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PA Weight Loss Challenge: Beware the Ides of March!

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Posts

  • AspectVoidAspectVoid Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Out of curiosity how much do you guys find you vary day by day? About a year and a half ago i weighed 310, now i'm 193 or so, but I find (using multiple scales) I can go up or down by 5 pounds each day, and do quite regularly. I've kinda been stuck at this weight for the past few months, but i've also been pizza and beering it up every weekend during that time and keeping it in check with exercise so i'm pretty happy with it staying the same

    When I started my diet back in January, from morning to morning I tended to loose about 2/10ths of a pound. The past week has been kind of strange for me, though, because I took most of last week off, and I think the change in my metabolism kind of screwed things up. I went from 274 on Saturday morning to 269 on Tuesday morning. This morning I was back up to 272. I'm pretty sure that the extra weight I put on this morning was just water weight (as I had probably an extra 3 or 4 large glasses of water yesterday beyond what I normally have), but I'm going to eat light today just to be safe.

    AspectVoid on
    PSN|AspectVoid
  • dzenithdzenith Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Taranis wrote: »
    I've been feeling pretty tired lately. I'm not sure if I'm not eating enough carbs, or if I don't have enough days of rest in my workout schedule, but I'm pretty much always fatigued. I might work a nap into my schedule, but I'm not sure if that would if that would be worse for my metabolism than being fatigued.

    Has it just been this week? I've been tired this week too but I think it is because daylight savings time has kicked my butt.

    dzenith on
  • apricotmuffinsapricotmuffins Angry Bee Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    scales are fickle. They can give you varying weights depending on how you stand on them.

    I mean, I weighed myself a while back quickly in someone elses bathroom (I own no scales) and I was pretty pleased. Half an hour later and nothing ingested or changed about myself and it was 7lbs more than before. I didnt realise I'd been standing a little bit on the edge the first time round.


    Speaking of weights, I FEEL like i've lost tons but I actually havent. I'm waiting for a weight drop to happen soon.

    I've lost nearly 2 inches off my waist in a month, and my boobs are definately smaller, and my shoulders are definately more defined (if you can call my hulking shoulders defined, har) and I'm having a bit of a mindfuck because i thought i didnt care about WEIGHT but it turns out i do.

    bah

    apricotmuffins on
  • HalibutHalibut Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Irond Will wrote: »
    any of you guys have any experience with those dorky five-finger shoes? i have heard that they are great for correcting your stride and i've been finding that i pound the shit out of the treadmill when i run

    If you don't have absolutely perfect arches, which very few people do they will absolutely fuck your feet running as well.

    I have a pair of Sprints (open top with a strap to secure them). I started out running with them, but they didn't correct my stride enough to break free of the shin splints pain that I've been plagued with any time I tried to run.

    I switched to barefoot running and never looked back. You'd be surprised at how gently you can run without anything on your feet.

    Lots of people have good results with the Vibrams though.

    My advice for anyone starting out with barefoot or minimal running is to start SLOW (meaning distance and pace). Your foot muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones won't be used to supporting themselves after a lifetime of wearing restrictive shoes. But, if you go slowly, your feet will strengthen and eventually you'll be able to run without any problems.

    I had some of the flattest feet in the world. I was prescribed orthotics in 3rd grade to correct my arches. Years of wearing otrhotics could never fix what 6 months of running barefoot did. Now, I don't have high arches by any stretch, but my feet no longer naturally roll inward when I stand.

    Halibut on
  • AspectVoidAspectVoid Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    scales are fickle. They can give you varying weights depending on how you stand on them.

    I mean, I weighed myself a while back quickly in someone elses bathroom (I own no scales) and I was pretty pleased. Half an hour later and nothing ingested or changed about myself and it was 7lbs more than before. I didnt realise I'd been standing a little bit on the edge the first time round.


    Speaking of weights, I FEEL like i've lost tons but I actually havent. I'm waiting for a weight drop to happen soon.

    I've lost nearly 2 inches off my waist in a month, and my boobs are definately smaller, and my shoulders are definately more defined (if you can call my hulking shoulders defined, har) and I'm having a bit of a mindfuck because i thought i didnt care about WEIGHT but it turns out i do.

    bah

    I actually marked my scale so that I stand in roughly the same place each time. It's not 100% perfect, but I feel it's pretty close.

    Speaking on motivation, my huge motivation right now is losing this double chin of mine. It ticks me off to no end, but it seems that it's going to be the last place that I actually lose weight from. Which, while annoying me, means that it's going to stick around and continue to be that motivation I need.

    AspectVoid on
    PSN|AspectVoid
  • TaranisTaranis Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    dzenith wrote: »
    Taranis wrote: »
    I've been feeling pretty tired lately. I'm not sure if I'm not eating enough carbs, or if I don't have enough days of rest in my workout schedule, but I'm pretty much always fatigued. I might work a nap into my schedule, but I'm not sure if that would if that would be worse for my metabolism than being fatigued.

    Has it just been this week? I've been tired this week too but I think it is because daylight savings time has kicked my butt.

    I hadn't thought of daylight savings time, that might be it.





    I weighed in at 196 today, hopefully I'll keep those 3 lbs off (and it wasn't just water weight).

    I'm pretty sure I'm not getting enough carbs in my diet, because I reek of ammonia after a long cardio session. At this point I really don't care if it means that I'm burning muscle. Fat loss is the only thing that matters at this point.

    Taranis on
    / steam / [blizzard] taranis#1834 /
    EH28YFo.jpg
  • skettiosskettios Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I added a column for March and April

    skettios on
  • J-PJ-P Registered User
    edited March 2011
    Halibut wrote: »

    I had some of the flattest feet in the world. I was prescribed orthotics in 3rd grade to correct my arches. Years of wearing otrhotics could never fix what 6 months of running barefoot did. Now, I don't have high arches by any stretch, but my feet no longer naturally roll inward when I stand.


    Wait, you went running barefoot? Is this really a good idea? What prompt this? Curious curious.

    ----

    I learned that psychologically, we have more will power in the morning. So I really kick my self out of bed in the morning to go for a run. Eventually, after a month or so, this will become habitual, and I won't have to waste my will power forcing myself out. Its just how habits are formed.

    What used to keep me from running is my old mental state. I would find reasons not to go out. "I have to streatch, get ready, its raining, blah blah blah."

    Now though, I have to think of the ends, to justify the means. I have to know "Why" am I doing this. Really, a healthy mind will grant me more will power throughout the day. More focus for what I want to do. Which is my art. I find reasons for "Why" I'm out here.

    For Motivation I do this penalty thing. I tell a friend "Hey, I want to lose weight. For every morning I don't go for a run, I'll [insert something I really don't want to do here]". Usually its pay them.

    This really keeps me going, cause I really have to save my money.

    J-P on
    Ray gun and sharpies.
  • DirtyDirtyVagrantDirtyDirtyVagrant Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I am missing something from my diet and I do not know what.

    I like to eat eggs and whole wheat toast for breakfast. Or cereal (kashi shredded wheat or honey almond flax are my favorites)

    I snack on unsalted dry roasted peanuts. Because they're cheap and tasty and satisfying. Greek yogurt is awesome, but it's like a dollar a cup and that's a little pricey. Need some other stuff too, but I can't imagine what.

    I also keep frozen strawberries and some protein powder, and use both to make pretty awesome strawberry shakes.

    I'm trying to get out of eating meat. It's getting too expensive, and also I'm a huge pussy (<3 the animals and all that), so any recipes involving beans, lentils, or hummus (and things to dip in hummus) would be awesome. Suggestions for weird/nutritious (and cheap) things to put on salads would be nice, too.

    Ideas on how to use things like avocados in things that do not also involve turkey or pico de gallo...

    Even recommendations for things like frozen food - anything that you find to be at least relatively inoffensive.

    I'm going to be moving out of this place soon. Which means no more yucky dinners of hamburger helper and shit just because it's there. I'll be able to swear off all junk food because I never buy it - I only eat it when it's lying around.

    Oh, also. Things I can pack for work lunches. I have ice packs and a nice thermos, so /shrug.

    DirtyDirtyVagrant on
  • StericaSterica Halloween Japes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited March 2011
    I am pretty addicted to mint and dark chocolate almonds. Probably better for you than peanuts, and delicious. Just watch the servings.

    If you want to replace meat, then look for the various frozen sausages and similar stuff from vegetarian products. They're not as tasty, and they're not going to have quite as much protein, but they're tasty and it's pretty much just protein instead of all the fat the normal stuff has.

    Sterica on
    YL9WnCY.png
  • LadyMLadyM Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Oh man, let me tell you what is awesome. Morningstar's vegetarian corndogs, that's what. They are so good, SO GOOD. I actually like them better than real corndogs.

    LadyM on
  • HalibutHalibut Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    J-P wrote: »
    Halibut wrote: »

    I had some of the flattest feet in the world. I was prescribed orthotics in 3rd grade to correct my arches. Years of wearing otrhotics could never fix what 6 months of running barefoot did. Now, I don't have high arches by any stretch, but my feet no longer naturally roll inward when I stand.


    Wait, you went running barefoot? Is this really a good idea? What prompt this? Curious curious.
    Barefoot running is totally a thing.

    The basic philosophy behind it is that humans have been around for about 100,000 years. There is significant evidence that humans became successful because we evolved the physical attributes required for persistence hunting (literally killing an animal by chasing it to exhaustion). Since all humans are anatomically identical, it stands to reason that all humans (with the exception of maladies caused by birth defects or injuries) have the basic physical attributes necessary to run long distances.

    Before recent human history, people wore nothing on their feet. Or if they did, it was thin leather, with no arch support, cushioning, or motion control found in modern shoes. So, by taking off our shoes, we're just running like our ancestors did.

    The technique is different from how most of us are taught to run. Instead of landing on your heal and rolling to your toe, you land more on the ball or mid-foot. Instead of landing with extended knees (which transfers the impact force into your knees, hips, and spine), you bend your knees and use them as shock absorbers. And the immediate feedback of the ground is almost like having a free running coach. You feel immediately when your technique is off. When done correctly, barefoot running is light and low-impact.

    So, that's the "Why Barefoot? 101". If you've got any questions I'd be happy to answer.

    Halibut on
  • StericaSterica Halloween Japes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited March 2011
    LadyM wrote: »
    Oh man, let me tell you what is awesome. Morningstar's vegetarian corndogs, that's what. They are so good, SO GOOD. I actually like them better than real corndogs.
    Man, I love corndogs. I'm going shopping tomorrow, so I'll keep an eye out.

    Sterica on
    YL9WnCY.png
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    Halibut wrote: »
    J-P wrote: »
    Halibut wrote: »

    I had some of the flattest feet in the world. I was prescribed orthotics in 3rd grade to correct my arches. Years of wearing otrhotics could never fix what 6 months of running barefoot did. Now, I don't have high arches by any stretch, but my feet no longer naturally roll inward when I stand.


    Wait, you went running barefoot? Is this really a good idea? What prompt this? Curious curious.
    Barefoot running is totally a thing.

    The basic philosophy behind it is that humans have been around for about 100,000 years. There is significant evidence that humans became successful because we evolved the physical attributes required for persistence hunting (literally killing an animal by chasing it to exhaustion). Since all humans are anatomically identical, it stands to reason that all humans (with the exception of maladies caused by birth defects or injuries) have the basic physical attributes necessary to run long distances.

    Before recent human history, people wore nothing on their feet. Or if they did, it was thin leather, with no arch support, cushioning, or motion control found in modern shoes. So, by taking off our shoes, we're just running like our ancestors did.

    The technique is different from how most of us are taught to run. Instead of landing on your heal and rolling to your toe, you land more on the ball or mid-foot. Instead of landing with extended knees (which transfers the impact force into your knees, hips, and spine), you bend your knees and use them as shock absorbers. And the immediate feedback of the ground is almost like having a free running coach. You feel immediately when your technique is off. When done correctly, barefoot running is light and low-impact.

    So, that's the "Why Barefoot? 101". If you've got any questions I'd be happy to answer.

    Why does this strike me as being similar to the raw food movement in terms of appeals to prehistory

    mrt144 on
  • LadyMLadyM Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    I'd like to try barefoot running, but I'm sort of worried about stepping on glass and junk.

    LadyM on
  • StericaSterica Halloween Japes Registered User, Moderator mod
    edited March 2011
    Unlike raw foodism, it's not terribly important. Shoes were basically for protecting your feet, so there's no harm in barefoot running unless it's through a parking lot.

    Compare to raw foodism, where you can wind up with food poisoning.

    Sterica on
    YL9WnCY.png
  • geckahngeckahn Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Halibut wrote: »
    J-P wrote: »
    Halibut wrote: »

    I had some of the flattest feet in the world. I was prescribed orthotics in 3rd grade to correct my arches. Years of wearing otrhotics could never fix what 6 months of running barefoot did. Now, I don't have high arches by any stretch, but my feet no longer naturally roll inward when I stand.


    Wait, you went running barefoot? Is this really a good idea? What prompt this? Curious curious.
    Barefoot running is totally a thing.

    The basic philosophy behind it is that humans have been around for about 100,000 years. There is significant evidence that humans became successful because we evolved the physical attributes required for persistence hunting (literally killing an animal by chasing it to exhaustion). Since all humans are anatomically identical, it stands to reason that all humans (with the exception of maladies caused by birth defects or injuries) have the basic physical attributes necessary to run long distances.

    Before recent human history, people wore nothing on their feet. Or if they did, it was thin leather, with no arch support, cushioning, or motion control found in modern shoes. So, by taking off our shoes, we're just running like our ancestors did.

    The technique is different from how most of us are taught to run. Instead of landing on your heal and rolling to your toe, you land more on the ball or mid-foot. Instead of landing with extended knees (which transfers the impact force into your knees, hips, and spine), you bend your knees and use them as shock absorbers. And the immediate feedback of the ground is almost like having a free running coach. You feel immediately when your technique is off. When done correctly, barefoot running is light and low-impact.

    So, that's the "Why Barefoot? 101". If you've got any questions I'd be happy to answer.

    Why does this strike me as being similar to the raw food movement in terms of appeals to prehistory

    Feel free to compare it to Paleo. That makes sense.

    The raw food movement just makes no sense.

    geckahn on
  • HalibutHalibut Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    LadyM wrote: »
    I'd like to try barefoot running, but I'm sort of worried about stepping on glass and junk.

    In the 6 months I've been running barefoot, I've only stepped on one thing that punctured my skin. I stepped on some kind of acorn-ish thing that exploded under my foot and embedded a fairly deep splinter. I was running with my dogs (meaning I was being pulled against my will) at night and simply didn't have time to see it or react to stepping on it.

    You'd be surprised by the lack of glass and junk on most roads and sidewalks. But you also become more aware of your surroundings and realize that all of the dangers you were afraid of are easily avoidable if you're paying attention.

    Halibut on
  • mrt144mrt144 King of the Numbernames Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
    geckahn wrote: »
    mrt144 wrote: »
    Halibut wrote: »
    J-P wrote: »
    Halibut wrote: »

    I had some of the flattest feet in the world. I was prescribed orthotics in 3rd grade to correct my arches. Years of wearing otrhotics could never fix what 6 months of running barefoot did. Now, I don't have high arches by any stretch, but my feet no longer naturally roll inward when I stand.


    Wait, you went running barefoot? Is this really a good idea? What prompt this? Curious curious.
    Barefoot running is totally a thing.

    The basic philosophy behind it is that humans have been around for about 100,000 years. There is significant evidence that humans became successful because we evolved the physical attributes required for persistence hunting (literally killing an animal by chasing it to exhaustion). Since all humans are anatomically identical, it stands to reason that all humans (with the exception of maladies caused by birth defects or injuries) have the basic physical attributes necessary to run long distances.

    Before recent human history, people wore nothing on their feet. Or if they did, it was thin leather, with no arch support, cushioning, or motion control found in modern shoes. So, by taking off our shoes, we're just running like our ancestors did.

    The technique is different from how most of us are taught to run. Instead of landing on your heal and rolling to your toe, you land more on the ball or mid-foot. Instead of landing with extended knees (which transfers the impact force into your knees, hips, and spine), you bend your knees and use them as shock absorbers. And the immediate feedback of the ground is almost like having a free running coach. You feel immediately when your technique is off. When done correctly, barefoot running is light and low-impact.

    So, that's the "Why Barefoot? 101". If you've got any questions I'd be happy to answer.

    Why does this strike me as being similar to the raw food movement in terms of appeals to prehistory

    Feel free to compare it to Paleo. That makes sense.

    The raw food movement just makes no sense.

    Paleo and Raw use the same rationale of prehistorical diets being the best because modern diets have all these issues attendant with them like heart disease, diabetes, and thusly diets from a time where we only have archeological evidence to support them are superior.

    Sure, they're different in practice but they're cut from the same cloth in basis and rationale.

    And barefoot running has that same rationale going for it; shoes cause problems because they aren't natural, thus running without shoes like our prehistoric ancestors did is superior.

    mrt144 on
  • KyouguKyougu Registered User regular
    edited March 2011
  • nianianianianiania Registered User regular
    edited July 2011
    BALEETED

    nianiania on
    2014 Tri-Wizard Drinking Tournament
    Hufflepuff: Death Eaters / Head of House
  • AzariusAzarius Registered User
    Groovy... so all our posts for the last few months are gone. :(

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