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Blocking WoW

CirrusCirrus Registered User regular
edited November 2006 in Help / Advice Forum
So, my brother's WoW addiction has spiraled violently out of control, and it has to be stopped.

With that in mind, I've decided to block the port from the router. I have a Linksys WRT54G v2.2, with the most recent firmware upgrade.

So, the simple question is how do I block JUST WoW? I've gone into the Access Restrictions tab, set it to allow internet traffic, and then made a thing to block just the port WoW runs on - but every time I do that, it blocks all internet traffic completely.

Any clues?

Cirrus on
«13

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    RaneadosRaneados police apologist you shouldn't have been there, obviouslyRegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    1) how's he paying for it?

    if a) his mom or you, talk to said person and get them to stop paying for it

    b) himself, then leave him alone, jesus christ

    Raneados on
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    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    I'd have to look into exactly which ports it uses, but that info should be on their forums under firewall help.

    But, an effective way is to go into applications and gamaing and just forward that port (or range) to a non existant ip address on your network.

    So if you linksys hands out say, 192.168.1.2 - 192.168.1.100, forward it to 192.168.1.200 or some such.

    EclecticGroove on
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    bsjezzbsjezz Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Don't do this, if you care at all for your relationship with your brother. If his addiction is out of control, then, firstly, the problem is greater than a damn router port, and secondly, cutting him off will likely result in violence (or at least a lot of bitterness between you). Talk to him, if you haven't already, and try to get him to realise he's spending too much time. Sure, it's about a thousand times harder, but it has to be done if you want to have a lasting impact on his behaviours.

    If you must cut it off, tell him you're going to do it, give him ample warning, and tell him you're willing to talk about it and compromise. If he's got stuff planned in-game and you shaft not only him but his buddies too, you're the one who's going to come off as unreasonable.

    bsjezz on
    sC4Q4nq.jpg
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    WezoinWezoin Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Raneados wrote:
    b) himself, then leave him alone, jesus christ

    I agree, not sure if this is what you were getting at, but if he is paying for it, it means he must have a job, which means he must spend at least a fair ammount of time away from wow

    Wezoin on
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    robaalrobaal Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Heh, I think Outpost Firewall Pro (not free) that I used could do that (it's software, so it'd just block the app). And I think you can password-protect it. And it can protect itself against attempts to terminate it (and by that I mean that it basically hangs the system).

    robaal on
    "Love is a snowmobile racing across the tundra when suddenly it flips over, pinning you underneath.
    At night, the ice weasels come."

  • Options
    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Wezoin wrote:
    Raneados wrote:
    b) himself, then leave him alone, jesus christ

    I agree, not sure if this is what you were getting at, but if he is paying for it, it means he must have a job, which means he must spend at least a fair ammount of time away from wow

    Not always true.

    I used to hang with a guy that was so addicted to EQ that he played it for hours and hours every single night, getting little sleep. Often skipped work to play it, played it AT work when there. When he wasn't directly logged into the game, he was logged into web sites about it and using a program that logged you in for chatting purposes.

    Eventually he left his wife for some girl he met in the game, and I haven't heard from this guy in over 2 years now.

    So just because you have a job =! spending time away from a game like this.

    If his brother is this bad, or worse, then cutting the cord isn't a bad thing.. concider it an intervention.

    EclecticGroove on
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    Dread Pirate ArbuthnotDread Pirate Arbuthnot OMG WRIGGLY T O X O P L A S M O S I SRegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    How addicted is addicted? I don't mean that this isn't a problem, but I was "addicted" to WoW for a few months, and then got a wake-up call from real life, a boyfriend, a social life, and started to play in moderation. Unless if this guy is having things fall apart in real life badly, I don't see how this is necessary.

    Dread Pirate Arbuthnot on
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    RaneadosRaneados police apologist you shouldn't have been there, obviouslyRegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    you're not going to help anything by just cutting the source, they'll find a new source or react with violence or bitterness


    talk to your brother. How old is he?

    Raneados on
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    CirrusCirrus Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Wezoin wrote:
    Raneados wrote:
    b) himself, then leave him alone, jesus christ

    I agree, not sure if this is what you were getting at, but if he is paying for it, it means he must have a job, which means he must spend at least a fair ammount of time away from wow

    Not always true.

    I used to hang with a guy that was so addicted to EQ that he played it for hours and hours every single night, getting little sleep. Often skipped work to play it, played it AT work when there. When he wasn't directly logged into the game, he was logged into web sites about it and using a program that logged you in for chatting purposes.

    Eventually he left his wife for some girl he met in the game, and I haven't heard from this guy in over 2 years now.

    So just because you have a job =! spending time away from a game like this.

    If his brother is this bad, or worse, then cutting the cord isn't a bad thing.. concider it an intervention.

    We're basically verging on this, here.

    And yes, I consider it an intervention. I've talked to him, EVERYONE has talked to him, to no avail. And my mom WAS paying for it, until he got banned for something or other, at which point he went and bought another copy and bought prepaid cards. He's been like this for months, and it's not getting any better. We're also relatively sure he's got mild aspergers, so he's essentially the most stubborn person in thh world, and anything you tell him that doesn't fit with his worldview is outright rejected. (He's always been this way. He used to argue with us when we were teaching him his alphabet. "This is a B." "No it's not!" "...yes." "NO!!")

    So yes, the only thing we can do is just cut him off. He used to go outside, have friends, and do things - but ever since he's been playing WoW, it's all he does. So yes, I'm cutting him off. I simply need to know how.

    Also, the ports don't need forwarded in WoW, so that doesn't work, as I can't set it to forward to a nonexistant IP, since it works even without telling it to forward to anything at all...

    Any more ideas, guys? I need to figure this out before I go back to college in a few days...

    Edit: Also, he does NOT have a job. He's getting the money from my grandparents and aunt, who are well-intentioned but...well, you know how people can be. So yes, my parents have no way to stop his cashflow, and are...well, awful parents, and so they won't deal with the tantrum that would ensue if they simply took away internet access - though they agree that he needs to stop.

    So yes...help?

    Cirrus on
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    Dread Pirate ArbuthnotDread Pirate Arbuthnot OMG WRIGGLY T O X O P L A S M O S I SRegistered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Cirrus wrote:
    Wezoin wrote:
    Raneados wrote:
    b) himself, then leave him alone, jesus christ

    I agree, not sure if this is what you were getting at, but if he is paying for it, it means he must have a job, which means he must spend at least a fair ammount of time away from wow

    Not always true.

    I used to hang with a guy that was so addicted to EQ that he played it for hours and hours every single night, getting little sleep. Often skipped work to play it, played it AT work when there. When he wasn't directly logged into the game, he was logged into web sites about it and using a program that logged you in for chatting purposes.

    Eventually he left his wife for some girl he met in the game, and I haven't heard from this guy in over 2 years now.

    So just because you have a job =! spending time away from a game like this.

    If his brother is this bad, or worse, then cutting the cord isn't a bad thing.. concider it an intervention.

    We're basically verging on this, here.

    And yes, I consider it an intervention. I've talked to him, EVERYONE has talked to him, to no avail. And my mom WAS paying for it, until he got banned for something or other, at which point he went and bought another copy and bought prepaid cards. He's been like this for months, and it's not getting any better. We're also relatively sure he's got mild aspergers, so he's essentially the most stubborn person in thh world, and anything you tell him that doesn't fit with his worldview is outright rejected. (He's always been this way. He used to argue with us when we were teaching him his alphabet. "This is a B." "No it's not!" "...yes." "NO!!")

    So yes, the only thing we can do is just cut him off. He used to go outside, have friends, and do things - but ever since he's been playing WoW, it's all he does. So yes, I'm cutting him off. I simply need to know how.

    Also, the ports don't need forwarded in WoW, so that doesn't work, as I can't set it to forward to a nonexistant IP, since it works even without telling it to forward to anything at all...

    Any more ideas, guys? I need to figure this out before I go back to college in a few days...

    Edit: Also, he does NOT have a job. He's getting the money from my grandparents and aunt, who are well-intentioned but...well, you know how people can be. So yes, my parents have no way to stop his cashflow, and are...well, awful parents, and so they won't deal with the tantrum that would ensue if they simply took away internet access - though they agree that he needs to stop.

    So yes...help?

    Blizzard offers a Parental Controls option, however I'm pretty sure you will need his sign-up info to access the panel. Check on their site at worldofwarcraft.com

    Dread Pirate Arbuthnot on
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    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    wow does not need ports forwarded because it creates a nat table from an outgoing connection.. basically this means wow phones out, then information follows that connection back to your pc.

    When you create a route manually for those ports, it no longer looks at the nat table in the router, so when wow phones out, the information will try and go to the route you set, not follow it back the way it came out.

    EclecticGroove on
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    embrikembrik Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Looking at the documentation for the router, I'm not sure if there would be a way to do this without a firewall of some sort. You might be able to block it with the Windows Firewall, but I don't know if Windows would then prompt to unblock every time you tried to connect.

    I blocked this with my Linux Firewall a while ago for a delinquent roommate who was playing instead of working and paying the bills (I covered him, as all the bills were in my name), so it is possible, but I'm not sure how to easily do it with what you've got. Has anyone else here messed with the Windows Firewall?

    embrik on
    "Damn you and your Daily Doubles, you brigand!"

    I don't believe it - I'm on my THIRD PS3, and my FIRST XBOX360. What the heck?
  • Options
    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    under linksys routers, it's usually the tab called applications and gaming.

    EclecticGroove on
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    CirrusCirrus Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Yeah - I just tried forwarding it to a nonexistant IP, it seems to have done absolutely nothing. Still pops right onto WoW. So that's a bust...

    And yeah - I need something he wont' be able to easily change or look up how to change. I'm the only one who has even the vaguest notion how to change the settings on the router, so I was hoping I could do it from there...

    Cirrus on
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    noobertnoobert Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    How was his social life befor WoW? Did he go out often have quite a few friends etc?

    For lot's of people their virtual life is much more forfilling than their real life.

    noobert on
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    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Cirrus wrote:
    Yeah - I just tried forwarding it to a nonexistant IP, it seems to have done absolutely nothing. Still pops right onto WoW. So that's a bust...

    And yeah - I need something he wont' be able to easily change or look up how to change. I'm the only one who has even the vaguest notion how to change the settings on the router, so I was hoping I could do it from there...

    You can, but obviously there needs to be more ports blocked. Some applications are more robust than others so you would have to forward a number of ports.

    I'll look up the ports, but to make sure you are setting it up the screen is usually:

    a field for a name, just call it wow - start port - end port -protocol (choose both to be sure) - ip to forward to (just put 200 at the end) then a check box to enable settings.

    *edit:

    from blizzards support section:

    World of Warcraft uses the TCP protocol on port 3724.

    The Blizzard Downloader, which downloads patches, also uses TCP ports 6112 and the range 6881-6999.

    Based on that, create 2 entries, that will block the updater and the game itself if set up properly.

    EclecticGroove on
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    embrikembrik Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    OK, looking into it more, you may be able to change Group policy IPSec stuff. It's not for the novice, but here's where to start - IPSec Starting Snapin
    I won't get into how to configure a rule, etc, but you should be able to block outgoing traffic just fine with that. Read the help in the MMC and the related topic links on that page.

    Edit - If I'm reading it right... that should work. Can anyone confirm? I'm heading out the door.

    embrik on
    "Damn you and your Daily Doubles, you brigand!"

    I don't believe it - I'm on my THIRD PS3, and my FIRST XBOX360. What the heck?
  • Options
    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    only issue with using something on the pc itself is he has physical access to it.. it's MUCH easier to disable something you have your hands on, wheras the router can be kept someplace safer.

    Depending on the exact model and firmware revision on the router you have, there are probably other ways to block this. But port forwarding to a black hole is easy, effective, and works on any router I know of.

    EclecticGroove on
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    For the FutureFor the Future ClubPA regular
    edited November 2006
    Would be a shame if he got his account "hacked".

    Might even quit the game.

    For the Future on
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    bsjezzbsjezz Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    cirrus wrote:
    So yes, my parents have no way to stop his cashflow, and are...well, awful parents, and so they won't deal with the tantrum that would ensue if they simply took away internet access

    What makes you think that the tantrum is going to be any less severe if you take away WoW? I'm telling you, this is a bad idea. I agree that getting rid of his addiction is probably a good thing, but this is not the way to do it. If you're going back off to college, he'll figure out what you've done, fix it, and just hate you for it afterwards.

    Talk to your parents. Tell them to stand up and get serious about this. Turn off the internet if you must - your brother will still throw a paddy, but at least it shows him you guys care enough to make your own sacrifices, rather than just cutting him off in an underhand manner.

    bsjezz on
    sC4Q4nq.jpg
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    brett3k3brett3k3 Registered User new member
    edited November 2006
    What you could do is attempt to contact Blizz, or have your parents contact Blizz, and possibly request to be IP-banned. I'm sure it could be done, probably by your parents rather than you.

    brett3k3 on
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    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Fundamentally I'd agree that making your own sacrifice to help reign in the habit shows good faith. But he isn't talking about giving up a porn habit, drinking, smoking, playing videogames or anything.

    Cutting off the internet in many modern homes is like removing phone or postal service, it's a household service that many people rely on.. cutting that out to curb his habit when t is otherwise not needed is not exactly a real realistic idea.

    If no one else in the house uses the internet however, then just stopping service isn't a bad idea at all.

    EclecticGroove on
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    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    brett3k3 wrote:
    What you could do is attempt to contact Blizz, or have your parents contact Blizz, and possibly request to be IP-banned. I'm sure it could be done, probably by your parents rather than you.

    IP banning only works when static.. I know of almost no isp's that hand out static IP's anymore.

    EclecticGroove on
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    CirrusCirrus Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    port forwarding into a black hole just plain isn't working. I'll try the other thing, but this is proving to be difficult...

    Cirrus on
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    EclecticGrooveEclecticGroove Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    interesting. the only way it could not be working is if you are inadvertently forwarding it to your machines IP, not setting it up right, or wow will fall back to some other totally different port in order to connect if those are blocked.

    EclecticGroove on
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    ege02ege02 __BANNED USERS regular
    edited November 2006
    Having dealth with WoW before (both as an addict, and later as someone who has tried to get their friend(s) to quit), I agree that you need to intervene. He might get bitter, but in the end he will be thankful (whether he expresses this or not).

    If he cannot make the right decision, that means he is not mature enough to handle the responsibility of having that choice. And someone else will (and should) make it for him.

    ege02 on
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    JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Port forwarding won't work. Try port filtering instead. Just filter whatever ports WoW uses. I don't know where it will be in your router, so I'll post screenshots of mine:

    (I don't think these will break h-scroll, apologies if they do)

    screenshotur7.png

    screenshot1av8.png

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    CirrusCirrus Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Hmm. I cannot find Port Filtering for the life of me on my router. Anyone have any clue where it's buried in the WRT54G's menu?

    Cirrus on
  • Options
    JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Cirrus wrote:
    Hmm. I cannot find Port Filtering for the life of me on my router. Anyone have any clue where it's buried in the WRT54G's menu?

    It will probably be in the advanced options screen. If you can't find it in there, find the owner's manual or post a screenshot here.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    CirrusCirrus Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Here - my menu looks like this:

    Router.jpg

    That's the advanced Rouding menu - and there's no port filtering to be had.

    Anyone see where else it could be?

    Cirrus on
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    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2006
    Cirrus wrote:
    Yeah - I just tried forwarding it to a nonexistant IP, it seems to have done absolutely nothing. Still pops right onto WoW. So that's a bust...

    And yeah - I need something he wont' be able to easily change or look up how to change. I'm the only one who has even the vaguest notion how to change the settings on the router, so I was hoping I could do it from there...

    You can, but obviously there needs to be more ports blocked. Some applications are more robust than others so you would have to forward a number of ports.

    I'll look up the ports, but to make sure you are setting it up the screen is usually:

    a field for a name, just call it wow - start port - end port -protocol (choose both to be sure) - ip to forward to (just put 200 at the end) then a check box to enable settings.

    *edit:

    from blizzards support section:

    World of Warcraft uses the TCP protocol on port 3724.

    The Blizzard Downloader, which downloads patches, also uses TCP ports 6112 and the range 6881-6999.

    Based on that, create 2 entries, that will block the updater and the game itself if set up properly.

    So, keep in mind that 6881-6999 are typically used for BitTorrent. The Blizzard patcher downloads using BitTorrent, so if you block those ports, you're going to remove any ability to use BitTorrent as well.

    Premier kakos on
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    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2006
    Cirrus wrote:
    Here - my menu looks like this:

    Router.jpg

    That's the advanced Rouding menu - and there's no port filtering to be had.

    Anyone see where else it could be?

    It's under the "Applications & Gaming" tab.

    Premier kakos on
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    Lucky CynicLucky Cynic Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Doesn't WoW already have parental controls and timing restrictions and such?

    Lucky Cynic on
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    WuckFarcraftWuckFarcraft Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    noobert wrote:
    For lot's of people their virtual life is much more forfilling than their real life.

    Thats got to be the saddest thing I have ever heard.

    WuckFarcraft on
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    GlaealGlaeal Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Doesn't WoW already have parental controls and timing restrictions and such?
    Yeah, but if he set up his own account, how can anyone access them?

    And I'm guessing that this your brother is an adult, not a teenager, right?

    Glaeal on
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    CirrusCirrus Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    router2.jpg

    There's how it looks with the ports forwarded into oblivion, but that's still not working.

    And even there, I still can't find Port Filtering...

    Edit: No, he's not an adult. My brother's 16. Still in High School.

    Cirrus on
  • Options
    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2006
    Here is another way to do it and is the more complicated but sure-fire way of doing it.

    1) Click on "Access Restrictions" tab.
    2) Click on "Internet Access" tab.
    3) Go to the first internet access policy not in use (probably 1).
    4) Click the "Enabled" radio button for the "Status:" entry.
    5) Type in a policy name under "Enter Policy Name".
    6) "Policy Type:" should be "Internet Access"
    7) Click on the "Edit List" button under "PCs:"
    8) Enter his MAC address in MAC 01. Alternatively, if you want to block WoW from your house so he can't use an alternate computer, under "IP Range 01", fill in the two fields as "0 ~ 255".
    9) Click apply and close.
    10) Make sure "Day:" has "Everyday" checked and "Time:" has "24 Hours" selected.
    11) Click on the "Add/Edit Service" button in the "Blocked Services" section.
    12) Type in "WoW" for "Service Name" or whatever you want.
    13) Select "TCP" from the "Protocol" drop down box.
    13) Type in "3724-3724" for the ranges.
    14) Click the "Add" button and then click the "Apply" button and the window should close.
    15) Under one of the two drop down boxes above the "Add/Edit Service" button, click and select the "WoW" entry.
    16) Click "Save Settings" at the bottom and you should be done.

    Premier kakos on
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    NambkabNambkab Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Cirrus, change the type of protocol from both to TCP on that screen you showed.

    Also the above post should work too.

    Nambkab on
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    JaninJanin Registered User regular
    edited November 2006
    Nambkab wrote:
    Cirrus, change the type of protocol from both to TCP on that screen you showed.

    That won't do anything. WoW doesn't need forwarded ports to work. Kako's post is the way to go, though I'm surprised it's so complicated.

    Janin on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited November 2006
    So, a little knowledge for those interested. The reason the port forwarding to a black hole doesn't work is because that is forwarding incoming ports. WoW uses a random port as the incoming port, not port 3724; most clients programs do this. The one who uses the static port (port 3724 in this case) is the WoW server. You have to block outgoing ports to 3724, not incoming.

    Premier kakos on
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