Our new Indie Games subforum is now open for business in G&T. Go and check it out, you might land a code for a free game. If you're developing an indie game and want to post about it, follow these directions. If you don't, he'll break your legs! Hahaha! Seriously though.
Our rules have been updated and given their own forum. Go and look at them! They are nice, and there may be new ones that you didn't know about! Hooray for rules! Hooray for The System! Hooray for Conforming!

GOP: Internet Forum Is Liberal Echo Chamber

145791062

Posts

  • NerdgasmicNerdgasmic __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    SyphonBlue wrote: »
    Nerdgasmic wrote: »
    kedinik wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    It all boils down to your own deep and intense personal cowardice in the face of taxes.

    Taxes boil down to your ability to morally justify seizing someone else's property and spending it to your own benefit. I would be more thoughtful about how I threw the word cowardice around if I were you.

    You've never benefited from the collection and spending of taxes? Where do you live?

    In a land where he makes all of his own food and paves all of his own roads and makes all his own electricity.

    You don't mean-


    The Gulch?!


    I want every ill-gotten and misspent tax dollar we've got working towards finding this man.


    I have you now, Galt.

    @nealcm @faynor
    nerdgasmic.gif1420 6068 6113 - XBL Atomoclassic
  • Captain CarrotCaptain Carrot P'burg, MTRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    SyphonBlue wrote: »
    Nerdgasmic wrote: »
    kedinik wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    It all boils down to your own deep and intense personal cowardice in the face of taxes.

    Taxes boil down to your ability to morally justify seizing someone else's property and spending it to your own benefit. I would be more thoughtful about how I threw the word cowardice around if I were you.

    You've never benefited from the collection and spending of taxes? Where do you live?

    In a land where he makes all of his own food and paves all of his own roads and makes all his own electricity.

    Ah, Somalia.

    Spoiler:
  • ArdeArde Registered User
    edited May 2009
    SyphonBlue wrote: »
    Nerdgasmic wrote: »
    kedinik wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    It all boils down to your own deep and intense personal cowardice in the face of taxes.

    Taxes boil down to your ability to morally justify seizing someone else's property and spending it to your own benefit. I would be more thoughtful about how I threw the word cowardice around if I were you.

    You've never benefited from the collection and spending of taxes? Where do you live?

    In a land where he makes all of his own food and paves all of his own roads and makes all his own electricity.

    Ah, Somalia.
    Does he have cholera?

    Wii code:3004 5525 7274 3361
    XBL Gametag: mailarde

    Screen Digest LOL3RZZ
  • SyphonBlueSyphonBlue Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    SyphonBlue wrote: »
    Nerdgasmic wrote: »
    kedinik wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    It all boils down to your own deep and intense personal cowardice in the face of taxes.

    Taxes boil down to your ability to morally justify seizing someone else's property and spending it to your own benefit. I would be more thoughtful about how I threw the word cowardice around if I were you.

    You've never benefited from the collection and spending of taxes? Where do you live?

    In a land where he makes all of his own food and paves all of his own roads and makes all his own electricity.

    Ah, Somalia.

    Truly, it is the Garden of Eden.

    metroid_sig.jpg
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    Arde wrote: »
    SyphonBlue wrote: »
    Nerdgasmic wrote: »
    kedinik wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    It all boils down to your own deep and intense personal cowardice in the face of taxes.

    Taxes boil down to your ability to morally justify seizing someone else's property and spending it to your own benefit. I would be more thoughtful about how I threw the word cowardice around if I were you.

    You've never benefited from the collection and spending of taxes? Where do you live?

    In a land where he makes all of his own food and paves all of his own roads and makes all his own electricity.

    Ah, Somalia.
    Does he have cholera?

    Is the Space-Rand reptilian?

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    The rest of you, I fucking hate you for the fact that I now have a blue dot on this god awful thread.
  • HonkHonk Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    SyphonBlue wrote: »
    SyphonBlue wrote: »
    Nerdgasmic wrote: »
    kedinik wrote: »
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    It all boils down to your own deep and intense personal cowardice in the face of taxes.

    Taxes boil down to your ability to morally justify seizing someone else's property and spending it to your own benefit. I would be more thoughtful about how I threw the word cowardice around if I were you.

    You've never benefited from the collection and spending of taxes? Where do you live?

    In a land where he makes all of his own food and paves all of his own roads and makes all his own electricity.

    Ah, Somalia.

    Truly, it is the Garden of Eden.

    I'm thinking it's actually Brickwall-land. Because,
    Hi I am a brick wall! My cognitive functions are limited to that of several bricks with some cement in-between. I dislike taxes 'cus WRAGLWAAAAAAAARGL!

  • KevinNashKevinNash Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Jacobkosh wrote: »

    The really sad thing is that I don't believe for a second that you actually think such a group would be as or more effective. It all boils down to your own deep and intense personal cowardice in the face of taxes.

    You have a habit of oversimplifying just about everything. Taxes are one aspect, but it's not just a lump sum of spending if that spending may be beneficial. It can be an argument of how the money is used. The FDA can also control and suppress what we can and can not put into our bodies. It encourages lobbying to occur and the approval process is hardly unbiased. Should their reach go beyond just drugs and foods and into the realm of vitamins and supplements too?

    What we need is a watchdog. What we don't need is a taxpayer funded monopoly that is influenced by special interests.

  • MrMisterMrMister Valuing scholarship above all elseRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    kedinik wrote: »
    Taxes boil down to your ability to morally justify seizing someone else's property and spending it to your own benefit. I would be more thoughtful about how I threw the word cowardice around if I were you.

    There are two distinct libertarian motivations: one is the conviction that the free market will do everything better without intervention; the other is the conviction that although government intervention may be beneficial on the whole, it still amounts to a morally impermissible form of coercion. You can believe one but not the other, or, as you appear to, both.

    Unfortunately, the idea that taxation is morally impermissible coercion is retarded and I can only offhand think of one well-regarded academic who has written in defense of the idea. Robert Nozick, for the folks at home. Just about everyone else in ethics seems to come down on the other side of the issue.

    So, how about that Steele character?

  • DuffelDuffel Registered User
    edited May 2009
    KevinNash wrote: »
    You have a habit of oversimplifying just about everything. Taxes are one aspect, but it's not just a lump sum of spending if that spending may be beneficial. It can be an argument of how the money is used. The FDA can also control and suppress what we can and can not put into our bodies. It encourages lobbying to occur and the approval process is hardly unbiased. Should their reach go beyond just drugs and foods and into the realm of vitamins and supplements too?

    What we need is a watchdog. What we don't need is a taxpayer funded monopoly that is influenced by special interests.
    What's stopping this presumably privately-operated "watchdog" from being just as corrupt and influenced by special interests?

    Hell, what's stopping the people/companies the watchdog needs to be watching from setting up just such a group as a rubber stamp since they're the ones with the money and the motivation to do so?

  • QuidQuid The Fifth Horseman Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    You know what Libertarians having a poor grasp of reality isn't related to? Steele possibly resigning.

  • SyphonBlueSyphonBlue Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Duffel wrote: »
    KevinNash wrote: »
    You have a habit of oversimplifying just about everything. Taxes are one aspect, but it's not just a lump sum of spending if that spending may be beneficial. It can be an argument of how the money is used. The FDA can also control and suppress what we can and can not put into our bodies. It encourages lobbying to occur and the approval process is hardly unbiased. Should their reach go beyond just drugs and foods and into the realm of vitamins and supplements too?

    What we need is a watchdog. What we don't need is a taxpayer funded monopoly that is influenced by special interests.
    What's stopping this presumably privately-operated "watchdog" from being just as corrupt and influenced by special interests?

    Hell, what's stopping the people/companies the watchdog needs to be watching from setting up just such a group as a rubber stamp since they're the ones with the money and the motivation to do so?

    Because the free market is 100% perfect and good. Duh.

    metroid_sig.jpg
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Duffel wrote: »
    KevinNash wrote: »
    You have a habit of oversimplifying just about everything. Taxes are one aspect, but it's not just a lump sum of spending if that spending may be beneficial. It can be an argument of how the money is used. The FDA can also control and suppress what we can and can not put into our bodies. It encourages lobbying to occur and the approval process is hardly unbiased. Should their reach go beyond just drugs and foods and into the realm of vitamins and supplements too?

    What we need is a watchdog. What we don't need is a taxpayer funded monopoly that is influenced by special interests.
    What's stopping this presumably privately-operated "watchdog" from being just as corrupt and influenced by special interests?

    Hell, what's stopping the people/companies the watchdog needs to be watching from setting up just such a group as a rubber stamp since they're the ones with the money and the motivation to do so?
    The government.

    Oh, wait...

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. On Hiatus!

    Any gamers in the Danville, PA area? PM me if you're interested in some tabletop gaming.
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Quid wrote: »
    You know what Libertarians having a poor grasp of reality isn't related to? Steele possibly resigning.
    If he can successfully court them, though, it might be tangentially related to him keeping his job.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. On Hiatus!

    Any gamers in the Danville, PA area? PM me if you're interested in some tabletop gaming.
  • kedinikkedinik Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Scalfin wrote: »

    Defend that the USDA and FDA are even useful, regardless of how much money we waste on them, when tragedies like this still inevitably slip through the cracks.
    Nerdgasmic wrote:
    You've never benefited from the collection and spending of taxes? Where do you live?

    I recognize that public goods can exist and that society as a whole can experience a net benefit from government programs.

    Notwithstanding that, it costs so much money just to do the research to plan public programs correctly that we usually blunder into them ineffectually, often causing too much or too little of a good to be produced relative to the true cost society must bear when it creates and maintains near-permanent, ineffective bureaucracies that have little incentive to do their job and every incentive to fight each other for pork spending.

    The burden of proof ought to be on politicians to show that a given program is publicly necessary AND that we are capable of tackling the situation effectively; rarely are either of these conditions even addressed.

  • MrMisterMrMister Valuing scholarship above all elseRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    KevinNash wrote: »
    What we need is a watchdog. What we don't need is a taxpayer funded monopoly that is influenced by special interests.

    If the market will inevitably create such a watchdog, then why didn't it? We got the FDA because of public outrage over ongoing contamination and health risks. Wiki:
    Wiki wrote:
    By the 1930s, muckraking journalists, consumer protection organizations, and federal regulators began mounting a campaign for stronger regulatory authority by publicizing a list of injurious products which had been ruled permissible under the 1906 law, including radioactive beverages, cosmetics which caused blindness, and worthless "cures" for diabetes and tuberculosis. The resulting proposed law was unable to get through the Congress of the United States for five years, but was rapidly enacted into law following the public outcry over the 1937 Elixir Sulfanilamide tragedy, in which over 100 people died after using a drug formulated with a toxic, untested solvent.

    If you think that the market can prevent that sort of thing now, then you'd have to explain what the salient differences are between now and then.

  • SyphonBlueSyphonBlue Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    kedinik wrote: »
    Scalfin wrote: »

    Defend that the USDA and FDA are even useful, regardless of how much money we waste on them, when tragedies like this still inevitably slip through the cracks.

    Because Bush deregulated the FDA and made them virtually powerless! The peanut butter outbreak was his last free market gift to the American people before he walked out the door! Fuck

    metroid_sig.jpg
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    kedinik wrote: »
    Scalfin wrote: »

    Defend that the USDA and FDA are even useful, regardless of how much money we waste on them, when tragedies like this still inevitably slip through the cracks.
    For the same reason it's worth funding the CIA and NSA when things like 9/11 inevitably slip through.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. On Hiatus!

    Any gamers in the Danville, PA area? PM me if you're interested in some tabletop gaming.
  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    Duffel wrote: »
    KevinNash wrote: »
    You have a habit of oversimplifying just about everything. Taxes are one aspect, but it's not just a lump sum of spending if that spending may be beneficial. It can be an argument of how the money is used. The FDA can also control and suppress what we can and can not put into our bodies. It encourages lobbying to occur and the approval process is hardly unbiased. Should their reach go beyond just drugs and foods and into the realm of vitamins and supplements too?

    What we need is a watchdog. What we don't need is a taxpayer funded monopoly that is influenced by special interests.
    What's stopping this presumably privately-operated "watchdog" from being just as corrupt and influenced by special interests?

    Hell, what's stopping the people/companies the watchdog needs to be watching from setting up just such a group as a rubber stamp since they're the ones with the money and the motivation to do so?

    Isn't that how half the "organic accreditation" companies work now? Hell, movie studios and other industries (which I can't for the life of me remember) get reviewed and endorsed by in-house outfits.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    The rest of you, I fucking hate you for the fact that I now have a blue dot on this god awful thread.
  • KevinNashKevinNash Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    Quid wrote: »
    You know what Libertarians having a poor grasp of reality isn't related to? Steele possibly resigning.
    If he can successfully court them, though, it might be tangentially related to him keeping his job.

    Steele is a neocon, he gets no love from the liberty community. He and the current incarnation of the GOP deserve each other.

  • NartwakNartwak Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Blaster wrote:
    gurp gorp FREE MARKET
    You're trying to make me piss myself laughing, right?

    *company knowingly sells tainted product for years*
    *FDA & CDC tracks large outbreak to company selling tainted product, shuts down plants and moves to criminally penalize them*
    *company decares bankruptcy in wake of shutdowns and recalls*


    Hur dur, looks like the free market found a way to me! *posts link to the PCA's website*

    Spoiler:
  • Eat it You Nasty Pig.Eat it You Nasty Pig. tell homeland security 'we are the bomb'Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Duffel wrote: »
    KevinNash wrote: »
    You have a habit of oversimplifying just about everything. Taxes are one aspect, but it's not just a lump sum of spending if that spending may be beneficial. It can be an argument of how the money is used. The FDA can also control and suppress what we can and can not put into our bodies. It encourages lobbying to occur and the approval process is hardly unbiased. Should their reach go beyond just drugs and foods and into the realm of vitamins and supplements too?

    What we need is a watchdog. What we don't need is a taxpayer funded monopoly that is influenced by special interests.
    What's stopping this presumably privately-operated "watchdog" from being just as corrupt and influenced by special interests?

    Hell, what's stopping the people/companies the watchdog needs to be watching from setting up just such a group as a rubber stamp since they're the ones with the money and the motivation to do so?

    See also: the nice folks who rate bonds.

    gkcmatch_zps97480250.jpg
    'let's all get high, from the income angle'
  • NerdgasmicNerdgasmic __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    Even if the average implemented program were enacted as carelessly as you claim, chances are decent that it's better than doing nothing. Some sort of consumer driven equivalent can't just "spring up", especially without the resources provided in taxes. And even ignoring or overcoming all of these problems, as has been pointed out before, what's to stop these great new consumer committees from falling prey to the same corruption?

    @nealcm @faynor
    nerdgasmic.gif1420 6068 6113 - XBL Atomoclassic
  • ClipseClipse Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    kedinik wrote: »
    Defend that the USDA and FDA are even useful, regardless of how much money we waste on them, when tragedies like this still inevitably slip through the cracks.

    Murders will inevitably happen, so let's go ahead and get rid of police as well. Foreign countries -- particularly adversaries -- will inevitably succeed in keeping at least a few secrets from our government, so abolish the NSA and CIA as well. Because obviously, if a government agency cannot do its job flawlessly for all eternity, it's worthless.

  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    KevinNash wrote: »
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    Quid wrote: »
    You know what Libertarians having a poor grasp of reality isn't related to? Steele possibly resigning.
    If he can successfully court them, though, it might be tangentially related to him keeping his job.

    Steele is a neocon, he gets no love from the liberty community. He and the current incarnation of the GOP deserve each other.
    I don't disagree.

    The thing is, his job is to rebuild the Republican coalition. Being able to do so means he can keep his job. Libertarians (capital L) may not be huge fans of his, but they're a better place to start than virtually anywhere else.

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. On Hiatus!

    Any gamers in the Danville, PA area? PM me if you're interested in some tabletop gaming.
  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited May 2009
    KevinNash wrote: »
    You have a habit of oversimplifying just about everything.

    You give it to me presimplified, dude, in the form of pie-in-the-sky imaginary private organizations that you never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever describe in any detail how they would work or where their coercive authority would come from. Give me a detailed, cited position paper about Magic Regulatory Non-Government Body That Keeps People From Dying and I will happily give you the meaty body blows you crave.
    The FDA can also control and suppress what we can and can not put into our bodies. It encourages lobbying to occur and the approval process is hardly unbiased. Should their reach go beyond just drugs and foods and into the realm of vitamins and supplements too?

    What we need is a watchdog. What we don't need is a taxpayer funded monopoly that is influenced by special interests.

    This all sounds like an argument for greater transparency rather than an entirely different scheme altogether. Look, this isn't like buying a lemontastic car or a crappy DVD player. If you put e coli or carcinogens in your body you're already fucked, so it makes sense to put our focus on lengthy pre-release testing and on-site inspection rather than hoping that the threat of class-action lawsuits after the fact will keep companies honest on their own.

    (Incidentally, we already know that doesn't work, since with criminal and civil liability at stake companies still make the conscious choice to harm their consumers - what on earth makes you think a private agency or the threat of suits will be sufficient on their own?)

    EDIT: this will be my last post on the subject. We now return to <3 SLUM LOVE <3 , already in progress.

  • SyphonBlueSyphonBlue Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Clipse wrote: »
    kedinik wrote: »
    Defend that the USDA and FDA are even useful, regardless of how much money we waste on them, when tragedies like this still inevitably slip through the cracks.

    Murders will inevitably happen, so let's go ahead and get rid of police as well. Foreign countries -- particularly adversaries -- will inevitably succeed in keeping at least a few secrets from our government, so abolish the NSA and CIA as well. Because obviously, if a government agency cannot do its job flawlessly for all eternity, it's worthless.

    Wars, too. Those will inevitably happen, so let's abolish the military and rely solely on private militias.

    Oh wait, I forgot, the military is the only thing taxes are allowed to pay for!

    metroid_sig.jpg
  • HonkHonk Registered User, __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    This thread will probably be locked if it doesn't get back on track soon.

    I would approve of this heartily, because when libertarianism becomes the topic I hate that the government guarantees freedom of speech to everyone.

  • ScalfinScalfin __BANNED USERS regular
    edited May 2009
    OptimusZed wrote: »
    kedinik wrote: »
    Scalfin wrote: »

    Defend that the USDA and FDA are even useful, regardless of how much money we waste on them, when tragedies like this still inevitably slip through the cracks.
    For the same reason it's worth funding the CIA and NSA when things like 9/11 inevitably slip through.

    He also ignored my edit pointing out that it was the government that figured out that it was that plant's products that were causing the sickness, so the company couldn't have done anything without the government.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    The rest of you, I fucking hate you for the fact that I now have a blue dot on this god awful thread.
  • Captain CarrotCaptain Carrot P'burg, MTRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    At this point, I'm not sure that Steele can do much of anything to rebuild the coalition, if there's much to be done. Elected officials may be able to, if they figure out what to do and how to do it, but most of them seem to be more interested in saying "No!" right now. Steele began as a dubious figure with little power, and now he's a laughingstock.

    Spoiler:
  • NartwakNartwak Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Blaster wrote:
    Defend that the USDA and FDA are even useful, regardless of how much money we waste on them, when tragedies like this still inevitably slip through the cracks.
    Yeah, when an organization is understaffed and underfunded to the point it no longer performs it's functions that clearly point to the need for it to be dissolved. *nods sagaciously*

    Spoiler:
  • Captain CarrotCaptain Carrot P'burg, MTRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Honk wrote: »
    This thread will probably be locked if it doesn't get back on track soon.
    Hey, how about somebody start a thread on "libertarianism lol" and let this thread stay "steele lol" (ostensibly). Please. At the very least stop feeding KevinNash and kedinick.

    Spoiler:
  • SyphonBlueSyphonBlue Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    At this point, I'm not sure that Steele can do much of anything to rebuild the coalition, if there's much to be done. Elected officials may be able to, if they figure out what to do and how to do it, but most of them seem to be more interested in saying "No!" right now. Steele began as a dubious figure with little power, and now he's a laughingstock.

    If there was anyone who could help pull the Republican party out of its mess right now, Steele isn't it.

    metroid_sig.jpg
  • DuffelDuffel Registered User
    edited May 2009
    I think Steele was probably doomed from the moment they made him do the whole "extremely exxagerated so-called hip-hop image" thing. You don't want the fresh new face of your party and "clown" to be common associations and when you start saying things like "bling bling in the stimulus package" you can't expect much else.

    Granted I think that particular comment was from Bachmann, not Steele, but it's a pretty good illustration of the type of dismally ignorant strategy they've been playing with for the last few months.

  • Captain CarrotCaptain Carrot P'burg, MTRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I don't think they made him do that. Can you really see that idea coming from someone like Eric Cantor or Haley Barbour? Seems to be all Steele to me.

    Spoiler:
  • ArdeArde Registered User
    edited May 2009
    I don't think they made him do that. Can you really see that idea coming from someone like Eric Cantor or Haley Barbour? Seems to be all Steele to me.

    I don't know - they all seem like buffons to me.
    I guess there is perhaps a degree or level of buffon-ness each one of them holds, but a buffon's as buffonish as a buffon will be a buffon.

    Great. ToTP.

    Wii code:3004 5525 7274 3361
    XBL Gametag: mailarde

    Screen Digest LOL3RZZ
  • Captain CarrotCaptain Carrot P'burg, MTRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    At first I read that as 'button' and was very confused.

    Spoiler:
  • OptimusZedOptimusZed Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I don't think they made him do that. Can you really see that idea coming from someone like Eric Cantor or Haley Barbour? Seems to be all Steele to me.

    Run GOP?

    We're reading Rifts. You should too. You know you want to. On Hiatus!

    Any gamers in the Danville, PA area? PM me if you're interested in some tabletop gaming.
  • JacobkoshJacobkosh Gamble a stamp. I can show you how to be a real man!Super Moderator, Moderator mod
    edited May 2009
    Here's the way I look at it, if you all are willing to indulge some speculative psychology: in the GOP, bottom-up change like what happened with the Democratic Party just isn't feasible, because what you find among GOP supporters are a great number of people who to some degree are psychologically reliant on top-down diktat and tradition. Look at the reverence among the faithful for traditional authority figures: police, soldiers, preachers, even coaches are taken very seriously and conversely there is a sense of shock and betrayal when an individual from one of those institutions expresses an unorthodox position. There was that study done in the 50s showing that people who identified as "liberal" tended to be more adaptable - finding a new route around a traffic jam, etc. - while "conservatives" were much more likely to sit through the jam and grouse about it. In practical terms, we can see this in action in, for instance, the revulsion with which Huckabee (EDIT: and Ron Paul) was treated in 2008, or the crap McCain took in 2000 for running against the anointed one.

    So I just don't see the GOP reinventing itself from the bottom up - the libertarians could, but they're a minority and they could just as easily bolt. The avenue I see for the party is some authoritative, charismatic figure - someone from private industry or possibly the military, with deep pockets and no prior political experience - emerging and sort of stepping forward and pulling the sword from the stone. If the move was bold and audacious enough I can honestly see the party falling into line behind them.

  • Captain CarrotCaptain Carrot P'burg, MTRegistered User regular
    edited May 2009
    Jacobkosh wrote: »
    So I just don't see the GOP reinventing itself from the bottom up - the libertarians could, but they're a minority and they could just as easily bolt. The avenue I see for the party is some authoritative, charismatic figure - someone from private industry or possibly the military, with deep pockets and no prior political experience - emerging and sort of stepping forward and pulling the sword from the stone. If the move was bold and audacious enough I can honestly see the party falling into line behind them.
    Colin Powell almost fits that role, except his image has been fairly tarnished by the WMD debacle, and Rush hates him. And really, Rush's hatred could be an asset if he did it right. However, the first bit does make him more or less ineligible for this role.

    Spoiler:
  • FencingsaxFencingsax Registered User regular
    edited May 2009
    I don't think they made him do that. Can you really see that idea coming from someone like Eric Cantor or Haley Barbour? Seems to be all Steele to me.
    On the other hand, he sounds like a white dude trying to sound "street" or "urban" or whatever euphemism they want to use when they mean "black"

    It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it
145791062
This discussion has been closed.