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Legal Issues Panel

SWATJesterSWATJester Registered User regular
edited February 2011 in PAX Archive
Friday, March 11, 1:30-2:30 in the Naga Theater. Make sure to get in line early -- in previous years at PAX Prime we've definitely had a line at the door, and the room fills up fairly quickly.

The Legal Issues in Games Panel is making its debut at PAX East! Those of you who have seen the panel before at PAX Prime in the past three years know what to expect, but for everyone else, here's how it works.

Our panel consists of a cross section of attorneys representing all aspects of the game industry. On the big publisher's side we have Seth Krauss, Executive VP and General Counsel at Take-Two Interactive. Representing the International Game Developers Association is "The Game Attorney", Tom Buscaglia (who also has a solo practice and is one of the most well known lawyers in the industry. Also his parties are legendary.) We also have two lawyers in private practice at large, expensive firms -- Ross Dannenberg is a partner at Banner & Witcoff and writes the Patent Arcade blog, and Greg Boyd is an associate at Davis & Gilbert LLP and is our resident academic (he's an adjunct professor at New York Law School). And finally, I'll be moderating the panel, representing small firms and journalism. I'm Dan Rosenthal, an attorney with Game Law Partners, a small practice representing mostly indie devs and startups. I also am a contributing editor at GamePolitics.com, and I have been a developer and journalist in the industry for over a decade.

This year, we're looking to hear from you guys in advance about what issues you'd like to hear about at the panel. Typically we like to spend about 30 minutes or so on panel discussion, and then reserve the other 30 minutes or so for open Q+A. Questions about how to protect your game's IP? Where should you form your hot new MMOFPSRPGFurrysim studio's corporate headquarters? What's going to happen with the Supreme Court and violent games? Now's your chance to learn more without having to pay a $350/hr bill! And of course, we'll be available after the panel for longer discussions or if you're looking for an attorney and want to know more about us.


So, what topics would you guys like us to discuss during the panel discussion portion?

Moderator, PAX Prime 08, 09, 10, 10-East, panels on "Legal Issues in Gaming"
Contributing Editor, http://www.gamepolitics.com
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Posts

  • ChronoHawkChronoHawk Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I think there should be some sort of discussion regarding the California Court Decisons. While these have died down since November, the decisions on these matters will be coming into focus soon and will likely have a major impact on the industry (especially if the proposed Ban passes)

    ChronoHawk on
    I am NOT Rider Miller!!!!

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  • bustin98bustin98 Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    I'd like some insight on why politicians have been trying to institute some sort of law governing purchasing of video games, whether by minors or not. As laws get shot down as unconstitional, someone else tries the same thing. Is it a matter of not communicating, or do they look at it as trying to tear down a wall, or trying to adjust wording so it meets constitutional requirements (though I would think there is a refinement process when writing law)? And are the motivations that they are trying to show they are doing their job, or is there some power grab going on since the video game industry is bringing in more money than other entertainment sectors?

    And more than that, why do polictians continue to cite half truths and mis-characterizations of the supposed side effects of playing games? Just for the sound-bites and political points, or are they really uneducated about the subject at hand?

    bustin98 on
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  • SWATJesterSWATJester Registered User regular
    edited February 2011
    Thanks, great ideas. In answer to your second question bustin98, a little of both. Generally politicians don't know anything about the subject (unless it is one of their "pets"), they read briefings from their legislative assistants. Those LAs get the data for those briefings from, among other things, one-sheets and other data sent by lobbyists. So, their ignorance breeds politics. Some, like Sen. Yee, are just an exception and are just (to use the technical term) haters.

    SWATJester on
    Moderator, PAX Prime 08, 09, 10, 10-East, panels on "Legal Issues in Gaming"
    Contributing Editor, http://www.gamepolitics.com
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