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Daylight Savings Time wastes money

Smug DucklingSmug Duckling Registered User regular
edited March 2009 in Debate and/or Discourse
According to the Wall Street Journal, a study conducted on a few counties in Indiana that just switched over to DST, daylight savings time actually costs money contrary to popular belief.
For decades, conventional wisdom has held that daylight-saving time, which begins March 9, reduces energy use. But a unique situation in Indiana provides evidence challenging that view: Springing forward may actually waste energy.

Up until two years ago, only 15 of Indiana's 92 counties set their clocks an hour ahead in the spring and an hour back in the fall. The rest stayed on standard time all year, in part because farmers resisted the prospect of having to work an extra hour in the morning dark. But many residents came to hate falling in and out of sync with businesses and residents in neighboring states and prevailed upon the Indiana Legislature to put the entire state on daylight-saving time beginning in the spring of 2006.

Indiana's change of heart gave University of California-Santa Barbara economics professor Matthew Kotchen and Ph.D. student Laura Grant a unique way to see how the time shift affects energy use. Using more than seven million monthly meter readings from Duke Energy Corp., covering nearly all the households in southern Indiana for three years, they were able to compare energy consumption before and after counties began observing daylight-saving time. Readings from counties that had already adopted daylight-saving time provided a control group that helped them to adjust for changes in weather from one year to the next.

Their finding: Having the entire state switch to daylight-saving time each year, rather than stay on standard time, costs Indiana households an additional $8.6 million in electricity bills. They conclude that the reduced cost of lighting in afternoons during daylight-saving time is more than offset by the higher air-conditioning costs on hot afternoons and increased heating costs on cool mornings.

"I've never had a paper with such a clear and unambiguous finding as this," says Mr. Kotchen, who presented the paper at a National Bureau of Economic Research conference this month.

A 2007 study by economists Hendrik Wolff and Ryan Kellogg of the temporary extension of daylight-saving in two Australian territories for the 2000 Summer Olympics also suggested the clock change increases energy use.

That isn't what Benjamin Franklin would have expected. In 1784, he observed what an "immense sum! that the city of Paris might save every year, by the economy of using sunshine instead of candles." (Mr. Franklin didn't propose setting clocks forward, instead he satirically suggested levying a tax on window shutters, ringing church bells at sunrise and, if that didn't work, firing cannons down the street in order to rouse Parisians out of their beds earlier.)

During the first and second world wars, the U.S. temporarily enacted daylight-saving time as an energy-saving measure. Over time, most states began changing their clocks, and in response to the 1973 oil shock, the country extended daylight-saving time in 1974 and 1975. Analyzing that time shift, a 1975 report by the U.S. Department of Transportation concluded that the change reduced electricity demand by 1% in March and April. But in a 1976 report to Congress evaluating that analysis, the National Bureau of Standards concluded that there were no significant energy savings.

Still, the Transportation Department study stuck. Speaking before the House of Representatives in 2002, Indiana Rep. Julia Carson said that under daylight-saving time, Indiana families would save "over $7 million annually in electricity rates alone."

In 2005, Reps. Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts and Fred Upton of Michigan drafted legislation that would extend daylight-saving time nationwide. Congress approved the amendment, which called for clocks to be sprung forward three weeks earlier in the spring and one week later in the fall. The change went into effect last year.

The energy-savings numbers often cited by lawmakers and others come from research conducted in the 1970s. Yet a key difference between now and the '70s -- or, for that matter, Ben Franklin's time -- is the prevalence of air conditioning.

"In an inland state like Indiana, it gets hot in the summer," says Steve Gustafsen, a lawyer in New Albany, Ind., who filed a suit in 2000 in an effort to get his county to abandon daylight-saving time. "Daylight saving means running the air conditioner more."

That was borne out by the study by Mr. Kotchen and Ms. Grant. Their research showed that while an extra hour of daylight in the evenings may mean less electricity is spent on lights, it also means that houses are warmer in the summer when people come home from work. Conversely, during daylight-saving time's cooler months, people may crank up the thermostats more in the morning.

Still, the case on daylight-saving time isn't closed.

"My read on this study is that it's one data point that gives us something to think about," says Richard Stevie, an economist with Duke Energy, of Mr. Kotchen and Ms. Grant's research. "I think that additional research really needs to be done." And UCLA economist Matthew Kahn points out that even if the evidence on Indiana is airtight, the effect of daylight-saving time on other states might be different -- a point that Mr. Markey makes as well.

"One study of the situation in Indiana cannot accurately asses the impact of [daylight-saving time] changes across the nation, especially when it does not include more northern, colder regions," the congressman notes.

There may also be social benefits to daylight-saving time that weren't covered in the research. When the extension of daylight-saving time was proposed by Mr. Markey, he cited studies that noted "less crime, fewer traffic fatalities, more recreation time and increased economic activity" with the extra sunlight in the evening.

In Indiana, the debate goes on. "The simpler the issue, the more people have opinions about it," says Indiana State Rep. Scott Reske, who voted against the switch to daylight-saving time. In the aftermath of the time shift, "a lot of people who hated it now love it, and a lot of people who loved it now hate it," he says. A separate debate over whether the state should be on Central or Eastern Time rages on.

I hate DST and would love to get rid of it. It's a needless annoyance. In the modern world, no ones cares about this one hour shift in the hours of daylight. Given that it doesn't even save money as it has long been purported to, I think that it should be abolished.

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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I like DST. It keeps sunrise and sunset aligned around more sensible times.

    electricitylikesme on
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    KirbithKirbith I appear to be made of delicious cake. Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I hate DST. I am one of those people in Indiana, and yea, it does cost more money because in the mornings its dark and cold since the actual time we are getting up is ahead an hour of where it should be. Plus, it's weird to be on DST after not having to deal with it most my life haha.

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    TaximesTaximes Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I don't understand how DST can affect heating or air conditioning use. When it's cold, people turn on the heat. When it's hot, people turn on the AC. Who cares what time it is?

    Taximes on
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    Smug DucklingSmug Duckling Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Taximes wrote: »
    I don't understand how DST can affect heating or air conditioning use. When it's cold, people turn on the heat. When it's hot, people turn on the AC. Who cares what time it is?

    If you have blankets on, you don't need as much heating.

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    KirbithKirbith I appear to be made of delicious cake. Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Well, especially because we are switching earlier now, it makes it so that it is still very cold when people are waking up in the morning. Well, if someone was normally getting up at 7:30 for work, it would usually have warmed up a little by that time, and they might not need to turn their heat on. However, getting up at that same time during DST, it will be earlier in the day, and thus colder, and a lot more people will be turning their heat on. An hour of time really does make a big difference weather wise here.

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    mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Taximes wrote: »
    I don't understand how DST can affect heating or air conditioning use. When it's cold, people turn on the heat. When it's hot, people turn on the AC. Who cares what time it is?

    If you have blankets on, you don't need as much heating.

    Also affects places like schools and other buildings that are only occupied during business hours.

    I still say fuck it. I fondly remember not dealing with DST when I lived in Arizona.

    mcdermott on
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    wazillawazilla Having a late dinner Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Their finding: Having the entire state switch to daylight-saving time each year, rather than stay on standard time, costs Indiana households an additional $8.6 million in electricity bills.

    So, 8.6 million a year divided amongst all the households in Indiana.

    I understand the claim they are refuting is that it saves money so really any increase in expenditure would be sufficient to prove what they're after but I'm really not seeing this making much of a difference either way. (at least economically speaking)

    Also, isn't DST something that takes time to get used to? I wouldn't expect a ton of people dealing with it for the first time ever to go about adjusting in the most efficient ways.

    EDIT: Ok so the first 3 times since the study was done over the course of 3 years... It weakens my point a bit but I think it still stands.

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    OremLKOremLK Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Well, it makes a difference in convenience. Not sure why we should do something that is both more expensive (if that's conclusively true) and less convenient. Unfortunately this may be one of those things that nobody cares enough about anymore to bother changing, so we might be stuck with it.

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    TaximesTaximes Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Taximes wrote: »
    I don't understand how DST can affect heating or air conditioning use. When it's cold, people turn on the heat. When it's hot, people turn on the AC. Who cares what time it is?

    If you have blankets on, you don't need as much heating.

    Yeah, but I don't crank up the heat when I wake up, either...if it's cold, I just brave it for the half hour it takes me to get ready and leave for work. Maybe I'm just stingy. :P

    I guess I can see it costing more, though, especially with schools and business.

    Costs aside, I do like DST. Being more of an evening person, it's nice having it stay light an hour later.

    Taximes on
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    enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    DST will never be effective. The sun still rises and sets all the same. All we are doing is switching around the numbers on the clock.

    For that matter, I think it's time we abolish time zones altogether. GMT for all! It's a bit ridiculous that we don't even use uniform time codes on this planet. If E.T. ever visits, he'll laugh at us for the notion of time zones.

    enc0re on
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    Smug DucklingSmug Duckling Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    wazilla wrote: »
    Their finding: Having the entire state switch to daylight-saving time each year, rather than stay on standard time, costs Indiana households an additional $8.6 million in electricity bills.

    So, 8.6 million a year divided amongst all the households in Indiana.

    I understand the claim they are refuting is that it saves money so really any increase in expenditure would be sufficient to prove what they're after but I'm really not seeing this making much of a difference either way. (at least economically speaking)

    Actually that's true.

    There are 6345289 people in Indiana (as of a 2007 estimate), and 15 out of 92 counties were tracked in this study, meaning that

    $8600000 / (15/92 * 6345289 people) = $8.31 per person

    more was spent over the course of the study.

    Yeah... That's not actually that much.

    Still hate DST though.

    EDIT: saved = wasted. Way too late.

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    mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    wazilla wrote: »
    Their finding: Having the entire state switch to daylight-saving time each year, rather than stay on standard time, costs Indiana households an additional $8.6 million in electricity bills.

    So, 8.6 million a year divided amongst all the households in Indiana.

    I understand the claim they are refuting is that it saves money so really any increase in expenditure would be sufficient to prove what they're after but I'm really not seeing this making much of a difference either way. (at least economically speaking)

    Actually that's true.

    There are 6345289 people in Indiana (as of a 2007 estimate), and 15 out of 92 counties were tracked in this study, meaning that

    $8600000 / (15/92 * 6345289 people) = $8.31 per person

    were saved over the course of the study.

    Yeah... That's not actually that much.

    Still hate DST though.

    Unless I'm reading the quote tree wrong, t hat's actually $8.31 more spent per-person to do DST. So spending more to be inconvenienced.

    mcdermott on
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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    enc0re wrote: »
    DST will never be effective. The sun still rises and sets all the same. All we are doing is switching around the numbers on the clock.
    The sunrise and set times change all year round. DST helps keep it lined up with the normal times people are active. Crucially, it means that work finishes somewhat sooner compared to when the sun goes down in the summer, which I treat as a bonus.
    enc0re wrote: »
    For that matter, I think it's time we abolish time zones altogether. GMT for all! It's a bit ridiculous that we don't even use uniform time codes on this planet. If E.T. ever visits, he'll laugh at us for the notion of time zones.
    Time zones allow us to sensibly understand the time of day in other regions. 6am we expect to be round about sunrise most places, 5-7 round about sunset. It would not be unbearable, but it would be senselessly complicated if we couldn't easily figure out what the time of day was in other areas just by looking at their clock.

    Currently we can - because some general rules apply. That doesn't work if you need to remember a bunch of time of days.

    electricitylikesme on
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    RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I like DST. It keeps sunrise and sunset aligned around more sensible times.
    This.

    Also, people who complain it's hard to "deal with" DST are silly. Twice a year you move your clocks one hour. You don't even need to remember when or in which direction: modern computers take care of it for you. It couldn't be easier. An hour offset shouldn't be too much for your body to adapt to, it's less than most jetlags you'll feel while travelling. OMG ABOLISH TIME ZONES?

    Richy on
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    the_Willardthe_Willard Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    personally...i fucking hate DST. This year in particular was bad; when the clocks got set back an hour, i happened to be working an 11pm-7am shift so i got to work for an extra hour, and when they got set forward it was on one of my "adjustment days" i get off between working nights shift and morning shift so i LOST an hour of sleep after having stayed up all night and having to go into work at 7am the next day.

    fuck daylight savings time, fuck it in its stupid ass.


    (my point being, if it serves no real purpose other than to annoy people...why do we still do it?)

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    OremLKOremLK Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Richy wrote: »
    I like DST. It keeps sunrise and sunset aligned around more sensible times.
    This.

    Also, people who complain it's hard to "deal with" DST are silly. Twice a year you move your clocks one hour. You don't even need to remember when or in which direction: modern computers take care of it for you. It couldn't be easier. An hour offset shouldn't be too much for your body to adapt to, it's less than most jetlags you'll feel while travelling. OMG ABOLISH TIME ZONES?

    It's not that it's particularly hard to deal with, it's just that the adjustment (by which I am not referring to the simple act of changing your clocks) is inconvenient.

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    Smug DucklingSmug Duckling Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    mcdermott wrote: »
    wazilla wrote: »
    Their finding: Having the entire state switch to daylight-saving time each year, rather than stay on standard time, costs Indiana households an additional $8.6 million in electricity bills.

    So, 8.6 million a year divided amongst all the households in Indiana.

    I understand the claim they are refuting is that it saves money so really any increase in expenditure would be sufficient to prove what they're after but I'm really not seeing this making much of a difference either way. (at least economically speaking)

    Actually that's true.

    There are 6345289 people in Indiana (as of a 2007 estimate), and 15 out of 92 counties were tracked in this study, meaning that

    $8600000 / (15/92 * 6345289 people) = $8.31 per person

    were saved over the course of the study.

    Yeah... That's not actually that much.

    Still hate DST though.

    Unless I'm reading the quote tree wrong, t hat's actually $8.31 more spent per-person to do DST. So spending more to be inconvenienced.

    Oops. Wrote the wrong word. Good catch.

    Smug Duckling on
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    GoodKingJayIIIGoodKingJayIII They wanna get my gold on the ceilingRegistered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I'm wondering if being in EST Indiana is somehow affecting the study differently than say, EST in some part further east. It might be 8am here in CT and 8am somewhere in Indiana, but the sun is not in the same position relative to the time in the time zone.

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    Premier kakosPremier kakos Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited March 2009
    I say we solve all of our problems and blow up the sun.

    Actually, DST is pretty stupid these days. At one point, back in the time of oil lamps and fireplaces, it likely did save energy. Now, however, it doesn't matter or, as this study might indicate, actually costing money and energy. Of course, I also think we should abolish time zones all together and move to decimal time.

    Premier kakos on
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    RichyRichy Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I say we solve all of our problems and ignite Jupiter.
    Two suns on opposite sides. Eternal daytime. No more problems.

    Richy on
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    iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Cornfield? Cornfield.Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I'd be happy if we could get everyone in Indiana in the same fucking timezone. Damn north-west part of the state! You hear that Lake and Porter counties? You're a pain in my ass; especially when I have to make trips up there and then I show up at the wrong time because you guys wanna be on Illinois-time.

    What's with all the time-zone hate though guys? Doing away with it entirely seems... difficult.

    iTunesIsEvil on
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    THEPAIN73THEPAIN73 Shiny. Real shiny.Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    The fact is that most people in Indiana are new to the idea and need to get over it.

    I did. In fact, we were frowned upon for NOT doing it.

    People need to quit being so lazy and get the hell out of bed.

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    MalaysianShrewMalaysianShrew Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    If we got rid of time zones, every town and locale would go back to deciding it's own schedules. So while in your town most people would work 9-5, in the next town over they might work 830-430 because they think it fits the daylight there better. And god help you if you tried to find a job in another state. 13-21? Is that an opening shift?

    Also, at the beginning and end of DST the times are always really screwy. You start waking up in the dark and you are upset but a month later and the times fit much better than they would have. But you don't think about DST a month after a switch.

    MalaysianShrew on
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    mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I'd be happy if we could get everyone in Indiana in the same fucking timezone. Damn north-west part of the state! You hear that Lake and Porter counties? You're a pain in my ass; especially when I have to make trips up there and then I show up at the wrong time because you guys wanna be on Illinois-time.

    What's with all the time-zone hate though guys? Doing away with it entirely seems... difficult.

    Doing away with slavery was difficult too.
    PLEASE DON'T HURT ME.

    Seriously, though, it's annoying and may cost money and energy. Seems like this would make getting rid of it worth it. Very few devices nowadays lack the ability to update timekeeping software/firmware (or receive time automatically, like cellphones), so really it would be no more difficult than it was to change the DST dates...last year?

    If only we had used that effort to do away with it instead, we'd already be done.

    mcdermott on
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    FunkyWaltDoggFunkyWaltDogg Columbia, SCRegistered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Living in South Carolina, I would definitely appreciate my house having an extra hour to cool off in the afternoon before I get home. Plus daylight at 9PM just seems wrong somehow, even though I've always lived with it in the summer.

    FunkyWaltDogg on
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    enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    enc0re wrote: »
    DST will never be effective. The sun still rises and sets all the same. All we are doing is switching around the numbers on the clock.
    The sunrise and set times change all year round. DST helps keep it lined up with the normal times people are active. Crucially, it means that work finishes somewhat sooner compared to when the sun goes down in the summer, which I treat as a bonus.

    But DST doesn't change when the sun sets or rises one bit. Now, if we all want to agree to have work start and end one hour earlier during the Summer, I'm cool with that. But changing the actual time code? Ridiculous.
    enc0re wrote: »
    For that matter, I think it's time we abolish time zones altogether. GMT for all! It's a bit ridiculous that we don't even use uniform time codes on this planet. If E.T. ever visits, he'll laugh at us for the notion of time zones.
    Time zones allow us to sensibly understand the time of day in other regions. 6am we expect to be round about sunrise most places, 5-7 round about sunset. It would not be unbearable, but it would be senselessly complicated if we couldn't easily figure out what the time of day was in other areas just by looking at their clock.

    Currently we can - because some general rules apply. That doesn't work if you need to remember a bunch of time of days.

    It's currently easy to understand that 6AM ~= sunrise, because we have to remember all those stupid time zones to begin with! Under world-wide GMT, you would always know the time code around the world (it's the same), but would instead have to figure out sunrise/sunset times. That's no more difficult than remembering time zones, e.g. UK would still roughly be U.S. Eastern + 5 hours.

    The arguments in favor of DST and time zones remind me of the arguments against the metric system. Like, some people argue that since 1 lbs = 0.45359237 kg, it's better to remember the "easy" imperial measure than the "hard" metric measure. Which of course is rubbish. It's all a matter of what your original reference point is.

    enc0re on
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    Feels Good ManFeels Good Man Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Richy wrote: »
    I say we solve all of our problems and ignite Jupiter.
    Two suns on opposite sides. Eternal daytime. No more problems.

    Contrary to popular belief, Earth is not the center of the solar system. :P



    Also, DST sucks. My roommate was telling me that 5% more heart attacks happen during DST; I think it was probably a terrible study but I'm willing to cite unscientific statistics in order to slay DST.

    Feels Good Man on
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    ProtoProto Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    DST is great! Why wouldn't you want more daylight in the evenings?

    Proto on
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    mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Proto wrote: »
    DST is great! Why wouldn't you want more daylight in the evenings?

    Because it's hot as fuck and my work is air-conditioned while my house is not?

    mcdermott on
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    mystikspyralmystikspyral Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    I live in AK. We get very little sunlight here during the winter. I can see why people who live in areas with more sunlight might not care but I appreciate the spring forward. It means I might actually see a little sun before work. During most of the winter I go to work in the dark, see the sunlight through the windows, and then go home in the dark at 3PM.

    Edit: Although by the time spring forward hits I'm usually seeing at least a little light after work. Yay!

    mystikspyral on
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    ProtoProto Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    mcdermott wrote: »
    Proto wrote: »
    DST is great! Why wouldn't you want more daylight in the evenings?

    Because it's hot as fuck and my work is air-conditioned while my house is not?

    Then step into the 20th century and get AC. :P


    Let me tell you, I wait for DST all winter. Finally it won't be pitch black out at 5:00. Plus once we get into summer it's nice to be able to walk around and actually do stuff outside after work.

    Proto on
    and her knees up on the glove compartment
    took out her barrettes and her hair spilled out like rootbeer
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    GungHoGungHo Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Down south, DST means it's still light until 8:30 or so during mid summer.

    I don't care either way. Just wish they'd pick one and stop fucking with it. Hell, make it :30 mins for the whole year and split the difference.

    GungHo on
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    DuffelDuffel jacobkosh Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Yeah, seriously. DST is one of my favorite parts of the year. If I had my choice we wouldn't go off DST.

    Also, anybody who thinks it's "weird" to have daylight at 9 pm should go a few lines of latitude north of where they're at. When I was in Ireland a few years ago it didn't get dark until nearly 11 in the middle of summer. Crazy stuff. Made it really easy to get up early in the morning, though, although I imagine the winters would be hell.

    Duffel on
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    JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Richy wrote: »
    I say we solve all of our problems and ignite Jupiter.
    Two suns on opposite sides. Eternal daytime. No more problems.

    Till we have an eclipse and everyone goes crazy and burns down society.

    JebusUD on
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    GoodKingJayIIIGoodKingJayIII They wanna get my gold on the ceilingRegistered User regular
    edited March 2009
    JebusUD wrote: »
    Richy wrote: »
    I say we solve all of our problems and ignite Jupiter.
    Two suns on opposite sides. Eternal daytime. No more problems.

    Till we have an eclipse and everyone goes crazy and burns down society.

    Sold!

    GoodKingJayIII on
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    JebusUDJebusUD Adventure! Candy IslandRegistered User regular
    edited March 2009
    enc0re wrote: »

    It's currently easy to understand that 6AM ~= sunrise, because we have to remember all those stupid time zones to begin with! Under world-wide GMT, you would always know the time code around the world (it's the same), but would instead have to figure out sunrise/sunset times. That's no more difficult than remembering time zones, e.g. UK would still roughly be U.S. Eastern + 5 hours.

    The arguments in favor of DST and time zones remind me of the arguments against the metric system. Like, some people argue that since 1 lbs = 0.45359237 kg, it's better to remember the "easy" imperial measure than the "hard" metric measure. Which of course is rubbish. It's all a matter of what your original reference point is.

    It works better for business the current way. Easier to adjust to travel, since you have a general idea when stores are open and when things are closed. When the liquor store opens...

    Plus, who gets to decide where noon is? I would hate to be the shitty country that gets to have 3 AM as mid day.

    JebusUD on
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    enc0reenc0re Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    JebusUD wrote: »
    enc0re wrote: »

    It's currently easy to understand that 6AM ~= sunrise, because we have to remember all those stupid time zones to begin with! Under world-wide GMT, you would always know the time code around the world (it's the same), but would instead have to figure out sunrise/sunset times. That's no more difficult than remembering time zones, e.g. UK would still roughly be U.S. Eastern + 5 hours.

    The arguments in favor of DST and time zones remind me of the arguments against the metric system. Like, some people argue that since 1 lbs = 0.45359237 kg, it's better to remember the "easy" imperial measure than the "hard" metric measure. Which of course is rubbish. It's all a matter of what your original reference point is.

    It works better for business the current way. Easier to adjust to travel, since you have a general idea when stores are open and when things are closed. When the liquor store opens...

    Why would it be easier to adjust to travel? Let's take NY City -> London.
    Now you have to remember: Stores open at 9:00AM in both locations. Also London is +5 hours.
    Under my glorious system: NY and London have the same time. Also London stores open 5 hours earlier.

    In fact, since there is a significant probability that stores don't open a 9:00AM local (current system) around the world, you have to remember both, time zone and opening-hour difference. Under my system, you never have to remember time zones and only ever have to remember opening-hour difference.
    JebusUD wrote: »
    Plus, who gets to decide where noon is? I would hate to be the shitty country that gets to have 3 AM as mid day.

    Clearly, the reference time we'd all adopt is GMT. AKA: 0° longitude, Zulu time.

    enc0re on
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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Man what the fuck? If I get off the plane in London, I look a the time there and I know whether or not I can expect businesses to be open, whether calling people locally would be prudent etc.

    Under your system I take a guess that the sun is up and so maybe businesses are open coz what the fuck are there business hours here?

    EDIT: Your system is stupid. If I'm somewhere, I don't need to know what timezone it is I just need to set my watch to one of their clocks. Boom! I'm in sync with the locals. Your system requires me to constantly recall two arbitrary numbers.

    Which as pointed out, will vary on a town-by-town basis just because.

    electricitylikesme on
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    ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited March 2009
    I hate DST. I also think it's ass-fucking backwards. Because of DST, it gets dark in the winter at about 4:30 and it gets dark in the summer at about 9:00. The former is stupidly early and the latter is stupidly late. Why not switch it, so it gets dark in the winter at 5:30 and dark in the summer at 8:00?

    And now it apparently also costs us more to implement this stupid, backwards, inconvenient system.

    Grrrrr.

    ElJeffe on
    I submitted an entry to Lego Ideas, and if 10,000 people support me, it'll be turned into an actual Lego set!If you'd like to see and support my submission, follow this link.
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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited March 2009
    Yeah you Americans probably shouldn't do it. Works better for us equatorial types.

    electricitylikesme on
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