It's a sort of lizard-man now - leveling up digital painting

Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished BovineThe PIT, level 26Registered User regular
edited May 2013 in Artist's Corner
Been trying to level up my digital painting lately. I'm pretty happy with my lineart and greyscale values are coming along, but I'd love some help improving my coloring (and my lineart and greyscaling if it turns out I'm foolishly overestimating them.)

My latest effort of this evening, some monstrous humanoid with traces of bat in its ancestry and cancerous tumors blooming on his noggin. Everything's done with Photoshop.

deeroz_face_bw.jpg

I've seen people have lots of good results with colorizing greyscale images, so I thought I'd give it a try.

Here's colors layer set multiply, which I liked but felt was a little too dark
deeroz_face_col1.jpg

Overlay - Easier to see, but they feel a bit too washed out
deeroz_face_col2.jpg

I tried combining having both the previous layers with different opacity for this
deeroz_face_col3.jpg

I feel that works best... but my highlights feel too dim now.

Any thoughts?

H9f4bVe.png
Golden Yak on
Geth

Posts

  • Angel_of_BaconAngel_of_Bacon Moderator mod
    This is pretty cool; good structure, nice design. But before going into color, I might suggest something on the grayscale first, basically just applying a little more subtlety to the rendering.
    goldenYak.jpg

    As for the coloring, it's a solid start- just a heads up that if you aiming for a rich, painted final look, you're almost always going to have to apply more than one color layer to accomplish that, because it can be difficult to get exactly what you want when you're trying to figure out how the colors you're picking are going to be effected by the blending modes (as you saw, one of the difficulties can be getting nice, saturated shadows when you're always blending with a grey tone). Don't be afraid to experiment and paint on top of your layers just with a normal layer to get what you need.

    IrukaMuddyParasolm3naceninjaicondimentkingProspiciencefranciummelting_dollCambiatabombardierJproductionsKazitronGolden Yakwahay
  • Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The PIT, level 26Registered User regular
    Thanks Bacon, that seems like some really good advice. I can definitely see know where I need to work on things. I'll try some of that tonight.

    H9f4bVe.png
  • Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The PIT, level 26Registered User regular
    This evening's efforts

    deeroz_face_bw_v2.jpg

    Definitely needed the extra attention to rendering, I think it's a big improvement. Still a few areas I wanna tweak, but I decided to check out what the colors looked like with these new values.

    deeroz_face_v2_col1.jpg

    Hey, looking better already.

    I'll give him another evening then I think I'll start a new creature.

    H9f4bVe.png
  • MustangMustang Registered User regular
    Bacon paintovers were/still-are; the best learning materials I've ever had.

    melting_dollMuddyParasol
  • NibCromNibCrom Registered User regular
    Bacon is a swell guy.

    bombardiermelting_dollMuddyParasol
  • Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The PIT, level 26Registered User regular
    M'kay, here we are

    deeroz_face_v3_col1.jpg

    Could spent some more time on the colors, but I think I'll move on to another piece and see if I can nail the rendering quicker first.

    H9f4bVe.png
  • Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The PIT, level 26Registered User regular
    Next creature. Only had time for the lines this evening. Based somewhat on thorny devil lizards.

    changed_face_roughs.jpg

    H9f4bVe.png
    Geth
  • Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The PIT, level 26Registered User regular
    Latest efforts:

    B&W so far:
    changed_face_WIP.jpg

    Color scheme mucking about:
    changed_face_schemeWIP.jpg

    Haven't made much progress lately - too busy with work.

    I'm worried that I get too bogged down trying to render every minute detail. But I'm not very happy with the results when I try to generalize - it seems too muddy and blurry to me.

    I persevere...

    H9f4bVe.png
  • tynictynic PICNIC BADASS Registered User, ClubPA regular
    edited June 2013
    what bacon said about your light source still applies. You're shading each individual element (like a scale) as though it had an individual lighting scheme, rather than considering lighting the image as a whole. I can't really add anything more constructive than what bacon already posted, so I would suggest you go look at his paintovers again and really try to apply what he's demonstrated to your next image (or this one, if you want to rework it). Think about both the direction and the intensity of the light source, think about what would be brightest and what would be mid-tone, etc etc. I think you've just slipped back into old colouring habits when you painted this one. You are right in that you get bogged down rendering - small details are the last thing you should look at, but you launch right into them at your linework stage, which is hindering the painting process. Basically you're just colouring in the lines, rather than painting by building up a form.

    edit: to expand a bit more, the thick black outlining of each detailed element are flattening out your sketch before you've even begun. I think there's two problems here, overlapping each other. The first is with your form, linework and inking. Even linework has to consider light sources. Usually you accomplish this by varying your linewidth and strategically adding or removing detail. S_O's old inking tutorial might come in handy: http://smokinghippo.com/TSOtutes/inking_tutorial.html , although it is not a comprehensive guide by any means - but it gives you at least a little bit of an idea of what we mean when we say 'vary your linewidth'.

    You may find that with a more solid underpinning for your painting, you will find it easier to apply the items bacon talked about earlier; start simple, break down and clarify your forms, only add detail at the end.

    Personally - and this is only my preference, it's not a rule - I don't like to put too much detail into a sketch that I'm going to paint over. It holds you back and you start thinking in terms of preserving linework rather than producing an image with the paint. If you want your linework to be part of the final drawing, then you would take a fundamentally different approach to colouring the image. What you're doing here is a full painted render, and I find that benefits more from going in with only a loose sketch guide and then pulling the details and forms out through the process, rather than trying to define it in advance.

    edit 2: also it looks like you're painting on a multiply layer over greyscale? This is not a bad approach, and going in first with greyscale can really help you figure out your values. But you'll find it hard to get the full range of colour values out without tweaking the curves and adding overlays, etc, at the end.

    tynic on
  • Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The PIT, level 26Registered User regular
    I was certainly trying to keep earlier advice in mind. Painting scaly hide is harder than skin, but I figured it would be. I'll stick with the character design cuz I really like it, but perhaps a reboot from linework onwards is in order.
    edit 2: also it looks like you're painting on a multiply layer over greyscale? This is not a bad approach, and going in first with greyscale can really help you figure out your values. But you'll find it hard to get the full range of colour values out without tweaking the curves and adding overlays, etc, at the end.

    Was trying a few color schemes, it was a couple layers just to start with.

    H9f4bVe.png
  • Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The PIT, level 26Registered User regular
    edited July 2013
    Did more fiddling around with techniques. I've found a workflow I'm a bit happier with. Still plugging away on lizardman, but I think he's looking way better than my earlier effort.

    changed_face_lc_WIP.jpg

    Also had some real fun making up a sort've paper-doll concept art file. I started off doing fanart of a Warcraft monster, the Faceless One, and mixed in a few of my own takes on it (inspired of course by the original Lovecraft creation). The file's set up with lots of different details and color schemes so I can mix and match to make several different monsters.

    faceless_one.jpg
    faceless_01.jpg
    faceless_02.jpg

    Had way too much fun with this. So I'm going to try it on a couple of other purely original creatures.

    Golden Yak on
    H9f4bVe.png
  • ToasticusToasticus yeah YEAHRegistered User regular
    These are looking cool! I hope you and Bacon don't mind if I steal that crit format for a bit.

    paintover_goldenyak.jpg

    I also made an animated before and after gif so you can see the difference more directly:
    paintover_goldenyak_anim.gif

    Hope this is helpful. Keep at it!

    Golden Yak
  • Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The PIT, level 26Registered User regular
    Thanks Toasticus, I'll definitely give those steps a shot. Seems like shading is definitely something I have to work on. Some of its a little wonky in parts because a lot of elements (head, gear, belt) are on a separate layer and they don't always play nice with different combos. But I'll see what I can do.

    H9f4bVe.png
  • Golden YakGolden Yak Burnished Bovine The PIT, level 26Registered User regular
    edited August 2013
    Further puttering

    changed_face_lc.jpg
    I think this one's come a long way.


    This one I did just now - I'm trying to teach myself how to draw something that looks like it's glowing from within. Like when you shine a bright flashlight through your palm and you can see the glowing within it.

    black_hiver_01.jpg

    Currently I think it looks like there's a light in front of the creature, as opposed to originating from within the creature itself. I shall perservere.

    Golden Yak on
    H9f4bVe.png
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