the undeadmonkey sketchbook

undeadmonkeyundeadmonkey Registered User regular
edited January 2010 in Artist's Corner
Hey guys, first of all i'm happy to find a pretty good artforum here on PA! PA rocks!

anyways, i'm an art/gamedesign student at PHL Belgium and i'dd love to show you guys some of my works for come c&c.

enjoy!

Afbeelding7.png
here's a sketch i did for a friends d&d character. Somekind of nomad on a holy mission.

01KIPPEN.png
these chickens are for a schoolproject i'm working on.

Afbeelding3-2.png
Some 20min. sketches, i'm way to slow...

Afbeelding6-3.png
a 30min. sketch, again, i'm way to slow to actually finish something, still pretty happy with the result though.

thats it for now!
if you want to see more of my art you can visit: http://www.sanduuur.deviantart.com

undeadmonkey on

Posts

  • LoomdunLoomdun Registered User
    edited January 2010
    what the hell has it been with people trying to list how long it took to make something, it either looks good or not jesus

    Loomdun on
    splat
  • bombardierbombardier Moderator mod
    edited January 2010
    Loomdun wrote: »
    what the hell has it been with people trying to list how long it took to make something, it either looks good or not jesus

    What made you think that saying this is in any way helpful or constructive?

    bombardier on
  • LoomdunLoomdun Registered User
    edited January 2010
    bombardier wrote: »
    Loomdun wrote: »
    what the hell has it been with people trying to list how long it took to make something, it either looks good or not jesus

    What made you think that saying this is in any way helpful or constructive?

    Well as far as helpful goes with this, I would recommend more figuring out how much time it would actually take to make something you like rather then trying to rush as fast as possible in order to seem pro and coming in saying oh my gosh it was 20 minutes, and then if taking the time is literally taking you like 2 hours to just get the basic form right, then if your focus is to improving and not just doing fun doodles you should consider why your trying to create these things and what you should be studying to improve it.

    it wasn't him saying "is 20 minutes to little time on this" it was either him trying to say "oh gosh guys this took a whole 20 minutes i'm so amazing" or "oh jeeze my ADD cant span over 30 minutes"

    Loomdun on
    splat
  • MangoesMangoes Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    It's helpful to know how long someone took to create something. It gives you an idea of where they're at. For instance (and this is purely hypothetical and not in reference to the OP), if it took someone 7 hours of work to create a poorly constructed environment painting, we would know that he spent far too much time on the small things instead of working on lighting and composition. Same goes for a figure and its anatomy.

    It took him probably about 2 seconds to write how long it took him to create the piece of art. It's likely not something he put a whole lot of thought into. No need to read so deeply into it.

    Mangoes on
  • LoomdunLoomdun Registered User
    edited January 2010
    Regardless then it doesn't matter how much time they spent because someone could be caught up in detail no matter how much or little time is spent ughh strangling invisible people in air

    Loomdun on
    splat
  • winter_combat_knightwinter_combat_knight Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Treat your human character in the same way that you did the chickens. Your chickens are defined quite well (simple but still defined). Your humans are a little too sketchy. Maybe spend your 20 mins doing quick (but clean) block in gestures and body poses/shapes, and then spend 20 mins after that applying some concept ideas. While these are pretty cool ideas, they are just messy to look at. Like i said, 20 mins aint a long time, so just keep rolling!

    winter_combat_knight on
  • undeadmonkeyundeadmonkey Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Loomdun wrote: »
    bombardier wrote: »
    Loomdun wrote: »
    what the hell has it been with people trying to list how long it took to make something, it either looks good or not jesus

    What made you think that saying this is in any way helpful or constructive?

    Well as far as helpful goes with this, I would recommend more figuring out how much time it would actually take to make something you like rather then trying to rush as fast as possible in order to seem pro and coming in saying oh my gosh it was 20 minutes, and then if taking the time is literally taking you like 2 hours to just get the basic form right, then if your focus is to improving and not just doing fun doodles you should consider why your trying to create these things and what you should be studying to improve it.

    it wasn't him saying "is 20 minutes to little time on this" it was either him trying to say "oh gosh guys this took a whole 20 minutes i'm so amazing" or "oh jeeze my ADD cant span over 30 minutes"

    Fast-drawing is a way to train your eyes on working with shapes, lines and overall correct drawing. First impressions are the best most of the time.

    i'm not here to show off, i'm here for critique.

    are you an artist btw? if you are i would like to hear about your methods and techniques.

    undeadmonkey on
  • LoomdunLoomdun Registered User
    edited January 2010
    I use the Reilly abstraction, and fast drawing does nothing to train your eye with shapes, all fast drawing does is usually build up bad habits, if you want to learn how to work with shapes its usually better to make a sound structure and then analyze and redesign specific parts of the form.

    edit: Speed comes from understanding a form of procedure and efficiently performing it. To try to teach someone speed only is ludicrous.

    Loomdun on
    splat
  • undeadmonkeyundeadmonkey Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Treat your human character in the same way that you did the chickens. Your chickens are defined quite well (simple but still defined). Your humans are a little too sketchy. Maybe spend your 20 mins doing quick (but clean) block in gestures and body poses/shapes, and then spend 20 mins after that applying some concept ideas. While these are pretty cool ideas, they are just messy to look at. Like i said, 20 mins aint a long time, so just keep rolling!

    You are right, i have some real problems with actually finishing paintings. I get stuck at the sketchie look, but i'll try your pointers!

    cheers!

    undeadmonkey on
  • undeadmonkeyundeadmonkey Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Loomdun wrote: »
    Regardless then it doesn't matter how much time they spent because someone could be caught up in detail no matter how much or little time is spent ughh strangling invisible people in air

    i've seen your deviantart, quiet impressive!
    I think its really strange how you reacted! I had too do alot of model-drawing at school, and the teachers told us that the faster you get your basics of the drawing the better? When you have the basics you can spend more time on detail and finish a drawing in a shorter period of time (which really comes in handy when you're working with deadlines)

    undeadmonkey on
  • LoomdunLoomdun Registered User
    edited January 2010
    Thanks, That teacher either is a complete dumbass or you heard it incorrectly. Basic structure is the most important phase of a drawing if you cant get that right then you should not be moving on to detail because you'll be be working on something that is incorrect, whether it takes you 20 minutes or 4 hours, your main goal should always be getting the structure correct before playing around tone and colors

    with experience, your speed increases because you can visually measure better and build a sound structure in a shorter amount of time, ignoring this only builds bad habits.

    Loomdun on
    splat
  • undeadmonkeyundeadmonkey Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Loomdun wrote: »
    I use the Reilly abstraction, and fast drawing does nothing to train your eye with shapes, all fast drawing does is usually build up bad habits, if you want to learn how to work with shapes its usually better to make a sound structure and then analyze and redesign specific parts of the form.

    edit: Speed comes from understanding a form of procedure and efficiently performing it. To try to teach someone speed only is ludicrous.

    We'll offcourse, i use shapes and structures, i dont just go at it. And ok, i'm not as good, and i may not be working the right way, but i'm here for critique and help for that reason. I'm not learning anything by you just complaining on what i'm doing wrong.
    Anyway, thanks for actually explaining yourself. I'm still a noob on basic anatomy and i should do some more model-drawing classes. I hope i can find the time to do that this semester.

    undeadmonkey on
  • LoomdunLoomdun Registered User
    edited January 2010
    Model classes will definitely help you, but I kind of knew you were assuming speed was useful in that manner and getting you to bring it up wasn't going to be easy unless I kind of forced it out like throwing dynamite in a pond of fish zzz

    YOUR WELCOME BAI

    Loomdun on
    splat
  • undeadmonkeyundeadmonkey Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Loomdun wrote: »
    Model classes will definitely help you, but I kind of knew you were assuming speed was useful in that manner and getting you to bring it up wasn't going to be easy unless I kind of forced it out like throwing dynamite in a pond of fish zzz

    YOUR WELCOME BAI

    haha, thanks for the pointers
    cheers!

    undeadmonkey on
  • GodfatherGodfather Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Depends on what you're going for monkey.


    Structure is very important, and absolutely vital for any animator/concept artist.


    I do like how you're trying a lot of things all at once here; better to do that than to hesitate in any element of drawing. What you should focus on now is simplifying your construction, and I mean simple; box form figures with correct proportions.


    They are the basis of every imagination construction from the mind's eye, and the entire anatomy is built around this foundation. Once you get solid with the box forms, then you can move on to more advanced practice techniques, like extended gestures and geometric form analysis.

    Get those down and then throwing down your anatomy is a fucking cakewalk. The guy who teaches my anatomy class was/is a veteran Disney animator, as well as a powerhouse realist painter, and i've saved so much time, energy and effort over his methods that its astounding.


    Setting up a figure for realism and construction is actually very different; all depends on what you're going for here.

    Godfather on
  • beavotronbeavotron Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    hey undeadmonkey
    welcome to the ac, i'm sincerely sorry that you got such a rude welcome.

    i can see your teacher's point about the quick drawings as you're doing a course in game art
    for game concepting, it's pretty standard that in the pre-production stages, employers will ask for tons of small, quick, gritty thumbnails just to get ideas across...sort of like drawing brainstorming.
    so yes, speed is an issue in this very applied situation that you clearly stated you are working towards.

    that being said, of course doing figure studies will help you a lot in both this stage and subsequent development stages where more finalized, polished drawings are needed
    but your instructor is by no means a dumbass

    so welcome to the forums
    and i really love those chickens :)

    beavotron on
  • earthwormadamearthwormadam ancient crust Registered User regular
    edited January 2010
    Yeah speaker MC rooster is the man.

    earthwormadam on
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