As was foretold, we've added advertisements to the forums! If you have questions, or if you encounter any bugs, please visit this thread: https://forums.penny-arcade.com/discussion/240191/forum-advertisement-faq-and-reports-thread/
Options

Stuck in the snow (not a girl thread)

Richard_DastardlyRichard_Dastardly Registered User regular
edited December 2008 in Help / Advice Forum
Well, it started hella early.

I have a '99 Cougar with rear wheel drive. I never had much problem getting around in the snow cuz the city keeps the major roads pretty well plowed. And then I bought a house. The side streets are not plowed and, being totally considerate, the people in my neighborhood shovel their snow into the streets. I've gotten stuck several times, but managed to wiggle my way out except for the one time I labored for an hour before the garbagemen came and helped push.

Chains aren't an option. So, any other ideas on how to cope with snowy and icy side streets with a rear wheel drive car? I generally get stuck in the same place, being right when I'm about to turn onto the major road (the snow being the highest thanks to cars, people shoveling, and those trucks with the giant shovels in front.)

Edit: I realize having a rear wheel drive car was a retarded purchase for a dude who lives in a place that gets a lot of snow, but I got the car for a really, really, really good price. Couldn't say no.

Richard_Dastardly on

Posts

  • Options
    Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Major East CoastRegistered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Momentum. Sand. Rock salt. All things you should keep with you at all times when driving in the deep snow.

    The second 2 in case you run out of the first one.

    Other than that I'm not sure what to tell you. Maybe keep some chains in the trunk in case you DO get stuck so someone can pull you out? (If you have mounts for it on the frame, I know my car does).

    Iceman.USAF on
  • Options
    Dunadan019Dunadan019 Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    you can probably just use some 2x8s wedged underneath the rear tires.

    then once you get going dont stop.

    you can also use sand to give your tires traction but its a little messier and not so reusable.

    Dunadan019 on
  • Options
    CrashtardCrashtard Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Like Iceman said, momentum is basically the key. Is it a corner where you can see both directions from a little further back? If so, stay 15-20 feet back from the snow and when you can go just juice it through. This is usally what I do and have been successful.

    Crashtard on
    I pinky swear that we will not screw you.

    Crashtard.jpg
  • Options
    Richard_DastardlyRichard_Dastardly Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Yeah, momentum keeps me going. But, where I generally get stuck has a stop sign and it's on an intersection with a busy road. So, I can't be all like, "Watch out bitches. I ain't stopin!"

    That, and the fact that no one stops to help leaves me basically with rocks and salt, right? I'll have to pick some up today. I have a couple of bags of kitty litter in the trunk for weight. Ripped one open and used that when I was stuck, but it didn't help.

    Richard_Dastardly on
  • Options
    ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    More weight over the axels.

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • Options
    Richard_DastardlyRichard_Dastardly Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    More weight over the axels.

    So, I should put the weight over the axels instead of piled in the middle of the trunk?

    Is 80lbs ok, or should I go for double that?

    Richard_Dastardly on
  • Options
    bowenbowen How you doin'? Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    All I can tell you is yes, keep momentum. I can say, without any certainty, that police generally look the other way during the winter months of a stop sign as long as you make sure no one is coming. Although illegal, it's more of a pain in the ass for cops if someone's blocking a stop sign for 45 minutes until a plow/tow gets there.

    bowen on
    not a doctor, not a lawyer, examples I use may not be fully researched so don't take out of context plz, don't @ me
  • Options
    YourFatAuntSusanYourFatAuntSusan Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Are you able to put studs in your tires?

    YourFatAuntSusan on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • Options
    EverywhereasignEverywhereasign Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    My friend with a RWD throws at least an extra 150lbs of weight in the trunk in the winter.

    Learning to rock your way out is a great skill, once you get the hang of the motion you'll rarely ever get stuck.
    Go forward until your wheels are just about to lose traction and roll back, then rock forward again. Each time you're moving a tiny bit of snow and building momentum at the same time.

    Don't just floor your way out, it might work a couple times, but each time it'll be more difficult and you'll be buying new tires every year.

    All that being said, if your car is too low and getting hung up on the snow, all the traction in the world isn't going to give you more ground clearance.

    Everywhereasign on
    "What are you dense? Are you retarded or something? Who the hell do you think I am? I'm the goddamn Batman!"
  • Options
    RUNN1NGMANRUNN1NGMAN Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Do you have honest-to-goodness winter tires on your car? If you live in a wintery region they are well worth the investment. "All-weather" tires aren't going to cut it in serious snow and ice.

    RUNN1NGMAN on
  • Options
    MagicPrimeMagicPrime FiresideWizard Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    I drive a '95 Camaro and have to deal with this a lot. I have three big bags of cat litter in my trunk that seems to help a lot, and I can usually reverse gear out of a spot when I get stuck. The hard part is getting going forward - just go really light on the gas if you are at a dead spot and as your momentum increases put more pressure on the pedal. Be careful, rear wheel vehicles can whip around on you in a hot second.

    MagicPrime on
    BNet • magicprime#1430 | PSN/Steam • MagicPrime | Origin • FireSideWizard
    Critical Failures - Havenhold CampaignAugust St. Cloud (Human Ranger)
  • Options
    DmanDman Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    I keep a shovel in my trunk, I have unstuck a few people (including myself) by shoveling clear under/in-front of their car and wheels.

    If rocking fails, shoveling and a good push is my go-to method.

    And the momentum thing is totally true (rolling stop ftw), but it can only get you through so much snow.

    Dman on
  • Options
    Richard_DastardlyRichard_Dastardly Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    I'll have to check on whether or not I can have tire studs... might be worth the investment.
    RUNN1NGMAN wrote: »
    Do you have honest-to-goodness winter tires on your car? If you live in a wintery region they are well worth the investment. "All-weather" tires aren't going to cut it in serious snow and ice.

    I'll have to ask my dad. I'm willfully ignorant about cars, so I'll have to ask my dad. I bought the car from him.
    MagicPrime wrote: »
    I drive a '95 Camaro and have to deal with this a lot. I have three big bags of cat litter in my trunk that seems to help a lot, and I can usually reverse gear out of a spot when I get stuck. The hard part is getting going forward - just go really light on the gas if you are at a dead spot and as your momentum increases put more pressure on the pedal. Be careful, rear wheel vehicles can whip around on you in a hot second.

    I have a really hard time with pushing the gas pedal lightly enough. Even in the summer I'm squeeling my tires.

    I'm a... I'm a terrible driver.

    Richard_Dastardly on
  • Options
    oncelingonceling Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    RUNN1NGMAN wrote: »
    Do you have honest-to-goodness winter tires on your car? If you live in a wintery region they are well worth the investment. "All-weather" tires aren't going to cut it in serious snow and ice.

    I'll have to ask my dad. I'm willfully ignorant about cars, so I'll have to ask my dad. I bought the car from him.

    Really sounds like you should probably just go with decent snow tires for the winter. It's EXTREMELY unlikely that your dad left snow tires on the car (esp if you have been driving it in the non-winter months). You basically just need to get 2 sets, one for winter and one for the rest of the year.

    onceling on
  • Options
    vonPoonBurGervonPoonBurGer Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    I'll have to check on whether or not I can have tire studs... might be worth the investment.
    RUNN1NGMAN wrote: »
    Do you have honest-to-goodness winter tires on your car? If you live in a wintery region they are well worth the investment. "All-weather" tires aren't going to cut it in serious snow and ice.

    I'll have to ask my dad. I'm willfully ignorant about cars, so I'll have to ask my dad. I bought the car from him.
    You probably have all-season tires on that car right now. When it comes to places that get serious snowfall in winter, the term "all-season" is a dirty, dirty lie. I live in Montreal, and I went all last winter without snow tires because I am a) crazy, b) stupid and c) the king of procrastination, I kid you not. This winter is the first that snow tires are mandatory in Montreal, so that provided the necessary motivation for me to get it done this year. Having proper winter tires really makes a world of difference.

    vonPoonBurGer on
    Xbox Live:vonPoon | PSN: vonPoon | Steam: vonPoonBurGer
  • Options
    wallabeeXwallabeeX Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Just to recap, coming from a guy from Maine:

    Really good snow tires
    Keep a bucket of sand in your trunk over your axels
    Keep some boards in your trunk
    Learn how to rock out of being stuck
    Learn how to kindly ask people for help
    For this purpose, keep a chain in your trunk for people who have trucks but no chain

    wallabeeX on
  • Options
    ImprovoloneImprovolone Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Double advantage to sand or kitty litter being used as weight is that it can be spread on the snow to give you more traction.

    Improvolone on
    Voice actor for hire. My time is free if your project is!
  • Options
    ImDrawingABlankImDrawingABlank Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Seconding everything that has been said here, I drive a RWD truck, I use 300lbs of sand over the rear axle. Cost me $30 or so for 60lb bags of play sand. I would like to suggest buying a proper tow strap though, chains aren't bad as typically there isn't alot of force involved in getting someone unstuck in the winter, but if the person pulling you doesnt handle it right, or you are stuck in a spot where there is lots of drag holding you in place a chain can snap, its only as strong as its weakest link. When a chain snaps it has a strong habit of going for windows or faces, I've seen it happen first hand offroading. Don't take the chance if you can afford the few extra $$. Like I said, chances are low but its entirely possible if the person pulling you tries to pull with too much speed and jerks the chain, etc.

    ImDrawingABlank on
    lastfmml0.jpg
  • Options
    JediNightJediNight Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    I want to chime in for an affirmative on the snow tires. They are WELL worth it if you live in an area that gets snow regularly. All-Season tires are merely barely adequate for driving in the snow.

    Let me tell you, the difference is like night and day when I put on my Blizzak's for the winter. Even in Wisconsin, like 95% of the assholes out there don't have snow tires, and instead drive 15mph even when the lanes are clear. They basically allow you to drive almost normal road speeds unless it's a very curvy road or very deep snow.

    What snow tires WILL do: They work wonders on preventing fish-tailing while driving straight down a road. They also generally prevent out of control sliding. Increased braking potential over All-season while in the snow.

    What snow tires WILL NOT do: They are not superglue! If you slam on your brakes you will still slide. Traction is reduced while turning, so you may still slip a little at that point, but you won't get stuck and you usually catch fairly quickly if you do slide. I recommend the Blizzak snow tires.

    For those of you who don't: What's cheaper? $300 for a set of snow tires that last around 5-7years, or $5000 repair bill after you hit someone or slide into a retaining wall? Or lost time/money from tow trucks or just having to be stressed out with the snow. I actually enjoy it snowing now, because I don't have to worry almost at all.

    JediNight on
  • Options
    milehighmilehigh Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Another vote for studded snows. I have a 300zx with a fair amount of power (auto). With all seasons I'm helpless, get stuck in anything, and slide around on any amount of snow or ice. Studded snows catch ice and snow extremely well, I can make it through just about anything that doesn't high center the car. This is without any extra weight in the back.

    Note, these do not make you the God of snow (get a Subaru/Audi and throw studs on it, THEN you can claim yourself a deity =D). It's still necessary to take caution on turns and keep your distance in bad weather anytime.

    milehigh on
  • Options
    TopiaTopia Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    the people in my neighborhood shovel their snow into the streets.

    Report this, a lot of cities have by-laws against this because, well, it causes shit like getting people stuck.

    Topia on
  • Options
    CorvusCorvus . VancouverRegistered User regular
    edited December 2008
    I'll have to check on whether or not I can have tire studs... might be worth the investment.
    RUNN1NGMAN wrote: »
    Do you have honest-to-goodness winter tires on your car? If you live in a wintery region they are well worth the investment. "All-weather" tires aren't going to cut it in serious snow and ice.

    I'll have to ask my dad. I'm willfully ignorant about cars, so I'll have to ask my dad. I bought the car from him.
    You probably have all-season tires on that car right now. When it comes to places that get serious snowfall in winter, the term "all-season" is a dirty, dirty lie. I live in Montreal, and I went all last winter without snow tires because I am a) crazy, b) stupid and c) the king of procrastination, I kid you not. This winter is the first that snow tires are mandatory in Montreal, so that provided the necessary motivation for me to get it done this year. Having proper winter tires really makes a world of difference.

    It really does help. Unfortunately, in the rest of Canada, there's a shortage of winter tires because of Quebec's new law.

    I watched a nice comparison show on CBC last winter with two qualified test drivers (a champion rally driver and a Transport Canada tester) doing side by side moves in Minivans with All Seasons and Winter tires on, and even with pros doing it, they crashed on a number of emergency situations with all seasons.

    Thread has helped me with the where to put weight question. I've been putting weight in my van for a while, but I was never sure if I had it in the right place.

    Corvus on
    :so_raven:
  • Options
    mtsmts Dr. Robot King Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    defintiely go 100-150 lbs.

    carpet remnants also work well for traction

    mts on
    camo_sig.png
  • Options
    stigweardstigweard Registered User regular
    edited December 2008
    Most places won't let you stud tires that have been on the road, and you cannot stud all season tires. I looked into it quickly and you most likely either have 205/60r15s (4cyl engine base tires) or 215/50r16s (base option for the 6 cyl model). A 50 series winter tire would be terribly expensive, so a better option would be to buy 15" winter wheels (decent steel, not universal as they balance at the bolt and not the hub), and go with a narrower / higher profile. If you go to a 195/65r15, you have the same diameter tire but narrower, and better for deep snow. A decent set of winter wheels, and a full set of studded winter tires is going to run about 800$, but the investment is well worth it. Depending on your driving style, you will get 3 - 4 winter seasons out of them before needing new rubber.

    There is another thread around here somewhere on winter driving that has mostly good advice and is worth a read. Apart from that, you should be sure to get a 4 wheel alignment done every winter before you put on studs. You will throw the studs if your tires are out of balance or it your alignment is out more than 1 degree. Also, always use the same tires front and back, and stud all of them, not two. Rotate them at oil changes - the car is up in the air anyway, and it hardly costs anything.

    stigweard on
Sign In or Register to comment.