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Mentally handicapped friend seeking job

MagicToasterMagicToaster JapanRegistered User regular
edited August 2009 in Help / Advice Forum
I have a friend who is mentally handicapped. I'm not exactly sure what kind of condition he has, but he's 25 though his mind is like a 15 year old's. Just like a very immature 15 year old. He told me that he would really like to get a job, so I told him I'd help. I know some employers hire handicapped people to do certain types of work, but so far all I can think of is fry-cook and super market.

I'm having a really tough time thinking of what other jobs he could do where he would have little responsibility. Can any of you help?

MagicToaster on

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    TopiaTopia Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    This is tough. My step-brother is the same way, but he is 23. Pretty much any job you would give to a teenager 14-16 is the way to go. Restaurant (dishwasher, busser, ect) is a really good place to look, my step-brother was a dishwasher/prep-cook and really enjoyed it, and I actually think it helped his maturity. He would get frustrated about the job sometimes, more so than most people would, but after some support and encouragement he got over it and "grew-up" (for lack of a better term).

    Sadly there isn't much they can do at that mental age but any job is a good idea. I wouldn't recommend something where he deals with people a lot, as the unaccepting people of our society will be a bit taken back when a man of his age may be of lower mental ability, and the wrong interaction could really damage him.

    PS. this advice is made based on an assumption of what he would be like, you would have to read what I wrote and see if the things I implied fit in your situation

    Topia on
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    MagicToasterMagicToaster JapanRegistered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Actually, they do fit. How did you go about motivating your brother when he got frustrated with the job? I'm pretty sure it will happen to him too.

    MagicToaster on
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    TopiaTopia Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Well it's likely to differ slightly in your situation so it's best I use anecdotal evidence.

    While he was doing prep-work (a few weeks after starting) he was told he was doing something in an improper manner. And he is one who believes a few weeks of work is 100% training, and that by now he is top tier worker their. I simply sat down with him and talked about how people methods differ, and that his co-workers (boss maybe? it was a while ago) were just trying to help him improve at work and suggesting he do things a different way. I also was fairly firm in telling him that he was not the boss (being nice doesn't always work) and that he should suck it up and listen to them, as it will make things easier for him. This seemed to work as he didn't have many problems after this (when he did have problems, the same advice was used, he also had mild FAS so he was forgetful).

    Basically what you have to make sure to do yourself is not lead him to think that he is right to be angry (even in the slightest) as this may lead to him going back to work and exaggerating the conversation he had with you and saying that his way was the right way, for example. It is also important that you are FIRM with him. He trusts you more than other people, and your stern attitude is more likely to connect with him than other people, and often the mentally challenged do not take suggestions well (as per my example above, the suggestion his co-workers made was deemed "wrong" by my brother). Although your brother may be different and require a child-like tone, you say he is more around the mental age of 15 so I doubt this is the case.

    If this didn't help you at all, I'll mull over the things I said to him and try to think of a more appropriate way to express how I motivated and encouraged my brother. This is a pretty hashed answer, but it's the best I can think of at the moment.

    I'm sure if you take a look back into conversations and confrontations you've had with your brother you will be able to analyze them and determine the things that work best with him, to make him understand different things, and to help him through predicaments.

    Topia on
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    oncelingonceling Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Both the shipping docks and warehouse furniture companies here provide fair employment for a couple of people I know with precisely the same description of ability.

    onceling on
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    DixonDixon Screwed...possibly doomed CanadaRegistered User regular
    edited August 2009
    I know that mcdonalds hires people who are mentally handicapped. At the one near my house there is a fella who is handicapped and works there. He seems to really enjoy it and I always say hi to him

    Dixon on
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    matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    There are job placement services for people with disabilities, I work in a bakery and we've recently hired a high-functioning autistic guy, he's 22, through a service like that. They help with things like resumes and interviews, and finding appropriate jobs. Call your local Department of Social Services, chances are they'll be able to point you in the right direction. The placement service should be free, also.

    matt has a problem on
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    Cptn PantsCptn Pants Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Dixon wrote: »
    I know that mcdonalds hires people who are mentally handicapped. At the one near my house there is a fella who is handicapped and works there. He seems to really enjoy it and I always say hi to him

    Agree'd there is Burger King right by my job and there is a mentally handicapped man there, he's an assistant manager to boot... He really seems to enjoy his work, he's always smiling and chatting up the other workers. And, I'm sure being an assistant manager really booster his self esteem.

    Cptn Pants on
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    RiemannLivesRiemannLives Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    There are job placement services for people with disabilities, I work in a bakery and we've recently hired a high-functioning autistic guy, he's 22, through a service like that. They help with things like resumes and interviews, and finding appropriate jobs. Call your local Department of Social Services, chances are they'll be able to point you in the right direction. The placement service should be free, also.

    Indeed. My mother used to work for one of those back in the mid 90s. These really are the best way to go. For people capable of it, they would get them normal jobs that were their speed. For those not able to work alone they would get a crew together and usually get them jobs doing yard work as a team with a hired on team leader.

    I spent one summer during high school working with them actually. The crews would rake leaves and such and I (and a couple others) would do any jobs too dangerous for them like running weedwackers.

    RiemannLives on
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    Dunadan019Dunadan019 Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    The federal government is required to be an equal opportunity hirer. this means that janitors and cleaning staff at tech labs are often people with less than full capabilities. its a VERY nice job for someone looking for a stable opportunity.

    Dunadan019 on
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    ShadowfireShadowfire Vermont, in the middle of nowhereRegistered User regular
    edited August 2009
    There are job placement services for people with disabilities, I work in a bakery and we've recently hired a high-functioning autistic guy, he's 22, through a service like that. They help with things like resumes and interviews, and finding appropriate jobs. Call your local Department of Social Services, chances are they'll be able to point you in the right direction. The placement service should be free, also.

    This. We have a kid who pushes carts a couple days a week through one of these services. They tend to be very helpful, sending agents out with the person for as long as they need the assistance. :^:

    Shadowfire on
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    TopiaTopia Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Dunadan019 wrote: »
    janitors and cleaning staff

    limed for great ideas.

    Topia on
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    Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Major East CoastRegistered User regular
    edited August 2009
    My base uses a company called "Goodwill" for our janitorial service. They seem to employ a number of challenged folks.

    Incidentally, they do a goddamn awesome job. Really seem to take pride in their job. Not something I see in janitors typically.

    Iceman.USAF on
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    Omnicron9999Omnicron9999 Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    My base uses a company called "Goodwill" for our janitorial service. They seem to employ a number of challenged folks.

    Incidentally, they do a goddamn awesome job. Really seem to take pride in their job. Not something I see in janitors typically.

    Goodwill is actually really awesome for this type of thing. They help people of varying abilities get work, and will provide training for some pretty marketable skills(computers, etc).

    I would get in touch with your local Goodwill, and see what they can help set him up with.

    Omnicron9999 on
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    ShogunShogun Hair long; money long; me and broke wizards we don't get along Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Go to a pizza place and get him a job folding boxes. Knew a very cheerful fellow who did this at a Domino's I worked at a couple years back. He enjoyed his job plus the food, and the drivers/insiders loved him because they didn't have to fold boxes.

    Shogun on
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    WezoinWezoin Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Another place to look is libraries. I help with a handicapped baseball team and the girl I help works as a page (putting books away, etc)

    Wezoin on
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    defreakdefreak Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    movie theaters, I live in the Austin area, and it's like they reserve these positions for mentally or physically impaired people, 30-40% of the people I encounter that tear the tickets are impaired in some way.

    defreak on
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    MagicToasterMagicToaster JapanRegistered User regular
    edited August 2009
    Thanks for the ideas guys! I'm gonna get cracking on this!

    MagicToaster on
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    Brodo FagginsBrodo Faggins Registered User regular
    edited August 2009
    I used to work at CVS, and we had a challenged guy, in his late 50s who had exactly what you described, and had the mentality of a 13 or 14 year old. He was really sweet, and he basically did things that didn't involve money (register, basically), like sweeping, cleaning, restocking, and returning go-backs.

    Brodo Faggins on
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