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JohnTWM's Awesome Thread(NewPortrait, largest piece of work to date)

JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
edited October 2009 in Artist's Corner
Ok maybe not that awesome, but here is all the doodles/finished stuff I could find on short notice. Finally decided to make a thread of my own instead of just lurking and occasionally posting stuff in doodle.
HoboHero
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Progress Shots spoilered
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Om-nom-inable Snowman
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Satan's Teapot
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Sketchdump (spoilered for H-scroll pwn)
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JohnTWM on

Posts

  • MustangMustang Arbiter of Unpopular Opinions Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    This is really weird.....there are like major jumps up and down in skill level from one drawing to the next.
    Either you're not drawing enough to maintain your skill level or you're being lazy with a lot of them.

    Anyway, your pie drawing is the best of this bunch, you should try to maintain that level of quality for all your drawings and improve from there.

    Mustang on
  • JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Oh yes I should mention that these come from a span of like the last 3 years and I failed to order them chronologically. The pie one is one of the more recent, from like 5 months ago and I also used photo refs for it where as most of the other pics are class room doodles.

    JohnTWM on
  • MustangMustang Arbiter of Unpopular Opinions Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Oh in that case, you should remove all the ones that you feel don't represent your current skill level. Otherwise you'll end up with a bunch of redunant critiques that will be next to useless to you.

    Mustang on
  • JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Mustang wrote: »
    Oh in that case, you should remove all the ones that you feel don't represent your current skill level. Otherwise you'll end up with a bunch of redunant critiques that will be next to useless to you.

    This seems like an excellent suggestion. I wish there was a way to edit the post where it still had the images shown, because honestly they aren't named in a way that will tell me what they are >.>

    EDIT: Done. (But it's hard to judge my own stuff so I might have left somethings that still aren't up to my current level)

    JohnTWM on
  • srsizzysrsizzy Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    JohnTWM wrote: »
    Mustang wrote: »
    Oh in that case, you should remove all the ones that you feel don't represent your current skill level. Otherwise you'll end up with a bunch of redunant critiques that will be next to useless to you.

    This seems like an excellent suggestion. I wish there was a way to edit the post where it still had the images shown, because honestly they aren't named in a way that will tell me what they are >.>
    That's what tabs in firefox are for.

    of the two works above, the line art in the first one is incredibly inconsistent with the superior line art in the second one. the first one could not have been done with photoshop, correct? yet the second one appears to have been done with photoshop, and is very pleasing to look at. good line weight, and an overall better drawing. work on form and anatomy more for cartoony characters like that first one; it's not doing to well. it's pretty blocky and boring, whereas the forms in the second are a little more dynamic and appealing.

    srsizzy on
    BRO LET ME GET REAL WITH YOU AND SAY THAT MY FINGERS ARE PREPPED AND HOT LIKE THE SURFACE OF THE SUN TO BRING RADICAL BEATS SO SMOOTH THE SHIT WILL BE MEDICINAL-GRADE TRIPNASTY MAKING ALL BRAINWAVES ROLL ON THE SURFACE OF A BALLS-FEISTY NEURAL RAINBOW CRACKA-LACKIN' YOUR PERCEPTION OF THE HERE-NOW SPACE-TIME SITUATION THAT ALL OF LIFE BE JAMMED UP IN THROUGH THE UNIVERSAL FLOW BEATS
  • PojPoj Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I guess I'm not sure how new the digital stuff is versus the traditional/sketchy stuff, but I would definitely definitely say your pencil/pen stuff is a lot stronger. Something really gets lost in translation between your sketchpad and the computer. One thing you could try is inking traditionally and then coloring digitally, perhaps. In any case, I like the concept of HoboHero (lol) but the inking looks incredibly amateurish. It looks like you're either A) inking too slow so the lines are all wobbly or B) inking with a mouse. If B is the case, ink traditionally, period. If you have a tablet, try and make use of the pressure sensitivity (if you have it) and just keep with the practice.

    I think those ballpoint TF2 sketches are my favorite of the lot.

    Poj on
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  • JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Thanks for the comments guys.

    @srsizzy: I actually did both of them in Gimp. Significantly more time was spent on the second one's line art.

    @ Poj: It's B. I do not own a tablet or (currently) a scanner, so I just took a picture of the lineart and then put it in gimp, blow it up and copy over with a mouse. The reason the second one is so superior, is that the first one I took a medium size pen tool and just copied over. The second one I did the same thing for the most part, but I used thinner lines for the detail bits, and then I spent about an hour (possibly more, I honestly don't know) using the eraser tool to thin out the lines, make the tips on the hair bits, all that. If someone knows a better way, then by all means let me know, but I do not own photoshop or any other imaging software (also mspaint).

    As for traditional inking, I would love to do it that way, but then I would feel weird coloring it digitally, I also do not own any good inking or coloring tools other than colored pencils which you can see from the 3rd image, I am no expert with. If you can suggest something that is good for inking and is also cheap I might check it out, cause that would be fun, but right now I'm focusing on improving my pencil work, specifically crosshatching tutorials because I cannot do it so save my life.

    JohnTWM on
  • PojPoj Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Did somebody say crosshatching? :O

    Don't have a scanner? Hmm, that would make the whole process a lot more difficult. I'd say if you're really interested in digital work, you should definitely invest in one because it makes the whole process a lot easier to get into. When you do, you can really use any kind of inking tool you're comfortable with and then scan it in black and white (or maybe grayscale, if you wanted to scan those ballpoint sketches). I'm kind of a noob when it comes to the finer points of digital work myself, but the first passable program I acquainted myself with was OpenCanas 1.1. You'll have to use another program if you want to add text, but it's a great beginning program, I think. I've actually spent many a long hour with the eraser tool the way you have, and I'd say in the long term you should definitely go out and buy a tablet. You'll save yourself hours of pain that way.

    By the way, stay away from MS Paint unless you want something to look intentionally low-budget. I've been able to find a free program online (without pirating anything) that has trumped MS Paint in some way on every single thing it can do. If you're interested in a complete list or want to know how to do something without resorting to MS Paint, PM me and I'd be happy to tell you an alternative.

    Poj on
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  • JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Gimp is free and while I'm not good enough with it yet to say whether or not it compares to photoshop, it is at least capable of most of doing the advanced things that photoshop is capable of doing. I don't use paint ever, I was just joking, meant to imply that I didnt have any software other than gimp except for paint which I obviously didn't want to use lol.

    I would really like to get a tablet, it is one of my goals, but I am in school and only working part time, so pretty much all of my money goes to food and rent. But someday one shall be mine!

    I actually own two scanners, but they are both currently not functioning. I'm working on the problem.

    JohnTWM on
  • PojPoj Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    It seems like GIMP is working for you, so that's awesome. I've never had a fully-functional version of that program and it's always ended with me wanting to punch it in the face, so I'm glad your experiences are better than mine have been.

    I actually DID have an MS Paint phase. It was horrible. I'm never sure if people are kidding about that because it happened to me. :(

    Poj on
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  • JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    oh no. I definitely used to spend hours in paint. But that wasn't attempting to create anything, but rather I would photo edit with paint. I took a perverse pleasure in spending hours upon hours doing something I could do in about 5 minutes with PS. There is nothing quite like simulating the clone tool one pixel at a time.

    JohnTWM on
  • crawdaddiocrawdaddio Tacoma, WARegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2009
    It might help you with your inking/no-working-scanner problem to take a careful picture of your drawing (by which I mean setting your camera down so you don't get the shakes, and setting the exposure to make the paper as light as possible (no flash!), and then using the Threshold tool in the Colors menu to set the thing to black-and-white (or, alternately, to fiddle with the Curves tool). I've managed to capture drawings at a level reasonably close to what my scanner could manage with my digital camera.

    crawdaddio on
  • JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    crawdaddio wrote: »
    It might help you with your inking/no-working-scanner problem to take a careful picture of your drawing (by which I mean setting your camera down so you don't get the shakes, and setting the exposure to make the paper as light as possible (no flash!), and then using the Threshold tool in the Colors menu to set the thing to black-and-white (or, alternately, to fiddle with the Curves tool). I've managed to capture drawings at a level reasonably close to what my scanner could manage with my digital camera.

    Ill have to try that, converting the picture to B&W that is. My biggest problem with actually taking the pictures is finding a decent light source to illuminate the picture. All the lighting in my apartment is super yellow so that is why I usually just digitally ink over the photo and dump everything else.

    JohnTWM on
  • crawdaddiocrawdaddio Tacoma, WARegistered User, ClubPA regular
    edited May 2009
    JohnTWM wrote: »
    crawdaddio wrote: »
    It might help you with your inking/no-working-scanner problem to take a careful picture of your drawing (by which I mean setting your camera down so you don't get the shakes, and setting the exposure to make the paper as light as possible (no flash!), and then using the Threshold tool in the Colors menu to set the thing to black-and-white (or, alternately, to fiddle with the Curves tool). I've managed to capture drawings at a level reasonably close to what my scanner could manage with my digital camera.

    Ill have to try that, converting the picture to B&W that is. My biggest problem with actually taking the pictures is finding a decent light source to illuminate the picture. All the lighting in my apartment is super yellow so that is why I usually just digitally ink over the photo and dump everything else.

    You could try setting a custom white-balance on your camera based on a blank sheet of paper from your sketchbook (how you do that depends on what camera you've got), or, like you said, you could make it greyscale, which is really the better (easier) option, since you don't need your picture to be color to ink it, anyway. What I meant by the black-and-white was literally only black and white--it's kind of the quick-and-dirty way of getting cleaner lines on the computer. The threshold refers to the point at which the program decides what's white and what's black, which you can adjust to get as much of the lines without too much of the paper. It's easier if you actually ink it (because the black is blacker, so it stands out more, and because ink lines are generally cleaner than pencil), but it ought to work either way.

    Also, all things considered, as long as you've got a steady place to rest your camera (and a self-timer option), you can get by with suprisingly little light; you just have to make sure it falls reasonably evenly on the paper.

    crawdaddio on
  • PojPoj Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    On a nice day, I used to sometimes photograph my work outside.

    Poj on
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  • JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Poj wrote: »
    On a nice day, I used to sometimes photograph my work outside.

    Aaaaaghhurgh! THE LIGHT, IT BURNS USSSssss...

    JohnTWM on
  • JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Mother's Day card for my mom who loves elephants
    elephantcard.png
    Done after reading S_O Inking Tutorial in an attempt to apply some of the techniques described.

    JohnTWM on
  • JohnTWMJohnTWM Registered User regular
    edited October 2009
    brandontz.png Art midterm
    also shoes
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    JohnTWM on
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