, and sprinkle some cheese over it. Bam, instant egg sandwich, and it shouldn't cost any more than $5-6 to make a weeks worth of the stuff.

    Spicy Black Beans and Rice are pretty good and cheap, too.

    Ingredients:
    1 14-oz can of diced tomatoes (preferably spicy, but plain works too)
    1 onion
    1 can of black beans (again, spiced is good, though plain is fine)
    1 clove of garlic (optional)
    1-2+ cups of rice (I'd say about a cup per person


    The Rice: In a saucepan, bring about 4 cups of water per intended cup of rice to boil. Once the water is boiling, pour in the rice, and mix in some salt and/or butter/margarine/oil if you wish. Let the water return to a boil while stirring. Then turn the heat down, cover, and allow the rice to simmer until it is light and fluffy. This should take about 20-40 minutes, giving you enough time to take care of the rest of the dish.

    The Black Beans: Chop up the onion and put it in a skillet. Then mix in the diced tomatoes (do not drain the juice out) and garlic and begin to saute the mix. Once the onions seem tender enough and the mix has boiled some, add in the black beans (drain the juice). Stir and cook for a few minutes. Then turn the heat down to simmering and allow for the mix to simmer for about 15-20 minutes.

    After both the rice and the beans have finished cooking, just dish yourself some of the rice and pour some of the bean mix on top of it.

    If you can get some, fresh cuban bread goes really well with this.

    Price wise, this shouldn't cost any more than $10, and probably even shouldn't get that high.

    DarkDragoon on
  • theparttimetheparttime Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    food staples will save your life in college and will save a lot of money. Rice, potatoes, and pasta or noodles. Just put some effort behind frying up some veggies or meat when you have some cash and you should have a delicious meal. I'd say pasta or something with rice are easy goodies.

    theparttime on
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    food staples will save your life in college and will save a lot of money. Rice, potatoes, and pasta or noodles. Just put some effort behind frying up some veggies or meat when you have some cash and you should have a delicious meal. I'd say pasta or something with rice are easy goodies.

    Incidentally, I think this is where the "freshman 15" comes from. Lots-o-carbs.

    AbsoluteZero on
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  • DarkDragoonDarkDragoon Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I've also found that buying a loaf of bread, some cheese, and deli-meats (especially the pre-packaged variety packs) allow for a retardedly cheap week of lunches, and they're actually pretty taste and can also be healthy depending on what you put in/on them. Lettuce goes incredibly well with most deli meats and really add a nice, healthy crunch to the sandwich.

    DarkDragoon on
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I'd say various egg recipes might be a good idea, seeing as how cheap you can get them by them by the dozen. I've become kind of partial to boiling a bunch of eggs and refrigerating them in a ziplock bag. Then, whenever it's lunch time, I just take one out, crumble it up between two slices of bread, put some may on, and sprinkle some cheese over it. Bam, instant egg sandwich, and it shouldn't cost any more than $5-6 to make a weeks worth of the stuff.

    Speaking of hard boiled eggs, this is the bestest way to make them:

    1. Lay the eggs in the pan and add enough cold water to submerge them by at least 1 inch. Set over high heat and bring just to a boil; remove from heat, cover the pan, and let sit exactly 17 minutes.

    2. When the time is up, transfer the eggs to a bowl of ice cubes and water (again, enough water to submerge the eggs). Chill for 2 minutes while bringing the cooking water to a boil again. (This 2 minute chilling shrinks the body of the egg from the shell.)

    3. Transfer the eggs (6 at a time only) to the boiling water, bring to a boil again, and let boil for 10 seconds - this expands the shell from the egg. Remove eggs, and place back into the ice water.


    Chilling the eggs promptly after each step prevents that dark line from forming, and if time allows, leave the eggs in the ice water after the last step for 15 to 20 minutes. Chilled eggs are easier to peel, as well.

    If you wish you can peel the eggs and submerge them in cold water, they will keep perfectly fresh this way for 3 days in a refrigerator. That way you don't have to peel the bastards every time you want to eat one, but they won't keep as long as they would if they still had shells.

    AbsoluteZero on
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  • durandal4532durandal4532 Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Almost any meat, sauteed for a few minutes in some olive oil and hella spices, then put in the oven in whatever sauce you like or simply more olive oil(I like olive oil) tastes incredibly delicious.

    The great part is that you get to mix and match with the spices. I prefer to butterfly-cut chicken, roll it around in some garlic/cumin/oregano, then add some salt and maybe some curry/turmeric powder, as well as a shot of spice blend stuff. Because I love spices.

    You can easily make the sauce you cook it in something tomato-based for pasta/chicken, or maybe something heavier if you're having potato/chicken or whatnot.

    I apologize for the lack of specifics, but the point is: Buy like $6 worth of chicken and experiment once or twice a week, and you will find a good mix. Also don't sautee it too long, but do it on a high heat. Make sure the pan is hot before you put it on. Cook in the oven maybe 8-10 minutes, and poke it to make sure it's cooked.

    durandal4532 on
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  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2008
    My dad's college had rancid food and hot-plate cooking was widespread, so I'll see if he has any.

    Scalfin on
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  • Richard_DastardlyRichard_Dastardly Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    This'll make pretty authentic tasting ramen noodles on the cheap. I'm not sure what the miso and tahini would cost in another city, but it's pretty cheap where I'm at. And they both last forever.

    1 packet of cheap ramen noodles
    1 tablespoon of Bean Paste (Miso)
    1 tablespoon of Sesame Seed Paste (Tahini)
    1/2 packet of seasoning from the ramen noodles
    1 egg (optional)

    Boil the ramen. Once the water is boiling, mix a ladelfull of it with the bean paste, sesame seed paste and seasoning. Once the ramen is done, scoop it out with a fork or whatever into the bowl. Scoop in the hot water as desired. If you want to add the egg for extra deliciousness, drop it in about 30 seconds before you remove the ramen... and be careful not to break the yolk.

    Richard_Dastardly on
  • JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Medopine wrote: »
    If you crack an egg into your boiling water right before you put ramen noodles in, it is tasty

    Is it in any way similar to egg drop soup?

    JebusUD on
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  • EndEnd Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    The cheap stuff is your rice, beans, noodles, etc. Most meat is fairly expensive, if you're really trying to not spend too much. (Edit: I guess theparttime already covered these...hehe)

    For a few weeks early this summer, I mostly lived on stir fried vegatables on rice. I guess there was a lack of protein, but now I can afford some chicken to put on top. :P

    End on
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  • amateurhouramateurhour One day I'll be professionalhour The woods somewhere in TennesseeRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Also, regarding the sandwich route.

    don't just go out and buy the .78 cent head of iceburg lettuce. You might as well just eat the plastic wrapped around it instead. It will help clear out your system, but that's about it.

    For about $3 to $4 you can go to publix or kroger or walmart or wherever and get a plastic container about seven inches wide by ten long by three deep (I can't remember the brand name, so I gave dimensions) of mixed greens that are healthy, last the whole week, and perfect for salads, sandwich toppers, soups, or anything else.

    amateurhour on
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  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2008
    JebusUD wrote: »
    Medopine wrote: »
    If you crack an egg into your boiling water right before you put ramen noodles in, it is tasty

    Is it in any way similar to egg drop soup?

    Somewhat, but egg drop is technically chicken soup, as you use broth.


    I've always thought that using egg drops in chicken knaidel soup would taste good

    Scalfin on
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  • AroducAroduc regular
    edited September 2008
    Your basic carbonara is egg, milk and pasta. Usually you toss in some ham and/or bacon too, but it's a pretty delicious pasta recipe that I really like.

    Aroduc on
  • BallmanBallman Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    I'd say that tips & techniques, rather than just specific recipes, would also be very helpful for students in dorms. For instance, even spaghetti calls for boiling water, which you can't always make in dorms. We weren't even allowed to have hot plates when I lived in the dorm.

    For instance, a rice cooker is cheap (like $15), quick, and retard-proof. You could eat a bunch of white rice, or you could substitute a whole grain instead for only a little more money to get a lot more fiber. My recommendations are quinoa, couscous, bulgar wheat, or brown rice (in that order, for my tastes). And if those are too bland, you can just throw some basic seasonings in, or get creative. Boullion cubes work really well, but you could also use chili powder, lemon pepper, salsa, or pretty much anything else that will add flavor.

    Also, foreman grills are great for cooking any kind of meat. It'll work for just about any kind of meat you can think of, as well as some vegetables or breads. You could use them to make funny-looking quesadillas or grilled-cheese sandwiches as well.

    It just occurred to me that I'd love to write a column focused on giving cooking/eating tips to college students. I'd think it would be a lot of fun.

    Ballman on
  • MahnmutMahnmut Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    • Lentils
    • Cumin
    • Brown Rice
    • Onions
    • Carrots
    • Hot Peppers

    Mahnmut on
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  • KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Aroduc wrote: »
    Your basic carbonara is egg, milk and pasta. Usually you toss in some ham and/or bacon too, but it's a pretty delicious pasta recipe that I really like.

    Cheese, man, cheese!

    KalTorak on
  • Golden LegGolden Leg Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    If there is a body of cleanish water near you, supplement pounds of beans, rice, and sweet potatoes with fish.

    What you can do with a fish is put it on a grill, or in an oven. Rabbits and squirrels are pretty good, as well, though eyebrows will most likely be raised at you when you are seen with a bow stalking a small animal.

    I guess what I'm saying is taking up some form of animal huntery will save you money that would have otherwise gone toward store-bought meat, and you get the satisfaction of killing your dinner.

    Golden Leg on
  • AbsoluteZeroAbsoluteZero The new film by Quentin Koopantino Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    If you are allowed to have one in your dorm, or wherever, a foreman grill is a good investment.

    AbsoluteZero on
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  • flamebroiledchickenflamebroiledchicken Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Burritos are really cheap and easy to make.

    Just get a pack of tortillas
    Some sour cream
    Some salsa
    Some shredded cheese
    Some hot sauce
    A box of rice and beans (Goya, or Rice a Roni, or whatever you want)

    Cook the rice and beans per the instructions on the box
    Slap it all into the middle of the tortilla and wrap it up

    This costs like 15 bucks and I had burritos for dinner 3 nights in a row.

    flamebroiledchicken on
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  • skyybahamutskyybahamut Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Golden Leg wrote: »
    If there is a body of cleanish water near you, supplement pounds of beans, rice, and sweet potatoes with fish.

    What you can do with a fish is put it on a grill, or in an oven. Rabbits and squirrels are pretty good, as well, though eyebrows will most likely be raised at you when you are seen with a bow stalking a small animal.

    I guess what I'm saying is taking up some form of animal huntery will save you money that would have otherwise gone toward store-bought meat, and you get the satisfaction of killing your dinner.

    My freshman roomate hunted for phesants. He acctually gutted and cleaned them in our floor's public kitchen. He was not popular with a few others for that reason, but a call home from me and a recipe for wild game stuffing (hint wild rice and cranberries=awsome) and the floor loved our prei-thanksgiving feast.

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  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-make-glazed-carrots

    Carrots -- even the organic variety -- can be less than $1 per pound. Filling, healthy, nutritious.

    I also have a recipe for pho flavored pot roast that's full of flavor and fairly inexpensive ($2 per pound for the meat, plus maybe $10 for the staples and $4 for the produce), but that might be a bit complicated for your audience.

    Schrodinger on
  • themightypuckthemightypuck MontanaRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Rice cooker. Canned tuna and salmon. Soy sauce. Cook rice. Heat a pan and throw some oil in it. Toss in protein and rice and stir around add soy sauce for flavor. That's the bare bones version of course. You can steam vegetables etc. as well.

    themightypuck on
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  • adamadam Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    There is a book called like a can and a man my friends had. Reall simple and lots of diversity too.

    adam on
  • themightypuckthemightypuck MontanaRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    http://www.amazon.com/Man-Can-Plan-Great-Meals/dp/1579546072

    The above mentioned book. I googled but have not read.

    themightypuck on
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  • Xenogears of BoreXenogears of Bore Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Because Americans eat so much damn chicken breast and so little of the other parts (wings excluded) you can find Leg Quarters or their individual components on sale most weeks at grocery stores. Given two or three in most major college towns you should be able to get them at well below $1 a pound.

    The amount of stuff you can do with leg quarters is terrifying. Stock for soup, BBQ'd, chicken tacos in a quick homemade mole, or hell just roasted on a bed of root veggies. Thighs make great stirfry, drumsticks are great even if home bbq'd (in a low slow oven with a good rub)

    I would suggest whole chickens broken up when on sale but having access to a good set of knives at school is doubtful.

    Other good cheap cuts of meat to look out for are the pork chops of the non center cut variety. They usually hover between .99-1.39 a pound and are very flavorful. I like to coat them in a little bit of flour and spices and slowly pan fry them.

    Ground dark turkey meat is usually cheaper than breast meat and makes absolutely killer meatloaf. A great college style recipe of mine uses pulverized garlic and butter croutons as the bread substitute, easily done with a chem book and a plastic bag. Throw in some parsley (dried or fresh) some salt, some pepper, an egg, a bit of ketchup (one quick squirt) and half a medium onion chop finely. Shape them small and bake in a 400 degree oven in a pan coated with some olive oil. Move them around in 15 minutes and then cook for another ten, serve with your favorite sauce.

    Those burritoes listed a few posts above mine got me through an entire semester. That flamebroiledchicken guy knows a good filler burrito when he sees one. Only thing I'd add is some guacamole.

    2 avacado's that give under pressure

    1 1/2 limes

    1 tomato, diced

    2 garlic cloves, diced

    Salt, pepper to taste.

    That + basically the same burrito recipe got me through college. Heck I had it for dinner last night, and will have it for lunch tomorrow. Keeps fantastically.

    Avacados are on sale at Super Wal-Marts like every other week.

    Xenogears of Bore on
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  • KalTorakKalTorak One way or another, they all end up in the Undercity.Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Cans of refried beans are cheap as dirt, generally fat free, and filling.

    KalTorak on
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited September 2008
    Because Americans eat so much damn chicken breast and so little of the other parts (wings excluded) you can find Leg Quarters or their individual components on sale most weeks at grocery stores. Given two or three in most major college towns you should be able to get them at well below $1 a pound.

    The amount of stuff you can do with leg quarters is terrifying. Stock for soup, BBQ'd, chicken tacos in a quick homemade mole, or hell just roasted on a bed of root veggies. Thighs make great stirfry, drumsticks are great even if home bbq'd (in a low slow oven with a good rub)

    I would suggest whole chickens broken up when on sale but having access to a good set of knives at school is doubtful.

    Other good cheap cuts of meat to look out for are the pork chops of the non center cut variety. They usually hover between .99-1.39 a pound and are very flavorful. I like to coat them in a little bit of flour and spices and slowly pan fry them.

    Ground dark turkey meat is usually cheaper than breast meat and makes absolutely killer meatloaf. A great college style recipe of mine uses pulverized garlic and butter croutons as the bread substitute, easily done with a chem book and a plastic bag. Throw in some parsley (dried or fresh) some salt, some pepper, an egg, a bit of ketchup (one quick squirt) and half a medium onion chop finely. Shape them small and bake in a 400 degree oven in a pan coated with some olive oil. Move them around in 15 minutes and then cook for another ten, serve with your favorite sauce.

    Those burritoes listed a few posts above mine got me through an entire semester. That flamebroiledchicken guy knows a good filler burrito when he sees one. Only thing I'd add is some guacamole.

    2 avacado's that give under pressure

    1 1/2 limes

    1 tomato, diced

    2 garlic cloves, diced

    Salt, pepper to taste.

    That + basically the same burrito recipe got me through college. Heck I had it for dinner last night, and will have it for lunch tomorrow. Keeps fantastically.

    Avacados are on sale at Super Wal-Marts like every other week.

    Does anybody sell the pupic?

    Scalfin on
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  • CodeCode Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    also, on the note of rice cookers. A rice cooker can be used to make a LOT more than just rice, especially if you spend a little more at the start for a nicer one, I have made the best pork roast ever with mine. Get a small roast, a packet of french onion soup mix, some garlic, and maybe some red wine (hobo wine works fine) throw the roast in the rice cooker, add the soup mix, some water, red wine, and the garlic, set on slow cook for about 4 hours, and go to class. when you come back, you will smell delicious food, and the roast will be so tender you can cut it with a fork, now you have dinner, and sandwiches for about a week. see also, steamed veggies in the rice cooker, real oatmeal, and other slow cooked grain dishes.

    Code on
  • CokebotleCokebotle 穴掘りの 電車内Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    A fallback I use even now is I start boiling pasta, and when it's almost done I toss in some frozen veggies until the pasta is cooked (and the veggies are now boiled and hot, so about 3-4 mins or so). Drain and toss in a can of tuna. Season as you wish (cheese, oregano, garlic, etc).

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  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    Some general thoughts:

    1) Go to the store and figure out what's cheap and healthy. Work from there. Then figure out recipes that you can build around them. This will vary based on season and based on geography.

    2) Contrary to popular belief, but most people are already getting 2-3 times more protein than they need. You don't need to eat half a pound of meat per meal. Our bodies weren't designed for that. For the vast majority of human evolution, meat was treated as a special occasion. And if you're a college kid who doesn't know how to cook, it's best to avoid the safety issues. I also think that using meat can be a crutch, and that relying more on vegetables forces you to pay more attention to the flavorings.

    3) If you do buy meat, then braising is your friend. Look for cheap cuts that can be slow cooked. But a slow cooker, or better yet, a dutch oven. It's fairly low maintenance with a huge margin of error.

    4) I like Mark Bittman's thoughts on pasta sauce. If you're using a vegetable based sauce, then don't be afraid to overload on the sauce and skimp on the pasta.

    5) Herbs and spices are good. I like Trader Joe's. They stock up on basil, cilantro, and garlic in the form is frozen cubes. Which is probably the closest you'll get to fresh without actually using fresh.

    6) The Food Network is overrated. Really. Alton Brown is good, however.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mvc8Au4YO60

    Schrodinger on
  • themightypuckthemightypuck MontanaRegistered User regular
    edited September 2008
    2) Contrary to popular belief, but most people are already getting 2-3 times more protein than they need. You don't need to eat half a pound of meat per meal. Our bodies weren't designed for that. For the vast majority of human evolution, meat was treated as a special occasion.

    I don't buy this. I admit I don't know, but it seems more plausible to me that pre-agricultural societies ate a lot of meat. Consider the Inuit.

    themightypuck on
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  • SchrodingerSchrodinger Registered User regular
    edited September 2008
    2) Contrary to popular belief, but most people are already getting 2-3 times more protein than they need. You don't need to eat half a pound of meat per meal. Our bodies weren't designed for that. For the vast majority of human evolution, meat was treated as a special occasion.

    I don't buy this. I admit I don't know, but it seems more plausible to me that pre-agricultural societies ate a lot of meat. Consider the Inuit.

    You realized that most of our livestock is farmed as well, right? It's not like people didn't know how to grow plants, so they drove to the nearest Sam's Club to buy 50 pounds of ground beef. Also, the types of meat and the cuts of meat that the Inuit eat are very different from what the average college student will have access to. For instance, apparently they get their Vitamin C from eating Whale Skin. Know any college students who eat whale skin? It's sort of like the studies saying that pizza prevents cancer, citing cancer rates in Italy. Of course, what the study ignores is that the type of pizza they eat in Italy is radically different from what you would find in the local pizza hut.

    Schrodinger on
  • OrganichuOrganichu poops peesRegistered User, Moderator mod
    edited September 2008
    IME most people don't eat nearly enough protein. They might have an absurdly large steak for dinner, but I know tons of young people who subsist on snack cakes, soda, things like that.

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