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Personal Information for Security Clearance

QuidQuid Definitely not a bananaRegistered User regular
edited December 2006 in Help / Advice Forum
So I'm going to be changing to a new job but it's going to require a high security clearance. I have nothing to hide, but for the questionaire I'll need to know where I lived, worked, and who I worked for over the last ten years, none of which I've really kept track of. I've seen various sites that offer personal information for a price, which I don't mind paying if it works, but I'd like to know if anyone has experience with which ones do. Otherwise it's going to be a long slog trying to get in touch with people who might still have this info.

Quid on

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    headn00bheadn00b Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Before you consider spending money to get this info, are ou sure you don't have any old bills/pay slips etc that may have some of the info you're looking for?

    In my experience when a company is looking for that much information they don't expect complete accuracy, so if you can remember roughly which years you were employed by different companies it would probably be enough for them. I guess it depends on the job though.

    headn00b on
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    QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    headn00b wrote:
    Before you consider spending money to get this info, are ou sure you don't have any old bills/pay slips etc that may have some of the info you're looking for?

    In my experience when a company is looking for that much information they don't expect complete accuracy, so if you can remember roughly which years you were employed by different companies it would probably be enough for them. I guess it depends on the job though.
    Er, this company is the Navy and the stuff I'd be doing they probably won't treat too lightly. And I had absolutely no bills until after I was 19. It's mostly the time before that that I'm concerned and I have no personal information in my possession anywhere going past a few moths ago.

    Quid on
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    electricitylikesmeelectricitylikesme Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Quid wrote:
    headn00b wrote:
    Before you consider spending money to get this info, are ou sure you don't have any old bills/pay slips etc that may have some of the info you're looking for?

    In my experience when a company is looking for that much information they don't expect complete accuracy, so if you can remember roughly which years you were employed by different companies it would probably be enough for them. I guess it depends on the job though.
    Er, this company is the Navy and the stuff I'd be doing they probably won't treat too lightly. And I had absolutely no bills until after I was 19. It's mostly the time before that that I'm concerned and I have no personal information in my possession anywhere going past a few moths ago.
    Could you try contacting the IRS? Surely if you've been earning an income you've been filing taxes, so presumably they - being the IRS - haven't lost any of it. And I'm pretty sure they'd have to give it to you if you asked.

    electricitylikesme on
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    CangoFettCangoFett Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    If you can remember where you worked, I imagine you could try calling them and asking what dates and whatnot they have you working there on record.


    Also, the form on the security clearance is really just a formality. If its of any importance, some nice men in suits will be making a lot of phone calls and visits to those you've known.

    CangoFett on
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    Low KeyLow Key Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    A guy I know just went through a similar process to get into the Feds. He said his bank had a lot of records of employment details and the rest of it he'd got pretty easily by backtracking through conversations with friends and family. That'll be a bitch though if you've done a lot of share house living.

    Low Key on
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    RonjonRonjon Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    my brother had to go through (navy intel HooRah) this. what you need, is someone to vouch for you for each month of the 10 years, so between me, my parents and his one roomate, we were able to say we saw him on a weekly basis for the entire time and they didn't seem to notice that he forgot atleast 3 jobs he'd had in his information. They were extra tough on him because we have cousins in Jordan. EEEK.

    Ronjon on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    RonjonRonjon Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    CangoFett wrote:
    If you can remember where you worked, I imagine you could try calling them and asking what dates and whatnot they have you working there on record.


    Also, the form on the security clearance is really just a formality. If its of any importance, some nice men in suits will be making a lot of phone calls and visits to those you've known.
    Nice seems a little generous, the guy who did my brother's just showed up at my job asking for me one day (my boss called and said there was a man from the government looking for me and the guy wouldn't say why he needed me, started some fun work rumors :) ).

    Ronjon on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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    MishraMishra Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Check your credit report as well. Usually they're fairly understanding. For example I travel a lot, so when they asked where I'd been I simply had to say Mexico Various times, Italy Various times. The key to getting a clearance quickly is be as up to date as possible. Have current addresses for everyone you list. Then when the investigator finally calls go through everyone you listed and double check that you can still get in touch with them and have any new contact info on hand for the investigator.

    Really what they're checking for is consitancy in story, they ask the same questions to multiple people and look for incositancies. So they don't like to see gaps in dates, or time that can't be accounted for. Also once you fill out your papwerwork keep a hard copy, if you renew or get a higher clearance they'll want everything to line up. If you've got any specific questions feel free to PM me.

    What clearance are you going for Secret, TS, SCI?

    Mishra on
    "Give a man a fire, he's warm for the night. Set a man on fire he's warm for the rest of his life."
    -Terry Pratchett
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    GlaealGlaeal Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Ronjon wrote:
    CangoFett wrote:
    If you can remember where you worked, I imagine you could try calling them and asking what dates and whatnot they have you working there on record.


    Also, the form on the security clearance is really just a formality. If its of any importance, some nice men in suits will be making a lot of phone calls and visits to those you've known.
    Nice seems a little generous, the guy who did my brother's just showed up at my job asking for me one day (my boss called and said there was a man from the government looking for me and the guy wouldn't say why he needed me, started some fun work rumors :) ).

    I loved the phone calls I got when they were finalizing my stuff. My mom freaked out because the FBI had showed up at her house asking all kinds of questions.

    Glaeal on
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    locomotivemanlocomotiveman Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Speaking of mothers, if yours is still with us I'm sure she's got an address book at home that has all your addresses since you moved out. After all sometimes you need to send presents to children who can't get home for Christmas.

    locomotiveman on
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    mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Quid wrote:
    So I'm going to be changing to a new job but it's going to require a high security clearance. I have nothing to hide, but for the questionaire I'll need to know where I lived, worked, and who I worked for over the last ten years, none of which I've really kept track of. I've seen various sites that offer personal information for a price, which I don't mind paying if it works, but I'd like to know if anyone has experience with which ones do. Otherwise it's going to be a long slog trying to get in touch with people who might still have this info.

    Out of curiosity, how old are you? I know that when I had to do mine, my credit report covered all the way back to high school for me, and from there I just contacted the schools I had attended for addresses. Getting ahold of parents is a good idea too.

    As far as dates go, I don't know how strict they are for TS+ clearances, but for secret I basically took the whole "to the best of my knowledge" part literally. I know that all the dates I gave were accurate +/- a couple months, at which point any investigator should have no problems working from there...but the shit wasn't exact. The hardest part of the whole thing was tracking down contact info for my references from each place.

    mcdermott on
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    GlaealGlaeal Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    mcdermott wrote:
    Quid wrote:
    So I'm going to be changing to a new job but it's going to require a high security clearance. I have nothing to hide, but for the questionaire I'll need to know where I lived, worked, and who I worked for over the last ten years, none of which I've really kept track of. I've seen various sites that offer personal information for a price, which I don't mind paying if it works, but I'd like to know if anyone has experience with which ones do. Otherwise it's going to be a long slog trying to get in touch with people who might still have this info.

    Out of curiosity, how old are you? I know that when I had to do mine, my credit report covered all the way back to high school for me, and from there I just contacted the schools I had attended for addresses. Getting ahold of parents is a good idea too.

    As far as dates go, I don't know how strict they are for TS+ clearances, but for secret I basically took the whole "to the best of my knowledge" part literally. I know that all the dates I gave were accurate +/- a couple months, at which point any investigator should have no problems working from there...but the shit wasn't exact. The hardest part of the whole thing was tracking down contact info for my references from each place.

    For TS+ they'll interview your parents anyway. As long as you can give them everything to the best of your knowledge, you should be ok.

    Barring drug offenses, getting expelled, shit like that.

    Glaeal on
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    QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Mishra wrote:
    What clearance are you going for Secret, TS, SCI/TK?
    TS will be the minimum. Afterwards it'll depend on where my orders send me and what I'll be doing that'll decide if I need higher.

    Quid on
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    GlaealGlaeal Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Quid wrote:
    Mishra wrote:
    What clearance are you going for Secret, TS, SCI/TK?
    TS will be the minimum. Afterwards it'll depend on where my orders send me and what I'll be doing that'll decide if I need higher.

    They'll do your SSBI for TS/SCI, then if the SCI is not necessary they'll downgrade you.

    If you're looking to be a contractor, try REALLY hard to hold onto the SCI. Good money.

    Glaeal on
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    TheBurritoManTheBurritoMan Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    What stage are you at in your Navy process? I'm guessing you're at CID, from the sounds of it.

    TheBurritoMan on
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    QuidQuid Definitely not a banana Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    What stage are you at in your Navy process? I'm guessing you're at CID, from the sounds of it.
    I have no idea what that is. I'm in Iraq at the moment and rather than spend another horrendous moment in Gulfport MS I'm trying to get the rate change process done here so I can stop there for a couple months tops, take my record, and never again return.

    Quid on
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    TheBurritoManTheBurritoMan Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Oh. I thought you were just joining, in which case you could have just used your contacts from when you did your Secret in boot. I would not reccomend getting info from offline, as they generally like to go to whoever's house you put down and talk to the person face to face.

    TheBurritoMan on
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    ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Oh. I thought you were just joining, in which case you could have just used your contacts from when you did your Secret in boot. I would not reccomend getting info from offline, as they generally like to go to whoever's house you put down and talk to the person face to face.
    He's trying to get their addresses/phone numbers so they can do that.

    Thanatos on
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    CephalicCarnageCephalicCarnage Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    I made up a bunch of crap. Real names, fake phone numbers and addresses. but then again, my security clearance was for a military job, might be a little easier for me than for w/e it is you are doing.

    CephalicCarnage on
    We are not evil because of the evil things we do, we do evil because we ARE evil.
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    GlaealGlaeal Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    I made up a bunch of crap. Real names, fake phone numbers and addresses. but then again, my security clearance was for a military job, might be a little easier for me than for w/e it is you are doing.

    Quid, don't do this.

    Just don't.

    Glaeal on
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    ThanatosThanatos Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Glaeal wrote:
    I made up a bunch of crap. Real names, fake phone numbers and addresses. but then again, my security clearance was for a military job, might be a little easier for me than for w/e it is you are doing.
    Quid, don't do this.

    Just don't.
    Yeah, it's probably a federal crime. Very possibly perjury.

    Thanatos on
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    MishraMishra Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    I made up a bunch of crap. Real names, fake phone numbers and addresses. but then again, my security clearance was for a military job, might be a little easier for me than for w/e it is you are doing.
    ^ This here, This is how not to do it. Never make anything up because you never know when it'll bite you in the ass. If you don't know, just say you don't know. I didn't remeber the name of my boss at the job I had in a barnes and Noble cafe 7 Years ago. It's not a big deal. Also as a courtesy let the folks who you put down know you're putting them down. Even with prior warning one of my bosses was pretty freaked out when the G-men showed up to interview him.

    Mishra on
    "Give a man a fire, he's warm for the night. Set a man on fire he's warm for the rest of his life."
    -Terry Pratchett
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    mcdermottmcdermott Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Thanatos wrote:
    Glaeal wrote:
    I made up a bunch of crap. Real names, fake phone numbers and addresses. but then again, my security clearance was for a military job, might be a little easier for me than for w/e it is you are doing.
    Quid, don't do this.

    Just don't.
    Yeah, it's probably a federal crime. Very possibly perjury.
    It is a crime, but I'm pretty sure it's not perjury. It says right on the form what crime it is and what the penalties are (10 years max in prison, IIRC). So yeah, no.

    The forms says "to the best of your knowledge." You are not expected to know everything. If you give them ballpark dates, it will not matter as long as they're close.

    As opposed to fake phone numbers and addresses, you could always go with "last known" phone numbers and addresses...just make sure you annotate them as such, so they know they're going to have to do a little searching.

    Seriously, this isn't a test. It's just a form to make the investigators' jobs easier when they go to dig up the dirt on your ass. They will not deny your clearance because you can't remember the phone number of the Burger King you worked at when you were 17, or what month you moved from Nutsack Rd. to Whogivesafuck Rd.

    mcdermott on
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    CephalicCarnageCephalicCarnage Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    in my defense, it was literally impossible for me to put down what they wanted. i never lived anywhere for more than a couple years, and they wanted non family members, who knew you for at least 7 years and all this other crap. i got names of people who i only knew for a couple years, and put an address where they might have lived, and phone numbers they might have had. people move, change thier numbers, it would not be suprising that the information was wrong lol.

    CephalicCarnage on
    We are not evil because of the evil things we do, we do evil because we ARE evil.
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    3lwap03lwap0 Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Quid wrote:
    So I'm going to be changing to a new job but it's going to require a high security clearance. I have nothing to hide, but for the questionaire I'll need to know where I lived, worked, and who I worked for over the last ten years, none of which I've really kept track of. I've seen various sites that offer personal information for a price, which I don't mind paying if it works, but I'd like to know if anyone has experience with which ones do. Otherwise it's going to be a long slog trying to get in touch with people who might still have this info.


    Alright, I’m going to explain everything about a security clearance to you. It can get kind of confusing, and hopefully, whatever person who is processing your clearance can be of some help as well. I do not personally process security clearances, but part of my training requires me to have an intimate knowledge of everything involved in obtaining one, on top of having a security clearance of my own and gone through the process twice.

    Since you are going back ten years, you are going for a TS clearance. First, the good news: There isn’t any really. It’s not going to be much fun. No one enjoys being under a microscope, but it’s part of the gig, so suck it up. The bad news: You’re going to pretty much have to grab your ankles on a TS clearance. Be prepared for tough questions, and/or a polygraph test if you work in certain areas.

    I’ll describe the hardest parts to you:

    1) Your security officer will contact you, and tell you that you need to visit the E-QIP site, located at http://www.opm.gov/e-qip/. You have 30 days to open your investigation, by logging into the site and supplying the information it asks for (SSN, DoB, City you born in, etc.,).

    2) After that initial log in, you have sixty days to complete your SF-86 (Security Clearance Request Form). If you didn’t wait 30 days to log in initially, any spare days are added to that sixty. My suggestion: Don’t dick around. Get on it, because it can take a while to dig up the information that the SF-86 asks for.

    3) Now the fun part. The SF-86 is broken into sections, with the first ones very easy. Who you are, personal information, who your parents are, where do you currently live, etc., Easy peasy. The hard part comes after section 6 and 7: Employment history and places of residence. You will need to back 10 years, and list every address you’ve lived at, PLUS who can vouch that you lived there. That can be a real pain in the ass, since if you’ve lived in a lot of places, and weren’t very social, it can be a crap shoot. You may have to use the landlord, who can at least pull up information that you lived/rented at said place (if your old neighbors aren’t still living there). On top of that, you need to list their addresses and contact information. They will be contacted for sure.

    4) The other fun part: Employment history: List all the jobs, their addresses, and where you’ve worked for the past 10 years (or until you were 17, whichever happens first). In my case, I was an IT contractor prior to my new employers, and worked for a lot of companies. Fourteen companies in sever years to be exact. To describe the pain in the ass that was, words honestly fail me. It sucked, but I had to do it. They government wants to know the following: Where did you work, who was your supervisor and what is their contact information, and who other than your supervisor can vouch for you working there, and what is their contact information. MPORTANT: Be sure and list any periods of unemployment. Keep your dates accurate – if you weren’t working and on the dole, SAY SO.

    Once you’re done with all that, the rest is really pretty easy comparatively. The part where everyone gets nervous is drug use, and credit history. One question will ask: Have you used any controlled substances in the past seven years? If you answer yes, be exact. If you’ve done a LOT of drugs, your security officer will ask you to sign a drug waiver, asking the adjudicator to wave that blemish away, since you are being honest about it. Don’t fucking like here. If you do, they will find out and nail you to the fucking wall.

    As for credit history, if you are delinquent on any accounts, you’ll need to list the account #’s, who the lender is, and how many days are you over-do. In my case, I had a defaulted student loan – getting my clearance was the kick in the ass to square my loan away, and get back in the banks good graces. If you tell your interviewer up front you’re working to clear your debt that is generally good enough (as long as you’re being honest about it). You’ll get some other bullshit questions: Have you ever plotted to overthrow the government, are you a terrorist, blah blah blah.

    You’ll also be asked to give three references: Use good friends – they’ll get interviewed. Your neighbors will get interviewed. Your CO, and NCO’s will be interviewed. Remember, above all, the investigator wants to evaluate your trustworthiness. If you are upfront and honest about everything, things go much easier on you. But be warned: Investigators are tabloid reporters. If there is dirt to find, they’ll find it. Be honest and upfront about the smallest thing during your subject interview.

    Once the investigation is done, your clearance will be submitted to a CAF, or Central Adjudication Facility. There it begins a long, long wait on someone’s desk. Once an adjudicator gets his/her hands on it, they’ll go over everything, and do one of three things. They’ll approve it, deny it, or send it back for more information. If you are denied, you can appeal it with the CAF. You’ll go to a triumvirate kind of hearing, where you state your case (or send a letter, etc.,). The going rate on a TS clearance these days is about 12-18 months, but it could take longer if you associate with foreign nationals, do a lot of International travels, or have been a nomad your entire life. The long part is really the adjudication. Investigations only take about 3-4 months usually. You can be issued an interim clearance in about a month or so, if you don’t have anything huge hanging over you. And interim is good for 24 months.

    And I think that’s about it. I may have left some stuff out, but if I do, I’ll be sure and post it.


    tl;dr – A TS clearance is not fun to get. Be exact as possible, because it sucks if you fuck up.

    3lwap0 on
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    MishraMishra Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    in my defense, it was literally impossible for me to put down what they wanted. i never lived anywhere for more than a couple years, and they wanted non family members, who knew you for at least 7 years and all this other crap. i got names of people who i only knew for a couple years, and put an address where they might have lived, and phone numbers they might have had. people move, change thier numbers, it would not be suprising that the information was wrong lol.

    And yet you never tried calling those number's, or writing those address to look for fowarding addresses? You got lucky, this was a bad move.

    Mishra on
    "Give a man a fire, he's warm for the night. Set a man on fire he's warm for the rest of his life."
    -Terry Pratchett
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    CephalicCarnageCephalicCarnage Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    actually it was just for secret. and i already have the clearance, and have had it for about 10 months.

    CephalicCarnage on
    We are not evil because of the evil things we do, we do evil because we ARE evil.
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    3lwap03lwap0 Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Mishra wrote:
    in my defense, it was literally impossible for me to put down what they wanted. i never lived anywhere for more than a couple years, and they wanted non family members, who knew you for at least 7 years and all this other crap. i got names of people who i only knew for a couple years, and put an address where they might have lived, and phone numbers they might have had. people move, change thier numbers, it would not be suprising that the information was wrong lol.

    And yet you never tried calling those number's, or writing those address to look for fowarding addresses? You got lucky, this was a bad move.

    For a Secret clearance, they don't really look that hard. So long as you have a clean record, havn't done drugs, or whatever, you're okay. No investigator goes door to door on a Secret. Just about anyone can get a Secret, even if you have bad credit or a prior drug use (and tell them). Of course, if you lie and get caught though, it's very much your ass. I have one guy right now being grilled over his secret, and they're sweating him pretty hard right now.

    3lwap0 on
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    MishraMishra Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    "3lwap0 wrote:
    Good stuff

    The times are getting better. if you do your homework and are up to date you can get it pretty fast, mine took only 9 months. The key is when the investigator shows up to interview you be sure you've got a list of changes from when you submitted the SF-86. Again anyone whose moved, things like that. At the bare minimum they like cell phone numbers because at least then they can call the person to find out where they are.

    Mishra on
    "Give a man a fire, he's warm for the night. Set a man on fire he's warm for the rest of his life."
    -Terry Pratchett
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    PheezerPheezer Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited December 2006
    in my defense, it was literally impossible for me to put down what they wanted. i never lived anywhere for more than a couple years, and they wanted non family members, who knew you for at least 7 years and all this other crap. i got names of people who i only knew for a couple years, and put an address where they might have lived, and phone numbers they might have had. people move, change thier numbers, it would not be suprising that the information was wrong lol.

    Great, and it's still terrible advice that anyone who'd read the form would know was advice that might get someone up to 10 years in a military prison if they followed it.

    You're gonna spend some time off the forum now.

    Pheezer on
    IT'S GOT ME REACHING IN MY POCKET IT'S GOT ME FORKING OVER CASH
    CUZ THERE'S SOMETHING IN THE MIDDLE AND IT'S GIVING ME A RASH
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