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The [GNU/Linux] thread, where 'Windows' is always spelled properly.

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Posts

  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Mass Effect? On linux?

    Seeks on
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  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    MKR wrote: »
    32 bit is good up to 4 GB. If you don't have more than that, 64 bit won't do anything outside of some very narrow and unusual situations.

    You can also run a PAE kernel to get 32-bit to support up to 64GB of RAM. I believe Ubuntu Lucid 32-bit automatically uses the PAE kernel if you have 4GB or more of RAM. infinityOS and Fedora use it by default now.

    Running 64-bit Linux is too much hassle IMO. There are a lot of native games and game-like things that need 32-bit Linux to run.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Seeks wrote: »
    Mass Effect? On linux?

    Yep, I just (well, not JUST) finished playing ME2. Works just fine on Wine if you add a simple mouse hack. You'd be surprised, a lot of games I've tried run out of the box or with a NOCD crack. SupCom2, AvP3, ME2, Portal, Vampire:Bloodlines, blah blah blah.

    Mblackwell on
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  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Hmm.

    Unfortunately I bought a 4870, so even if I got these running comparable to how they would in Windows, it'd still just crash my system anyway.

    Seeks on
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  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Why would it crash your system? Doesn't sound like it should by any AppDB reports (and some people do have your card)...

    Edit: Oh, I just tried Fallout 3, which I couldn't get running on Ubuntu before, and now it magically works. I had to patch Wine to get any sounds other than voices, and there's no music, but wow.

    Mblackwell on
    Music: The Rejected Applications | Nintendo Network ID: Mblackwell

  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    I'll keep this short :P


    infinityOS 1.0 RC5 has been released to Sourceforge.

    Mostly bug fixes, though a few games and utilities have been added. infinityOS will be frozen with this release to prepare for 1.0. I'm hoping to release infinityOS 1.0 Marvin on May 24 (which coincidentally is my birthday :P).

    A list of changes is available here:
    https://launchpad.net/infinityos/1.0/1.0rc5

    Get it from:
    http://infinityos.net/

    darkphoenix22 on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    Seeks wrote: »
    Hmm.

    Unfortunately I bought a 4870, so even if I got these running comparable to how they would in Windows, it'd still just crash my system anyway.

    Stick with the open source Radeon drivers. The fglrx drivers aren't meant for desktop use.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    Mblackwell wrote: »
    Why would it crash your system? Doesn't sound like it should by any AppDB reports (and some people do have your card)...

    Edit: Oh, I just tried Fallout 3, which I couldn't get running on Ubuntu before, and now it magically works. I had to patch Wine to get any sounds other than voices, and there's no music, but wow.

    ATI and Wine don't exactly get along

    elliotw2 on
    camo_sig2.pngXBL:Elliotw3|PSN:elliotw2
  • Shorn Scrotum ManShorn Scrotum Man Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    So, I'm used to using Linux/Unix for things. I've played with Ubuntu a couple of times on home machines/virtual machines, and I use command line Unix (AIX) at work all the time as part of my duties as a Oracle DBA. Besides the fairly painless Ubuntu install I've never installed many Linux OS's, and I've never really played with the innards of the operating systems.

    I just downloaded ArchLinux to throw on a virtual machine. How much pain am I in for? :D

    Shorn Scrotum Man on
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  • SeeksSeeks Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Why would it crash your system? Doesn't sound like it should by any AppDB reports (and some people do have your card)...

    I should elaborate I guess, haha. The card overheats and hard crashes the entire system to prevent damage. It's a limitation of the hardware, not any software/firmware/etc. Happened in Windows pretty reliably. Never got more than 10 minutes into Mass Effect 1 or 2 before it would kill my system, no warning. Happened with a few other games, and once in linux (Nexuiz).

    I'm lamenting the 4870 specifically because on this forum alone I've seen posts by three or four other people with the same problem with this card. Maybe it was just a bad batch, but I'm pretty wary of ATI from this point on.

    Stick with the open source Radeon drivers. The fglrx drivers aren't meant for desktop use.

    I may try, but I always have terrible luck with installing new video drivers under linux. It always fucks something up, and when I do it's like 10x faster to just reinstall the whole shebang than to un-fuck whatever went wrong.

    I'm very tempted recently, though, ever since getting Penumbra with that Indie bundle.

    Seeks on
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  • WeretacoWeretaco Cubicle Gangster Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Got bored last night and installed Linux Mint.

    It's a pretty nice implementation of ubuntu but I have to do some figurin' on my touchpad. I get some weird jumpiness sometimes and I gotta figure out how to enable 2 finger scrolling. The option is there but greyed out in 10.04 of ubuntus from what i can see.

    Weretaco on
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  • MblackwellMblackwell Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Seeks wrote: »
    Why would it crash your system? Doesn't sound like it should by any AppDB reports (and some people do have your card)...

    I should elaborate I guess, haha. The card overheats and hard crashes the entire system to prevent damage. It's a limitation of the hardware, not any software/firmware/etc. Happened in Windows pretty reliably. Never got more than 10 minutes into Mass Effect 1 or 2 before it would kill my system, no warning. Happened with a few other games, and once in linux (Nexuiz).

    I'm lamenting the 4870 specifically because on this forum alone I've seen posts by three or four other people with the same problem with this card. Maybe it was just a bad batch, but I'm pretty wary of ATI from this point on.

    Stick with the open source Radeon drivers. The fglrx drivers aren't meant for desktop use.

    I may try, but I always have terrible luck with installing new video drivers under linux. It always fucks something up, and when I do it's like 10x faster to just reinstall the whole shebang than to un-fuck whatever went wrong.

    I'm very tempted recently, though, ever since getting Penumbra with that Indie bundle.

    With my NVIDIA stuff I've always just uninstalled the distro drivers (currently also have to blacklist nouveau) and installed the binary from their website. Too bad about the overheating. You should look into a replacement, as it's pretty much only going to get worse.

    Mblackwell on
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  • Mai-KeroMai-Kero Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    So I want to do cool stuff with Ubuntu but I have no idea what to try. I'm not sure what I would use this for.

    Mai-Kero on
  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Mai-Kero wrote: »
    So I want to do cool stuff with Ubuntu but I have no idea what to try. I'm not sure what I would use this for.

    The things you normally do on a computer.

    MKR on
  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    Seeks wrote: »
    Stick with the open source Radeon drivers. The fglrx drivers aren't meant for desktop use.

    I may try, but I always have terrible luck with installing new video drivers under linux. It always fucks something up, and when I do it's like 10x faster to just reinstall the whole shebang than to un-fuck whatever went wrong.

    I'm very tempted recently, though, ever since getting Penumbra with that Indie bundle.

    I don't know where that persona got that idea, but the fglrx drivers are meant for desktop use, or any one else who needs/wants 3D acceleration. The open source Radeon drivers are shitty at 3D still.

    elliotw2 on
    camo_sig2.pngXBL:Elliotw3|PSN:elliotw2
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    The head ATi Linux dev has said that the focus of the fglrx drivers is the workstation. All desktop features in the fglrx drivers, such as proper video support, 2D acceleration, and compositing are completely secondary to raw 3D performance. This is as the fglrx drivers are there only to support the FireGL users and their uses. Desktop use is looked at as unprofitable.

    http://phoronix.com/forums/showthread.php?t=23020&page=7

    darkphoenix22 on
  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    The vast majority of development on Linux goes toward workstation and server use. Still a good desktop OS.

    MKR on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    MKR wrote: »
    The vast majority of development on Linux goes toward workstation and server use. Still a good desktop OS.

    Definitely. But the desktop market is a growth area. Happily, ATi has thrown us a few bones with the OSS Radeon drivers, which do have proper video support, 2D acceleration, and now proper compositing. 3D is not quite there but it is at least as fast as Intel.

    Linux has grown up and its userbase is spliting into the workstation and desktop subsets, which have VERY different wants and needs. Linux is going to be having growing pains over the next couple years. :P

    darkphoenix22 on
  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    MKR wrote: »
    The vast majority of development on Linux goes toward workstation and server use. Still a good desktop OS.

    Definitely. But the desktop market is a growth area. Happily, ATi has thrown us a few bones with the OSS Radeon drivers, which do have proper video support, 2D acceleration, and now proper compositing. 3D is not quite there but it is at least as fast as Intel.

    Linux has grown up and its userbase is spliting into the workstation and desktop subsets, which have VERY different wants and needs. Linux is going to be having growing pains over the next couple years. :P

    My point was that just because they said their focus was on workstations, they aren't necessarily neglecting desktops.

    MKR on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    As Chromium is being looked at as a replacement for Firefox in many Linux distributions due to speed and H.264, there is a bit of concern about privacy issues surrounding it (mostly because Google is a big company that gets it's money from knowing a lot about you :P).

    For privacy reasons, the URL/search suggestion and DNS pre-caching features in Chromium should probably be made opt-in. I filled a bug at Google to suggest this. Feel free to star it as well to get this issue addressed.

    http://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=44527

    darkphoenix22 on
  • VistiVisti Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    So, I'm used to using Linux/Unix for things. I've played with Ubuntu a couple of times on home machines/virtual machines, and I use command line Unix (AIX) at work all the time as part of my duties as a Oracle DBA. Besides the fairly painless Ubuntu install I've never installed many Linux OS's, and I've never really played with the innards of the operating systems.

    I just downloaded ArchLinux to throw on a virtual machine. How much pain am I in for? :D

    Not very much at all, I bet. The main problem with installing Arch is doing it on one machine, so you can't look at the quickstart / install guide at the same time, which is really confusing the first time, when you're just dropped to a terminal and then have to get an internet connection (maybe even wireless) going and then some sort of CLI browser before you can look at the next step in the guide.

    Visti on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • MalkorMalkor Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Visti wrote: »
    So, I'm used to using Linux/Unix for things. I've played with Ubuntu a couple of times on home machines/virtual machines, and I use command line Unix (AIX) at work all the time as part of my duties as a Oracle DBA. Besides the fairly painless Ubuntu install I've never installed many Linux OS's, and I've never really played with the innards of the operating systems.

    I just downloaded ArchLinux to throw on a virtual machine. How much pain am I in for? :D

    Not very much at all, I bet. The main problem with installing Arch is doing it on one machine, so you can't look at the quickstart / install guide at the same time, which is really confusing the first time, when you're just dropped to a terminal and then have to get an internet connection (maybe even wireless) going and then some sort of CLI browser before you can look at the next step in the guide.

    haha, yeah.

    Drop a motherfucker into the wilderness.

    Walks out a linux admin.

    Malkor on
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  • VistiVisti Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I honestly think I learned the bulk of my more intimate knowledge by installing Arch. I failed once (twice?), but I learned stuff both of the times. It helped that I nuked my system to install, so I had to do it or I wouldn't have a functional system. Except of course that I wussed out and installed Cruch the first time.

    Visti on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I installed Arch the lazy way (Chakra).

    I had a good bit of Linux knowledge in the first place from some other distros (it helps that I frequently favor the CLI of GUI tools for the most part), but some of my more "deep" knowledge came from Gentoo (which I used for a while starting in late 2002), both from the installation and actually using it.

    Barrakketh on
    Rollers are red, chargers are blue....omae wa mou shindeiru
  • ImpersonatorImpersonator Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Man, I wonder if Chromium will implement Chrome's newly announced web store. Plants vs Zombies and LEGO Star Wars? Yes, please!

    Impersonator on
    Bioptic wrote: »
    Lemmings was pro-Communist propeganda. All are created equal, sorted into specific jobs and roles that they will hold for the rest of their lives by a higher authority, and must sacrifice continuously for the good of the group. Success is measured by meeting quotas and nothing else. Also, nuclear holocaust.
  • krushkrush Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    MKR wrote: »
    32 bit is good up to 4 GB. If you don't have more than that, 64 bit won't do anything outside of some very narrow and unusual situations.

    You can also run a PAE kernel to get 32-bit to support up to 64GB of RAM. I believe Ubuntu Lucid 32-bit automatically uses the PAE kernel if you have 4GB or more of RAM. infinityOS and Fedora use it by default now.

    Running 64-bit Linux is too much hassle IMO. There are a lot of native games and game-like things that need 32-bit Linux to run.

    This is good to know, as I'm probably going to drop another 2GB into my machine and I was gonna turn on PAE in Windows XP, but never bothered to look to see if I needed to turn it on in Linux. I kinda assumed it was already on in the kernel.

    krush on
  • TincheTinche No dog food for Victor tonight. Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    That might have been the Chrome OS web store, there.

    Edit: I wouldn't mind being wrong about that, though.

    Tinche on
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  • elliotw2elliotw2 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    Tinche wrote: »
    That might have been the Chrome OS web store, there.

    Edit: I wouldn't mind being wrong about that, though.

    Well, Chromium also includes Chromium OS

    elliotw2 on
    camo_sig2.pngXBL:Elliotw3|PSN:elliotw2
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    elliotw2 wrote: »
    Tinche wrote: »
    That might have been the Chrome OS web store, there.

    Edit: I wouldn't mind being wrong about that, though.

    Well, Chromium also includes Chromium OS

    The Chrome web store sells webapps. They'll work on anything vaguely modernly web browsery. Source

    Frem on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    krush wrote: »
    This is good to know, as I'm probably going to drop another 2GB into my machine and I was gonna turn on PAE in Windows XP, but never bothered to look to see if I needed to turn it on in Linux. I kinda assumed it was already on in the kernel.

    I would be careful turning on PAE (well enabling more than 4GB of memory) in Windows XP. A lot of programs (especially drivers) have trouble with full PAE addressing on 32-bit Windows. 64-bit Vista or 64-bit Windows 7 is your best bet if you want to address more than 4GB of memory on Windows.

    Fortunately, these memory addressing problems have been long taken care of on 32-bit Linux (though I found a bug in Chromium related to the NX-bit, that has since been fixed).

    darkphoenix22 on
  • krushkrush Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    krush wrote: »
    This is good to know, as I'm probably going to drop another 2GB into my machine and I was gonna turn on PAE in Windows XP, but never bothered to look to see if I needed to turn it on in Linux. I kinda assumed it was already on in the kernel.

    I would be careful turning on PAE (well enabling more than 4GB of memory) in Windows XP. A lot of programs (especially drivers) have trouble with full PAE addressing on 32-bit Windows. 64-bit Vista or 64-bit Windows 7 is your best bet if you want to address more than 4GB of memory on Windows.

    Fortunately, these memory addressing problems have been long taken care of on 32-bit Linux (though I found a bug in Chromium related to the NX-bit, that has since been fixed).

    Microsoft crippled PAE in XP so it only allows you to to fully access 4GB, no more than that. That's smart on Microsoft's part, since it keeps cheap IT departments from running a database on XP instead of 2003 Server (2K3 will address up to 64GB).

    krush on
  • FremFrem Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    krush wrote: »
    This is good to know, as I'm probably going to drop another 2GB into my machine and I was gonna turn on PAE in Windows XP, but never bothered to look to see if I needed to turn it on in Linux. I kinda assumed it was already on in the kernel.

    I would be careful turning on PAE (well enabling more than 4GB of memory) in Windows XP. A lot of programs (especially drivers) have trouble with full PAE addressing on 32-bit Windows. 64-bit Vista or 64-bit Windows 7 is your best bet if you want to address more than 4GB of memory on Windows.

    Fortunately, these memory addressing problems have been long taken care of on 32-bit Linux (though I found a bug in Chromium related to the NX-bit, that has since been fixed).

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't there some cravats you'd need to watch out for with PAE? Stuff like single processes only being able to address something like 3GB of RAM? Although I suppose you probably won't be running anything like that on a 32-bit machine anyway. :wink:

    Edit:
    For privacy reasons, the URL/search suggestion and DNS pre-caching features in Chromium should probably be made opt-in.

    Wait, how is DNS pre-caching a privacy issue? It just submits multiple queries as you type, right? How are like three queries less private than one? Firefox does that, too.

    Frem on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    krush wrote: »
    Microsoft crippled PAE in XP so it only allows you to to fully access 4GB, no more than that. That's smart on Microsoft's part, since it keeps cheap IT departments from running a database on XP instead of 2003 Server (2K3 will address up to 64GB).

    I believe that XP SP2 and above enables PAE by default to take limited advantage of the NX-bit. The 4 GB limit can be removed by setting some options, but there are driver compatibility issues.
    Frem wrote: »
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't there some cravats you'd need to watch out for with PAE? Stuff like single processes only being able to address something like 3GB of RAM? Although I suppose you probably won't be running anything like that on a 32-bit machine anyway. :wink:

    I believe the limit is 4GB per process on Linux with the PAE kernel. This is more than enough though for home use, though I can see some video encoding applications potentially bumping against it.
    Frem wrote: »
    Wait, how is DNS pre-caching a privacy issue? It just submits multiple queries as you type, right? How are like three queries less private than one? Firefox does that, too.

    That's a good point. After looking deeper into it, the pre-caching mostly seems to be an issue in terms actually being to clear it (http://www.mydigitallife.info/2010/04/13/how-to-clear-purge-or-reset-google-chrome-dns-pre-fetching-cache/). Clearing the pre-cache seems to be a giant pain.

    I still think that the URL/search suggestions should be purely opt-in. I've updated the bug to reflect this.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • iTunesIsEviliTunesIsEvil Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Know what I love about Linux? Mirrors. I'm in Indiana, so: Why hello there Indiana University's mirror of {lots of distros}. Hello to you too, Purdue University's mirror of {lots of distros}. And GA Tech's mirrors always seem lightning-fast.

    This post brought to you by too much coffee this morning while installing arch in a VM.

    iTunesIsEvil on
  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    I'm always pleased when I find mirrors at UGA. It's about as close to a single hop as you can get short of hosting on your own network, and it's always fast. But that's because it's a straight 20 mile shot down the road. :D

    Mirrors in Atlanta are good too since it's only 50 miles.

    MKR on
  • theSquidtheSquid Sydney, AustraliaRegistered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Ah UNSW mirror. I enjoyed using you to install Linux on my laptop in a lab in about 20 minutes.

    theSquid on
  • darkphoenix22darkphoenix22 Registered User
    edited May 2010
    I love the Univeristy of Waterloo's mirrors. Mostly because they seem to host everything.

    darkphoenix22 on
  • VistiVisti Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    We've got one national mirror, that's more than enough.

    Visti on
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • MKRMKR Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Visti wrote: »
    We've got one national mirror, that's more than enough.

    Yeah, but from one end of Denmark to the other is the distance between me and Atlanta. :P

    MKR on
  • BarrakkethBarrakketh Registered User regular
    edited May 2010
    Know what I love about Linux? Mirrors. I'm in Indiana, so: Why hello there Indiana University's mirror of {lots of distros}. Hello to you too, Purdue University's mirror of {lots of distros}. And GA Tech's mirrors always seem lightning-fast.

    This post brought to you by too much coffee this morning while installing arch in a VM.

    I use powerpill as an interface to pacman. It accepts the same arguments as pacman (and has some extras), but uses aria2c for simultaneous and segmented downloading from multiple sources. It also retrieves a list of the most recently updated mirrors and can also rank them by speed (I never need to rank them).

    Barrakketh on
    Rollers are red, chargers are blue....omae wa mou shindeiru
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