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The Greatest Country on Earth!

ZimmydoomZimmydoom Registered User
edited January 2007 in Debate and/or Discourse
This is a thread about America. Or, rather, this is a thread about how America (the country) and Americans (the people) are perceived around the world, and how foreign media influences these perceptions.

Before I went to Japan my Japanese history teacher, a German, warned me that if I got any flack while I was over there it would probably be from Europeans who were also studying abroad. I was prepared for this, so I kept my guard up around them, but I tried to be my natural self with my Japanese friends. The funny thing was, while I was not discriminated against intentionally, I was constantly having to deal with the most ridiculous stigmas about American men and Japanese women, and just general stupidity. "How you know how to use cell phone?" "Don't you drive big SUV?" "Don't you know American men rape Japanese girls?" (As if Japanese men don't already have that covered.)

It was a weird year, to say the least, and I constantly found myself having to explain to both Japanese and other international students that, no, not all Americans think alike, we didn't all vote for Bush, we're not all Protestants, I've never even touched a gun, and not all black people are in the Army (I have no fucking clue where that one came from). This is not to say that your average American actually knows diddly fuck about life outside his own tri-county area, but these were students at the international school of one of the four most prestigious universities in Japan.

The common thread among all these misconceptions seemed to be that my foreign friends were convinced that the American press was at least partially owned and operated by the Government, just like in their country. My roommate this past semester was from Hong Kong, and he refused to believe that it was even legal to criticize George Bush until he saw the Daily Show ("Oh my God, are they allowed to say that? Won't he go to jail now?"). Watching TV news in Japan and reading their daily papers (English translation...) I was always floored at how America was framed as this colossal, monolithic bully full of stupid, inbred white rednecks and black drug dealers (apparently there are no Hispanics in the US, by the way).

Anyway, I know there are quite a few people from around the world who post on these forums, and I'm really curious as to how you think the media in your country influences popular perception about the US, and how that jives with your own personal experiences. Also, for Americans who have lived abroad, what were your experiences with negative stereotypes? How did you handle it?

EDIT: Upon further consideration, feel free to share experiences about otherwise intelligent Americans had some kind of ridiculous misconception about you because you were from another country. (Legit complaints only, though. No one cares if Bucky-Jim from Kentucky didn't know your traditional Slavic clog-hat dance of friendship and misogyny.)

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Zimmydoom on
«13456711

Posts

  • TankHammerTankHammer Atlanta Ghostbuster Atlanta, GARegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    This is why I don't go along with all the Anti-Amerikanizm out there. People in general are stupid and love to believe in the inferiority of others. Every nation in the world has it's faults, America is just the center of the bulls-eye that everyone aims for.

    Sure, this country is far from perfect and does a lot of stupid and/or shady things, but anything that groups a whole people together is going to be ignorant by nature.

    I'm pretty surprised that they didn't think we could operate cell-phones though, I mean every moronic air-head American celebrity is always talking on them. If Paris Hilton can figure it out, anyone can.

    TankHammer on
  • Spilled Milk, Inc.Spilled Milk, Inc. Registered User
    edited December 2006
    Damn, that is hilarious.

    Spilled Milk, Inc. on
    Larry's my name, real estate's my game. Rape was another game of mine...
  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    People in general are stupid and love to believe in the inferiority of others.
    they sure do.

    redx on
    This machine kills threads.
  • YosemiteSamYosemiteSam Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    I thought this thread was going to be about Kazakhstan.

    Kazakhstan is the greatest
    Country in the world

    YosemiteSam on
    We are all very lucky to live in a world where there is this much music.
  • AroducAroduc regular
    edited December 2006
    I thought this thread was going to be about Kazakhstan.

    Kazakhstan is the greatest
    Country in the world

    Step off G. Unless you've misspelled French Guiana especially poorly.
    Edit: How embarrassing.

    Aroduc on
  • ElkiElki get busy Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited December 2006
    I thought this thread was going to be about Kazakhstan.

    Kazakhstan is the greatest
    Country in the world
    All other countries have inferior potassium.

    Elki on
    smCQ5WE.jpg
  • SamiSami Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Elkamil wrote:
    I thought this thread was going to be about Kazakhstan.

    Kazakhstan is the greatest
    Country in the world
    All other central asian countries have inferior potassium.

    Sami on
    Preacher wrote:
    That's the kicker, not only is our healthcare not cutting mustard we are overpaying for shitty healthcare. We have the olive garden of healthcare.
  • TachTach Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Before I went to France in October, I was told to expect the people there to be rude to me, especially when they found out I was American. But I never got that. Not once. In restaurants, they seemed to immediately know we were tourists, and spoke to us in english, even before we asked for a table.

    Out in the countryside, those who didn't speak english were very polite about it, and we actually had some humerous moments with them because of the language barrier.

    We did engage in an in-depth conversation with a world travelling woman who did our portrait. We did discuss some American traits and her visits to New York- we explained that it's different on the west coast and in between. She didn't have the hatred that most Americans assume foreigners have.

    Tach on
  • Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    a friend of mine from mainland china was confounded by the massive amount of bureaucracy she had to go through to get some relatively simple tings done. she's from a really wealthy family, and apparently they just bribe the hell out of anyone who gives them flack or slows them down.

    Loren Michael on
    2ezikn6.jpg
  • ElJeffeElJeffe Moderator, ClubPA mod
    edited December 2006
    Tach wrote:
    Before I went to France in October, I was told to expect the people there to be rude to me, especially when they found out I was American. But I never got that. Not once. In restaurants, they seemed to immediately know we were tourists, and spoke to us in english, even before we asked for a table.

    Out in the countryside, those who didn't speak english were very polite about it, and we actually had some humerous moments with them because of the language barrier.

    We did engage in an in-depth conversation with a world travelling woman who did our portrait. We did discuss some American traits and her visits to New York- we explained that it's different on the west coast and in between. She didn't have the hatred that most Americans assume foreigners have.

    I haven't traveled abroad, but the people I know who have generally think that Europeans tend to be fairly polite, if not overtly friendly. Most of the Europeans I've known who visited the states, though, were complete fuckwads. Not all, but most.

    ElJeffe on
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  • ÆthelredÆthelred Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    The mobile phone thing probably came because America lags behind in that field.

    Æthelred on
    pokes: 1505 8032 8399
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Tach wrote:
    Before I went to France in October, I was told to expect the people there to be rude to me, especially when they found out I was American. But I never got that. Not once. In restaurants, they seemed to immediately know we were tourists, and spoke to us in english, even before we asked for a table.

    Out in the countryside, those who didn't speak english were very polite about it, and we actually had some humerous moments with them because of the language barrier.

    We did engage in an in-depth conversation with a world travelling woman who did our portrait. We did discuss some American traits and her visits to New York- we explained that it's different on the west coast and in between. She didn't have the hatred that most Americans assume foreigners have.

    Spend much time in Paris? Its like the NYC of France, and I definitely ran into some complete asshole french parisians. I definitely went out of my way to talk to arabs when i needed help with directions or whatever.

    In general though, Europeans are very good people. I spent ten months living in Sweden and a few weeks traveling around the continent. 99% of the people i ran into were great.

    geckahn on
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    The mobile phone thing probably came because America lags behind in that field.

    fucking cdma. I just switched to verizon from cingular and i spent all day yesterday pissed off about it.

    geckahn on
  • SpeedySwafSpeedySwaf Registered User
    edited December 2006
    Zimmydoom wrote:
    The common thread among all these misconceptions seemed to be that my foreign friends were convinced that the American press was at least partially owned and operated by the Government, just like in their country. My roommate this past semester was from Hong Kong, and he refused to believe that it was even legal to criticize George Bush until he saw the Daily Show ("Oh my God, are they allowed to say that? Won't he go to jail now?").
    If at all possible, send him a vid of when Colbert was at that dinner with Bush in the same room.

    On that vein of criticizing the government, I heard somewhere that it was illegal to make fun of the government in Japan. Any truth to this?

    SpeedySwaf on
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  • Vincent GraysonVincent Grayson Frederick, MDRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    geckahn wrote:
    Tach wrote:
    Before I went to France in October, I was told to expect the people there to be rude to me, especially when they found out I was American. But I never got that. Not once. In restaurants, they seemed to immediately know we were tourists, and spoke to us in english, even before we asked for a table.

    Out in the countryside, those who didn't speak english were very polite about it, and we actually had some humerous moments with them because of the language barrier.

    We did engage in an in-depth conversation with a world travelling woman who did our portrait. We did discuss some American traits and her visits to New York- we explained that it's different on the west coast and in between. She didn't have the hatred that most Americans assume foreigners have.

    Spend much time in Paris? Its like the NYC of France, and I definitely ran into some complete asshole french parisians. I definitely went out of my way to talk to arabs when i needed help with directions or whatever.

    In general though, Europeans are very good people. I spent ten months living in Sweden and a few weeks traveling around the continent. 99% of the people i ran into were great.

    My sister said the people in Paris were largely total douchebags to her when she was out there, and she couldn't be more obviously American.

    Vincent Grayson on
  • ZimmydoomZimmydoom Registered User
    edited December 2006
    SpeedySwaf wrote:
    Zimmydoom wrote:
    The common thread among all these misconceptions seemed to be that my foreign friends were convinced that the American press was at least partially owned and operated by the Government, just like in their country. My roommate this past semester was from Hong Kong, and he refused to believe that it was even legal to criticize George Bush until he saw the Daily Show ("Oh my God, are they allowed to say that? Won't he go to jail now?").
    If at all possible, send him a vid of when Colbert was at that dinner with Bush in the same room.

    On that vein of criticizing the government, I heard somewhere that it was illegal to make fun of the government in Japan. Any truth to this?
    No, it's just a very very bad thing to do. The Japanese mainstream media is all about promoting harmony and uniformity, anything that disrupts the status quo is quickly silenced. Social pressure is king over there, the law is often secondary.

    In Japan's case, it's obvious why the focus is entirely on external forces as agents of change. Can't have Japanese responsible for fucking up the perfectly good Yamato race, after all. What shocked me was the fact that while many Japanese would grudgingly admit that the Japanese press is bullshit government propaganda, they were still shocked when they met foreigners who didn't fit into their preconceptions of what a proper gaijin should be.

    Ultimately, it's the media creation of the "foreign devil" in this age of information that I'm so curious about.

    Zimmydoom on
    Better-than-birthday-sig!
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    Zimmydoom, Zimmydoom
    Flew away in a balloon
    Had sex with polar bears
    While sitting in a reclining chair
    Now there are Zim-Bear hybrids
    Running around and clawing eyelids
    Watch out, a Zim-Bear is about to have sex with yooooooou!
  • redxredx I(x)=2(x)+1 whole numbersRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Germans are kind wierd. Like, the obey the law. Like, a whole lot. Fuckers don't even j-walk or cross when then little dealie says don't walk. Even if it is hella late and there aren't any cars about.

    Kinda came as a bit of a suprise, and I caught a bunch of dirty looks a couple times from big groups of people waiting at lights. Hell, they don't even do the herd behavior thing where if one person goes everyone else will follow. They just look at you like you're a douche, kinda.

    They also kinda suck at pull in parking.

    redx on
    This machine kills threads.
  • saggiosaggio Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Zimmydoom wrote:
    you think the media in your country influences popular perception about the US, and how that jives with your own personal experiences.

    In English Canada, I've always thought of the media in two camps when it comes to covering the US. There's the one that tends to show favour to US actions more often than not (the continentalists; I'm looking at you, Global and Bell). Most of the media groupings that tend to be continentalist also tend to have a Tory (red, blue, or otherwise) bias. The other grouping (CBC, chiefly) tend to take a more nationalist bent. Coverage, at least from my experience, is intentionally critical of the US (i.e., "how does action [x] affect Canada?", rather than "the U.S. committed action [x] today").

    Of course, within these two camps there is still a pro-Canadian focus (except for the fringe Alberta rags like the Western Standard who favour annexation), which inevitably leads to what most Americans would consider anti-Americanism. I find that part of the cultural ethos, especially for older Canadians, is that we are fundamentally distinct from America and Americans. The manifestation of that distinctiveness more often than not is a negative attitude towards American action in the world and Americans in general.

    For me, personally, my experiences in the US just reinforced the general disdain that most of my peers have for the US and Americans in general. I found that people were rather rude in general and went all funny whenever I mentioned I was Canadian. The amount of advertising that pervades absolutely everything you do, I found extremely jarring, as well as the horrible layout of your cities and lack of decent public transportation.

    I also found it quite disconcerting the militarist culture that seems to be tied inextricably to Americans' conception of 'patriotism' (which is just as jarring; flags everywhere, the anthem being sung and the pledge being recited at the drop of a hat). That was another aspect of things that I didn't enjoy at all.

    In all honesty, I have no desire to go to the US ever again. This isn't a knock on the people; my best friend is an American who has lived here for the past few years. It's just that the whole package there (militarism, lessened social conscious, lots and lots of advertising, rude people, far-right wing politics in the mainstream) makes me find it rather repulsive. Kind of like Alberta.

    saggio on
    3DS: 0232-9436-6893
  • YarYar Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Zimmydoom wrote:
    "Oh my God, are they allowed to say that? Won't he go to jail now?"
    This is the most common thing I hear from people from abroad, for as long as I can remember. They often are astounded how much we make fun of our leaders and how we can possibly function as a society while allowing it.

    A friend of mine spent some time in China, where her host family were a part of a pop culture (fairly common over there I understand) that loves any clothing with English writing. Sort of like how kanji is cool in certain circles here, except on a much broader scale.

    Anyway, the host Mom was beaming with pride over a tie-dyed "Tripping is Fun" t-shirt she was wearing in honor of the American guest. She insisted that my friend translate it for her. Not recognizing the immediate need for tact, she told her in her best Chinese possible, that it says, "LSD is a good thing." And the Mom burst into sobs of shame.

    Anyway, my experiences are more as a Georgian travelling domestically, where I am frequently asked about my expertise in pick-up trucks, hound dogs, and the most common: cross-burning.

    Yar on
  • CavilCavil Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Thais are just happy to have things foreign. When I was there, they delivered McDonalds. Yes, delivered. Apparently, the cost of delivery is actually less than the flat-rate cost of a Big Mac. Naturally, the food is still just as shitty as over here, but because it's American, they treat it like it's cuisine. They could easily get authentic Phad Thai or fried rice or beef noodles for just 50 cents a bowl, but foreign food is apparently a status symbol in that country. Seriously, they love this country a little too much.

    Cavil on
    Virtue finds and chooses the mean.
  • LondonBridgeLondonBridge __BANNED USERS
    edited December 2006
    Um... Texas is the greatest country in the world.

    LondonBridge on
  • FeralFeral MEMETICHARIZARD along with you if I get drunk well I know I'm gonna be gonna be the man whoRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Zimmydoom wrote:
    What shocked me was the fact that while many Japanese would grudgingly admit that the Japanese press is bullshit government propaganda, they were still shocked when they met foreigners who didn't fit into their preconceptions of what a proper gaijin should be.

    Perhaps the media message is a self-reinforcing symptom rather than a root cause of popular preconceptions, much like in the US.

    Feral on
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  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Tach wrote:
    Before I went to France in October, I was told to expect the people there to be rude to me, especially when they found out I was American. But I never got that. Not once. In restaurants, they seemed to immediately know we were tourists, and spoke to us in english, even before we asked for a table.

    Out in the countryside, those who didn't speak english were very polite about it, and we actually had some humerous moments with them because of the language barrier.

    We did engage in an in-depth conversation with a world travelling woman who did our portrait. We did discuss some American traits and her visits to New York- we explained that it's different on the west coast and in between. She didn't have the hatred that most Americans assume foreigners have.

    I haven't traveled abroad, but the people I know who have generally think that Europeans tend to be fairly polite, if not overtly friendly. Most of the Europeans I've known who visited the states, though, were complete fuckwads. Not all, but most.
    It's a tourist exchange program. Most of the Americans who go abroad are complete fuckwads, too.

    matt has a problem on
    nibXTE7.png
  • thorpethorpe Registered User
    edited December 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Zimmydoom wrote:
    you think the media in your country influences popular perception about the US, and how that jives with your own personal experiences.



    I also found it quite disconcerting the militarist culture that seems to be tied inextricably to Americans' conception of 'patriotism' (which is just as jarring; flags everywhere, the anthem being sung and the pledge being recited at the drop of a hat). That was another aspect of things that I didn't enjoy at all.

    Man what. Where did you go?

    thorpe on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • AzioAzio Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    saggio wrote:
    Coverage, at least from my experience, is intentionally critical of the US (i.e., "how does action [x] affect Canada?", rather than "the U.S. committed action [x] today").
    I don't think that's true. I think they're delivering an in-depth, local perspective just like any self-respecting journalist would. It's just that there's not a whole lot of nice things an intelligent person can say about any of the Bush Administration's policies.

    Azio on
  • SpazSpaz Registered User
    edited December 2006
    thorpe wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Zimmydoom wrote:
    you think the media in your country influences popular perception about the US, and how that jives with your own personal experiences.



    I also found it quite disconcerting the militarist culture that seems to be tied inextricably to Americans' conception of 'patriotism' (which is just as jarring; flags everywhere, the anthem being sung and the pledge being recited at the drop of a hat). That was another aspect of things that I didn't enjoy at all.

    Man what. Where did you go?
    This isn't exactly weird or anything. Watch some of that "patriotic" crap on TV sometime, closely. It's all soldiers with guns giving salutes and shit. While our society isn't completely focused on the military, it's certainly a strong point for a lot of patriotism.

    Spaz on
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  • NartwakNartwak Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Yes, let's all listen to the television.

    Nartwak on
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  • thorpethorpe Registered User
    edited December 2006
    Spaz wrote:
    thorpe wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Zimmydoom wrote:
    you think the media in your country influences popular perception about the US, and how that jives with your own personal experiences.



    I also found it quite disconcerting the militarist culture that seems to be tied inextricably to Americans' conception of 'patriotism' (which is just as jarring; flags everywhere, the anthem being sung and the pledge being recited at the drop of a hat). That was another aspect of things that I didn't enjoy at all.

    Man what. Where did you go?
    This isn't exactly weird or anything. Watch some of that "patriotic" crap on TV sometime, closely. It's all soldiers with guns giving salutes and shit. While our society isn't completely focused on the military, it's certainly a strong point for a lot of patriotism.

    Eh, I guess. Those National Guard recruitment ads at movie theatres are pretty fucking obnoxious and ridiculous.

    thorpe on
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  • Loren MichaelLoren Michael Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    thorpe wrote:
    Eh, I guess. Those National Guard recruitment ads at movie theatres are pretty fucking obnoxious and ridiculous.

    i fucking love the one where they guy fights a lava monster.

    Loren Michael on
    2ezikn6.jpg
  • ZimmydoomZimmydoom Registered User
    edited December 2006
    thorpe wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Zimmydoom wrote:
    you think the media in your country influences popular perception about the US, and how that jives with your own personal experiences.



    I also found it quite disconcerting the militarist culture that seems to be tied inextricably to Americans' conception of 'patriotism' (which is just as jarring; flags everywhere, the anthem being sung and the pledge being recited at the drop of a hat). That was another aspect of things that I didn't enjoy at all.

    Man what. Where did you go?

    This is always the first question I ask when someone tells me that they visited America. I go to school in Boston, but I was born to a French-Canadian family (my great-grandparents emigrated from Quebec) and grew up in rural Maine. I've spent a couple of weeks in South Carolina, and about six weeks total in DC over the years. I also spent a week with my born-again uncle in Riverside, CA before heading to Tokyo.

    By far the biggest shock to my foreign friends was that all Americans are not the same, that culture varies depending on where you go within the US. Patriotism in New England means something very different from patriotism in the southwest. We worship the founders not as war heroes, but as statesmen and philosophers.

    As for all our advertising, it's not nearly as bad as it is in Japan, trust me. We do have our limits.

    Zimmydoom on
    Better-than-birthday-sig!
    Gim wrote: »
    Zimmydoom, Zimmydoom
    Flew away in a balloon
    Had sex with polar bears
    While sitting in a reclining chair
    Now there are Zim-Bear hybrids
    Running around and clawing eyelids
    Watch out, a Zim-Bear is about to have sex with yooooooou!
  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray the swamp, always the swampRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    In general though, Europeans are very good people.

    It still baffles me how anyone can say anything about Europeans in general. For the record: Europe ranges from Portugal to Bulgary and from Sweden to Greece. Europe is vastly different from the United States, your country has the same currency all around, they all speak the same language, they all celebrate the same national holidays and every state is ruled in the same way.
    In Europe, there are roughly 20 currencies, every country has its own language, every country has different holidays, even the end of the WWI and WWII is celebrated on different days, some countries are ruled as a monarchy, others as a republic, others are still ran by dictators and then there's everything in between.

    Even from a historic point of view, Europe has never shown much unity, we have pretty much waged war from the beginning of time until now. (Balkan hi2u)

    Anyway, I first thought the media in the USA was pretty pro-gov, mostly because that is what I taught at school, I remember a documentary about FOX News as an example of media gone wrong, which pretty heavily influenced my opinion on US media. Of course, this was later rectified by seeing some of the Daily Show and visiting your country.

    At the moment, my opinion on your country is rather positive; I think your government sucks monkeyballs, but the people are fantastic. In fact, if I'll ever leave this country, I'll move to the US, just because I like the way people think.
    ...
    Just as long as I don't have to deal with the government, healthcare or law enforcement. :| Oh, and for Pete's sake: you should *really* learn more about the rest of the world in school. D:

    /0,02€

    Aldo on
  • HozHoz Cool Cat Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Spaz wrote:
    thorpe wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    I also found it quite disconcerting the militarist culture that seems to be tied inextricably to Americans' conception of 'patriotism' (which is just as jarring; flags everywhere, the anthem being sung and the pledge being recited at the drop of a hat). That was another aspect of things that I didn't enjoy at all.

    Man what. Where did you go?
    This isn't exactly weird or anything. Watch some of that "patriotic" crap on TV sometime, closely. It's all soldiers with guns giving salutes and shit. While our society isn't completely focused on the military, it's certainly a strong point for a lot of patriotism.
    People in the U.S. are allowed to practice their beliefs in more extreme measures than any other country I'm aware of. Shit, some people here believe burning our flag is just as patriotic as saluting it.

    Hoz on
  • ZimmydoomZimmydoom Registered User
    edited December 2006
    Hoz wrote:
    Spaz wrote:
    thorpe wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    I also found it quite disconcerting the militarist culture that seems to be tied inextricably to Americans' conception of 'patriotism' (which is just as jarring; flags everywhere, the anthem being sung and the pledge being recited at the drop of a hat). That was another aspect of things that I didn't enjoy at all.

    Man what. Where did you go?
    This isn't exactly weird or anything. Watch some of that "patriotic" crap on TV sometime, closely. It's all soldiers with guns giving salutes and shit. While our society isn't completely focused on the military, it's certainly a strong point for a lot of patriotism.
    People in the U.S. are allowed to go to practice their beliefs in more extreme measures than any other country I'm aware of. Shit, some people here believe burning our flag is just as patriotic as saluting it.
    :^:

    Zimmydoom on
    Better-than-birthday-sig!
    Gim wrote: »
    Zimmydoom, Zimmydoom
    Flew away in a balloon
    Had sex with polar bears
    While sitting in a reclining chair
    Now there are Zim-Bear hybrids
    Running around and clawing eyelids
    Watch out, a Zim-Bear is about to have sex with yooooooou!
  • GimGim a quietly erotic life Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Aldo wrote:
    In general though, Europeans are very good people.

    It still baffles me how anyone can say anything about Europeans in general. For the record: Europe ranges from Portugal to Bulgary and from Sweden to Greece. Europe is vastly different from the United States, your country has the same currency all around, they all speak the same language, they all celebrate the same national holidays and every state is ruled in the same way.
    In Europe, there are roughly 20 currencies, every country has its own language, every country has different holidays, even the end of the WWI and WWII is celebrated on different days, some countries are ruled as a monarchy, others as a republic, others are still ran by dictators and then there's everything in between.

    Even from a historic point of view, Europe has never shown much unity, we have pretty much waged war from the beginning of time until now. (Balkan hi2u)

    Anyway, I first thought the media in the USA was pretty pro-gov, mostly because that is what I taught at school, I remember a documentary about FOX News as an example of media gone wrong, which pretty heavily influenced my opinion on US media. Of course, this was later rectified by seeing some of the Daily Show and visiting your country.

    At the moment, my opinion on your country is rather positive; I think your government sucks monkeyballs, but the people are fantastic. In fact, if I'll ever leave this country, I'll move to the US, just because I like the way people think.
    ...
    Just as long as I don't have to deal with the government, healthcare or law enforcement. :| Oh, and for Pete's sake: you should *really* learn more about the rest of the world in school. D:

    /0,02€
    0.02 EUR = 0.0263936 USD

    Almost to 3 cents.

    Gim on
  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray the swamp, always the swampRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Gim wrote:
    Aldo wrote:
    In general though, Europeans are very good people.

    It still baffles me how anyone can say anything about Europeans in general. For the record: Europe ranges from Portugal to Bulgary and from Sweden to Greece. Europe is vastly different from the United States, your country has the same currency all around, they all speak the same language, they all celebrate the same national holidays and every state is ruled in the same way.
    In Europe, there are roughly 20 currencies, every country has its own language, every country has different holidays, even the end of the WWI and WWII is celebrated on different days, some countries are ruled as a monarchy, others as a republic, others are still ran by dictators and then there's everything in between.

    Even from a historic point of view, Europe has never shown much unity, we have pretty much waged war from the beginning of time until now. (Balkan hi2u)

    Anyway, I first thought the media in the USA was pretty pro-gov, mostly because that is what I taught at school, I remember a documentary about FOX News as an example of media gone wrong, which pretty heavily influenced my opinion on US media. Of course, this was later rectified by seeing some of the Daily Show and visiting your country.

    At the moment, my opinion on your country is rather positive; I think your government sucks monkeyballs, but the people are fantastic. In fact, if I'll ever leave this country, I'll move to the US, just because I like the way people think.
    ...
    Just as long as I don't have to deal with the government, healthcare or law enforcement. :| Oh, and for Pete's sake: you should *really* learn more about the rest of the world in school. D:

    /0,02€
    0.02 EUR = 0.0263936 USD

    Almost to 3 cents.
    Which can only mean one thing

    ...

    Opinions from Europe are worth more.

    Aldo on
  • SerpentSerpent Sometimes Vancouver, BC, sometimes Brisbane, QLDRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Azio wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Coverage, at least from my experience, is intentionally critical of the US (i.e., "how does action [x] affect Canada?", rather than "the U.S. committed action [x] today").
    I don't think that's true. I think they're delivering an in-depth, local perspective just like any self-respecting journalist would. It's just that there's not a whole lot of nice things an intelligent person can say about any of the Bush Administration's policies.

    I think it's very true. The media here always gives every story a canada focus. Like with the new moon base thing or something... headline was something like:

    "CANADA TO BE INVOLVED WITH MOONBASE"

    When I read the actual article, only in the very last paragraph was canada mentioned, and it was along the lines of something like this:
    "Canada may participate in the moonbase".

    Bias? hell yes.

    Serpent on
  • AldoAldo Hippo Hooray the swamp, always the swampRegistered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Serpent wrote:
    Azio wrote:
    saggio wrote:
    Coverage, at least from my experience, is intentionally critical of the US (i.e., "how does action [x] affect Canada?", rather than "the U.S. committed action [x] today").
    I don't think that's true. I think they're delivering an in-depth, local perspective just like any self-respecting journalist would. It's just that there's not a whole lot of nice things an intelligent person can say about any of the Bush Administration's policies.

    I think it's very true. The media here always gives every story a canada focus. Like with the new moon base thing or something... headline was something like:

    "CANADA TO BE INVOLVED WITH MOONBASE"

    When I read the actual article, only in the very last paragraph was canada mentioned, and it was along the lines of something like this:
    "Canada may participate in the moonbase".

    Bias? hell yes.
    A lot of countries have that, though.
    Just because Average Joe is only interested in what goes on in his own backyard. You've gotta keep things interesting for "the average man" and the average man just isn't interested in what they're doing down in Houston unless it's his tax money they're fooling around with.

    Aldo on
  • GimGim a quietly erotic life Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    32% more, yes.

    Gim on
  • matt has a problemmatt has a problem Points to 'off' Points to 'on'Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    Aldo wrote:
    Gim wrote:
    Aldo wrote:
    In general though, Europeans are very good people.

    It still baffles me how anyone can say anything about Europeans in general. For the record: Europe ranges from Portugal to Bulgary and from Sweden to Greece. Europe is vastly different from the United States, your country has the same currency all around, they all speak the same language, they all celebrate the same national holidays and every state is ruled in the same way.
    In Europe, there are roughly 20 currencies, every country has its own language, every country has different holidays, even the end of the WWI and WWII is celebrated on different days, some countries are ruled as a monarchy, others as a republic, others are still ran by dictators and then there's everything in between.

    Even from a historic point of view, Europe has never shown much unity, we have pretty much waged war from the beginning of time until now. (Balkan hi2u)

    Anyway, I first thought the media in the USA was pretty pro-gov, mostly because that is what I taught at school, I remember a documentary about FOX News as an example of media gone wrong, which pretty heavily influenced my opinion on US media. Of course, this was later rectified by seeing some of the Daily Show and visiting your country.

    At the moment, my opinion on your country is rather positive; I think your government sucks monkeyballs, but the people are fantastic. In fact, if I'll ever leave this country, I'll move to the US, just because I like the way people think.
    ...
    Just as long as I don't have to deal with the government, healthcare or law enforcement. :| Oh, and for Pete's sake: you should *really* learn more about the rest of the world in school. D:

    /0,02€
    0.02 EUR = 0.0263936 USD

    Almost to 3 cents.
    Which can only mean one thing

    ...

    Opinions from Europe are worth more.
    That, or like 3 pennies in your pocket instead of two, they're just more annoying.

    :wink:

    matt has a problem on
    nibXTE7.png
  • ComahawkComahawk Registered User regular
    edited December 2006
    ElJeffe wrote:
    Tach wrote:
    Before I went to France in October, I was told to expect the people there to be rude to me, especially when they found out I was American. But I never got that. Not once. In restaurants, they seemed to immediately know we were tourists, and spoke to us in english, even before we asked for a table.

    Out in the countryside, those who didn't speak english were very polite about it, and we actually had some humerous moments with them because of the language barrier.

    We did engage in an in-depth conversation with a world travelling woman who did our portrait. We did discuss some American traits and her visits to New York- we explained that it's different on the west coast and in between. She didn't have the hatred that most Americans assume foreigners have.

    I haven't traveled abroad, but the people I know who have generally think that Europeans tend to be fairly polite, if not overtly friendly. Most of the Europeans I've known who visited the states, though, were complete fuckwads. Not all, but most.

    Southern or Northern France?

    I'm Canadian and they immediately treated us with hostility in Northern France.

    Comahawk on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
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