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New SSD Questions

MetallikatMetallikat Registered User regular
So, my current 1TB Western Digital Black drive is starting to have performance issues, so I've decided to take the SSD plunge. Getting the Intel 160gb SSD drive for OS and games, and a new 1TB Western Digital drive for storage, as well as a copy of Windows 7 (I'm still on Vista). Anything I should know about setting up Windows 7 on a new SSD? In particular, does Windows 7 know to enable TRIM support, or is that something I'll have to do manually once I get into things?

Metallikat on

Posts

  • DelzhandDelzhand Hard to miss. Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I too am thinking about getting my first SSD, though I'm a bit on the lower end of the budget spectrum. I'm trying to stay at or around $200, which probably limits me to the 80GB range, but since that's the size of my laptop's current drive and I have a 180 GB external I'm not worried about space as much.

    I was considering this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820167028
    or this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227529

    Any recommendations?

    Edit: Also, I'm not trying to hijack the thread, but I don't know if we need multiple SSD threads, and I couldn't find the new Computer Build thread

    Delzhand on
    Steam|FFXIV|Switch SW-3472-4893-0802
  • MetallikatMetallikat Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Nah, don't worry about hijacking. I've heard only good things about the Intel SSD's, which is why I decided on one of those.

    Metallikat on
  • CabezoneCabezone Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    The Vertex 2 is a real good line. There's no special setup needed for Windows 7.

    Cabezone on
  • CormacCormac Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    The Vertex 2's have reviewed very well, but I'd probably spend a little bit more money and get the 120gb version. The price seems to vary on a weekly basis, but there's always some kind of rebate on Newegg bringing it down the somewhere between $180 and $220.

    I was going to replace what I thought was a dying boot drive with the 120gb, but I switched the SATA cable, ran some diagnostics tests, and everything seems to be back to normal.

    Cormac on
    Steam: Gridlynk | PSN: Gridlynk | FFXIV: Jarvellis Mika
  • MuridenMuriden Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    What stats should one be considering when looking at a SSD?

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233108

    Looks to be ok for my $/capacity ratio. I just have no idea how to rate what is and isn't a good drive.
    The only stats I can see are:
    Sequential Access - Read: up to 270MB/s
    Sequential Access - Write: up to 130MB/s
    But I don't know what's a decent average to compare to.

    Muriden on
    MrGulio.332 - Lover of fine Cheeses. Replays
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  • CormacCormac Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Look for one that uses SandForce, and if your motherboard supports if SATA 6gb/s.

    Cormac on
    Steam: Gridlynk | PSN: Gridlynk | FFXIV: Jarvellis Mika
  • MuridenMuriden Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Cormac wrote: »
    Look for one that uses SandForce, and if your motherboard supports if SATA 6gb/s.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131604

    It would appear my mobo only has 3gb/s slots. What would that mean if I were to get a SSD? I would assume there would still be a noticeable difference compared to a normal 7200 RPM drive, just not are large compared to the faster SATA bus.

    Muriden on
    MrGulio.332 - Lover of fine Cheeses. Replays
    301787-1.png
  • CormacCormac Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Basically yes. Programs will open faster, cold booting into Windows should be way faster, but I'm not sure if games actually load any faster. Someone who actually owns a SSD would be better qualified than me to comment on how noticeable the differences are. I'm just going on what I read in reviews when picking out what I was going to buying before I got my hard drive working again. That said, everything I read said upgrading to an SSD is one of the best and most noticeable upgrades you can buy. If you have the money to spend and have another hard drive to save you music, pictures, videos, etc to you can't go wrong getting yourself an SSD.

    Cormac on
    Steam: Gridlynk | PSN: Gridlynk | FFXIV: Jarvellis Mika
  • Baron DirigibleBaron Dirigible Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I have an SSD installed in my 13" MBP, which only has 3Gb/s SATA. There's a dramatic improvement over my previous 5400RPM drive — more improvement, I suspect, than a 7200RPM would have over 5400RPM. From everything I've read, most SSDs aren't yet saturating 3Gb/s, and 6Gb/s would be overkill.

    If you can justify the higher price per Gb, an SSD is absolutely worth it and you certainly won't miss out from not having a 6Gb/s SATA connection. It might be less future-proof, but let's face it, SSDs are still very much a niche market and you'll be buying performance improvements that won't enter the mainstream for a number of years. I wouldn't worry too much about depreciation just yet!

    (I will acknowledge that once SSD adoption takes off, I expect prices to plummet rapidly and performance to increase more rapidly as well. It's still worth investing now.)

    Baron Dirigible on
    Perfection is achieved not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
  • KrizKriz Registered User
    edited February 2011
    I have an OCZ Vertex 2 in my i7 system and I'll never go back to a hard drive for booting the OS.

    If your drive supports TRIM, and you have Windows 7, that whole business is automated. Windows even turns off file indexing by itself. There's no need to muck about with your page file or other crazy tweaks no matter what paranoid posts you read on tech forums, since with all the recent optimizations, the life of a current generation Intel or OCZ SSD is fairly comparable to a normal HDD.

    should you get an SSD make sure to install it in AHCI mode, so you get the best possible performance. it's easy enough, just select it in your BIOS before you run the Windows installer. And with a terrabyte hard drive connected, it's no big deal to tell Windows to back up your junk if you feel so inclined.

    join us in the future.

    Kriz on
  • AeytherAeyther Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I am currently using 2 SSD's that I got on sale with one HDD, one SSD for a boot disc and another one for WoW, I don't think I could go back very easily if I wanted to. The boot times, programs loading, and WoW loading times are much faster.

    This is what I have set up:

    OCZ Vertex 2 50GB for Windows 7 64bit.

    OCZ Vertex 2 60GB for WoW.

    Decent HDD for installing programs onto and for the users folder.

    WD 1.5 TB External HDD for backup.

    I pretty much used the instructions off of here as a guide. It requires making changes to the Windows Registry though, but I did it on a clean install so I really didn't have much to lose.

    Aeyther on
    Switch: SW-4524-7761-8898 | ACNH Town: Bluenorth | SE MC Server | Steam
  • krapst78krapst78 Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Muriden wrote: »
    Cormac wrote: »
    Look for one that uses SandForce, and if your motherboard supports if SATA 6gb/s.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131604

    It would appear my mobo only has 3gb/s slots. What would that mean if I were to get a SSD? I would assume there would still be a noticeable difference compared to a normal 7200 RPM drive, just not are large compared to the faster SATA bus.

    You will not see any difference moving up to SATA III (6Gb/s) connection unless you purchase a Crucial RealSSD C300 (which have a small price premium) or a SandForce2500 based SSD (which are not out in retail yet). All the other current gen SSD can't even max out SATA II so you won't be losing any performance just utilizing the 3Gb/s slots.

    You should be aware that there is currently an issue with brand new OCZ Vertex 2 SSDs under 180GB. OCZ is offering a replacement program for people affected by the issue, but it's something you should consider.

    If you're willing to do a little more research, Storagereview is probably the best site for benchmarks on SSDs. They have a 'leaderboard' page that gives their current recommendations.

    http://www.storagereview.com/best_drives

    I currently have 3 different SSDs, a 120 GB G.Skill Phoenix Pro (Sandforce 1200) in my main desktop, 80GB Intel X-25M G2 and 64GB Supertalent Ultradrive GX (Indilinx controller) in my secondary computer, and in most subjective areas, I can't really tell the difference between the three. There is DEFINITELY a difference when comparing any of the SSDs to a normal 7200 RPM HDD. I have a similarly specced HTPC using a typical Western Digital Blue 7200 rpm drive and my other computers using an SSD boot up almost twice as fast.

    krapst78 on
    Hello! My name is Inigo Montoya! You killed my father prepare to die!
  • MetallikatMetallikat Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Aeyther wrote: »
    I am currently using 2 SSD's that I got on sale with one HDD, one SSD for a boot disc and another one for WoW, I don't think I could go back very easily if I wanted to. The boot times, programs loading, and WoW loading times are much faster.

    This is what I have set up:

    OCZ Vertex 2 50GB for Windows 7 64bit.

    OCZ Vertex 2 60GB for WoW.

    Decent HDD for installing programs onto and for the users folder.

    WD 1.5 TB External HDD for backup.

    I pretty much used the instructions off of here as a guide. It requires making changes to the Windows Registry though, but I did it on a clean install so I really didn't have much to lose.

    Hrmm, gonna try that registry thing when I install my SSD. Just checked my Users folder out of curiosity to see how big it is.... yeah, definitely trying out those instructions.

    Metallikat on
  • EasilyAmusedEasilyAmused Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Cormac wrote: »
    Basically yes. Programs will open faster, cold booting into Windows should be way faster, but I'm not sure if games actually load any faster. Someone who actually owns a SSD would be better qualified than me to comment on how noticeable the differences are.

    I can`t imagine an SSD not being a noticable improvement. I upgraded to one of the hybrid drives (small flash memory cache and 7200rpm drive) and games loaded a lot faster. A SSD should be faster yet, though a lot more expensive for the capacity. If anyone is running a notebook with only 1 drive bay, a hybrid is a nice compromise for increased performance with larger capacity.

    EasilyAmused on
  • DelzhandDelzhand Hard to miss. Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Hmm. I hadn't thought of a hybrid drive. I'm using a laptop with just 1 drive bay. StorageReview has good things to say about the Seagate Momentus XT, maybe I'll get one of those.

    Delzhand on
    Steam|FFXIV|Switch SW-3472-4893-0802
  • krapst78krapst78 Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Yeah, the hybrid drives are great if you need the capacity but you still want quick loading on your main apps. I also have a Seagate Momentus XT (4Gb SSD/320GB 7200 drive) in my thin and light notebook and loading into Windows 7 is almost as quick as any of my SSDs. The only problem with the Momentus XT is that they have an known issue when used as the main drive in a Macbook, however Seagate has acknowledged the issue and is said to be working on a fix. Honestly, running an SSD or Hybrid is probably the most worthwhile upgrade you can do to your computer for general purpose use.

    krapst78 on
    Hello! My name is Inigo Montoya! You killed my father prepare to die!
  • ScudMuffinScudMuffin MarylandRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I have a Vertex 2 and love it. And yes, Win7 knows what to do. If you can, make a custom install disk of Win7 to keep the size down. Move the paging file to the HDD and turn off hibernation to save space on the SSD. I got my Win7 x64 install down to 3.2GB.

    ScudMuffin on
    XBL: Scud FTW
    PSN: ScudMuffin
  • AeytherAeyther Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Metallikat wrote: »
    Aeyther wrote: »
    I am currently using 2 SSD's that I got on sale with one HDD, one SSD for a boot disc and another one for WoW, I don't think I could go back very easily if I wanted to. The boot times, programs loading, and WoW loading times are much faster.

    This is what I have set up:

    OCZ Vertex 2 50GB for Windows 7 64bit.

    OCZ Vertex 2 60GB for WoW.

    Decent HDD for installing programs onto and for the users folder.

    WD 1.5 TB External HDD for backup.

    I pretty much used the instructions off of here as a guide. It requires making changes to the Windows Registry though, but I did it on a clean install so I really didn't have much to lose.

    Hrmm, gonna try that registry thing when I install my SSD. Just checked my Users folder out of curiosity to see how big it is.... yeah, definitely trying out those instructions.

    Yeah, the users folder can get quite large. Plus if you're constantly adding/deleting things it will wear out the SSD a lot faster than just putting all that stuff on a HDD.

    Aeyther on
    Switch: SW-4524-7761-8898 | ACNH Town: Bluenorth | SE MC Server | Steam
  • MetallikatMetallikat Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Aeyther wrote: »
    Metallikat wrote: »
    Aeyther wrote: »
    I am currently using 2 SSD's that I got on sale with one HDD, one SSD for a boot disc and another one for WoW, I don't think I could go back very easily if I wanted to. The boot times, programs loading, and WoW loading times are much faster.

    This is what I have set up:

    OCZ Vertex 2 50GB for Windows 7 64bit.

    OCZ Vertex 2 60GB for WoW.

    Decent HDD for installing programs onto and for the users folder.

    WD 1.5 TB External HDD for backup.

    I pretty much used the instructions off of here as a guide. It requires making changes to the Windows Registry though, but I did it on a clean install so I really didn't have much to lose.

    Hrmm, gonna try that registry thing when I install my SSD. Just checked my Users folder out of curiosity to see how big it is.... yeah, definitely trying out those instructions.

    Yeah, the users folder can get quite large. Plus if you're constantly adding/deleting things it will wear out the SSD a lot faster than just putting all that stuff on a HDD.

    I was looking around, and found this post. Seems less complicated than editing the registry with the same effect.

    EDIT: Also, doesn't Intel say something to the effect of their SSD's having a 5 year lifespan at something like 50 GB/day? I find it hard to believe I'd wear it out before it came time to upgrade.

    Metallikat on
  • MetallikatMetallikat Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    So, the SSD installation went well (although I found out I didn't have quite enough sata connectors, and had to disconnect one of my DVD drives). The speed difference is enormous in the OS performance, as well as the load times on games I have installed to it. Was a little nervous about installing Steam to my SSD, due to the large library of games I have, but looking around I found the Steam Tool. Makes keeping the SSD from getting filled up and still be able to play my Steam games easy.

    Metallikat on
  • CabezoneCabezone Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    If you're like most gamers and upgrade components at least every 5 years or so, you don't really need to worry about modern SSD drives wearing out.

    Cabezone on
  • MetallikatMetallikat Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Cabezone wrote: »
    If you're like most gamers and upgrade components at least every 5 years or so, you don't really need to worry about modern SSD drives wearing out.

    I figured as much. You hear some guys on internet forums talking about the extreme lengths they go to in order to remove their SSD from the equation as much as possible from their PC's operation so as not to "wear it out". They act like if you breath on it funny it'll cut the lifespan in half.

    Metallikat on
  • kaliyamakaliyama Left to find less-moderated fora Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Cormac wrote: »
    Basically yes. Programs will open faster, cold booting into Windows should be way faster, but I'm not sure if games actually load any faster. Someone who actually owns a SSD would be better qualified than me to comment on how noticeable the differences are.

    I can`t imagine an SSD not being a noticable improvement. I upgraded to one of the hybrid drives (small flash memory cache and 7200rpm drive) and games loaded a lot faster. A SSD should be faster yet, though a lot more expensive for the capacity. If anyone is running a notebook with only 1 drive bay, a hybrid is a nice compromise for increased performance with larger capacity.

    I think I would be a lot more skeptical if not for having bought a Macbook Air. The SSD has been the biggest user experience increase i've experienced since going from DOS to Win 95.

    kaliyama on
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  • Iceman.USAFIceman.USAF Major East CoastRegistered User regular
    edited February 2011
    krapst78 wrote: »
    Muriden wrote: »
    Cormac wrote: »
    Look for one that uses SandForce, and if your motherboard supports if SATA 6gb/s.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131604

    It would appear my mobo only has 3gb/s slots. What would that mean if I were to get a SSD? I would assume there would still be a noticeable difference compared to a normal 7200 RPM drive, just not are large compared to the faster SATA bus.

    You will not see any difference moving up to SATA III (6Gb/s) connection unless you purchase a Crucial RealSSD C300 (which have a small price premium) or a SandForce2500 based SSD (which are not out in retail yet). All the other current gen SSD can't even max out SATA II so you won't be losing any performance just utilizing the 3Gb/s slots.

    I just got a 128gb C300. It's freaking awesome. And it's only a 3/gbps port, so I can imagine it'll be amazing once I get a mainboard that supports 6.0gbps.

    Iceman.USAF on


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